PIAT

Sorry.. I misread your post!
Yes, the cart was basically a modified 20 bore shotgun cart with a brass cup on the end. The only ones I have seen had no rims, however this may have been caused during firing. I am assuming the shortened paper case with the base was ejected during firing leaving the brass cup in the tail tube. I would imagine the empty case flew back in the general direction of the firer, no doubt adding to the general joie de vivre of the whole experience!
The whole of the case was brass with the wall thinned to allow separation (for the practice shot anyway). If you look carefully at the bottom pic in the post 528, you can see the rear half of the cartridge above the firers head. Have added a cropped part of the photo below.

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The top of the case is flat, but on firing it distorts out into a small dome milled into the head of the practice shot. Presumably this is to show that the cartridge had fired, so squaddies wouldn't jab something up the tail of the round to pop out a live one. Which would be bad. :oops:
 
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ugly

LE
Moderator
I couldn't until I saw your link. It was one of the reasons behind the recoiling spigot design.

Notice how the sights are offset to the side? Only reason to do that is if there is something in the way of the sights. Like on a Bren gun or a Boys rifle. From your link:

You can see the back sight sticking out to the side, and the foresight is on the side of the loading tray.
Also notice how the sides of the loading tray are a lot higher than is usual, and are more substantial with a rim? That's your magazine well. Red is the magazine:



If you look at his patent for it then it clearly shows a three shot gravity feed magazine over the feed tray. You fire the first round, the recoil sends the Spigot back into the body, and lets another shot fall into the breach.

And you thought the SLR was a weapon of legend! Try a SLP.
So the belt fed bazooka did exist and was invented here first! woo hoo
 
Are these for the PIAT???

Nope, these were for the Northover Projector which used Top Hat Percussion caps to fire the main charge..
 
The whole of the case was brass with the wall thinned to allow separation (for the practice shot anyway). If you look carefully at the bottom pic in the post 528, you can see the rear half of the cartridge above the firers head. Have added a cropped part of the photo below.

View attachment 388462

View attachment 388472
The top of the case is flat, but on firing it distorts out into a small dome milled into the head of the practice shot. Presumably this is to show that the cartridge had fired, so squaddies wouldn't jab something up the tail of the round to pop out a live one. Which would be bad. :oops:
All the PIAT carts I had at the School of Ammo had paper sides and a brass top and bottom.. The one you show is probably an early mark, They were certainly all made from modified shotgun components using shotgun propellent and shotgun manufacturing tooling, as were mortar primary carts..
 
All the PIAT carts I had at the School of Ammo had paper sides and a brass top and bottom.. The one you show is probably an early mark, They were certainly all made from modified shotgun components using shotgun propellent and shotgun manufacturing tooling, as were mortar primary carts..
As a matter of interest, are they akin to a SG blank with regards to ownership? They seem to pop up from time to time.
 
As a matter of interest, are they akin to a SG blank with regards to ownership? They seem to pop up from time to time.
Yep, mostly Eley Grand Prix derivatives..
 
Nope, these were for the Northover Projector which used Top Hat Percussion caps to fire the main charge..
Off topic a bit but there are photos of the Northover Projector in Malaya. I don't know if it saw use and in truth I haven't looked especially hard yet. One tends to read that x weapon was 'Home Guard' only but some at least were sent overseas.
large_000000.jpg
 
The whole of the case was brass with the wall thinned to allow separation (for the practice shot anyway). If you look carefully at the bottom pic in the post 528, you can see the rear half of the cartridge above the firers head. Have added a cropped part of the photo below.

View attachment 388462

View attachment 388472
The top of the case is flat, but on firing it distorts out into a small dome milled into the head of the practice shot. Presumably this is to show that the cartridge had fired, so squaddies wouldn't jab something up the tail of the round to pop out a live one. Which would be bad. :oops:
What the cartridge looks like to me is the top is a brass cup pressed down into the bottom (turned upside down) of a longer, thinner walled brass cup. Another brass cup is then pressed in (I can't tell how many pieces that is made from), and the end of the outer cup was then crimped or rolled over to hold the assembly together.
 
Very interesting to see that. Looks quite static, so presumably only used for tests? Is it fired by a lanyard?
I don't know, to be honest. At a glance it looks like an early iteration of the PIAT but I can't picture how it would be held. It is static. The ground might support the rear plate but how easily would the weapon then be traversed? Given that, a static test set up makes sense.
 
Not a baby bombard. We covered that the other day.

That however, looks more like the middle one in this rack:


It's more complete, and the bi-pod is further forward. I suspected it was the Arbalest. Which makes me wonder if the Bi-pod can move forwards and backwards as a range setting?
The underside of it can be seen here:


Again it rineforces the idea its the Arbalest. But now it seems there's two of them, and the trigger mechanism isn't the same as described (Blacker said he took it off a .32 revolver).

Edit: shot of the trigger mech can be seen here:
 
Not a baby bombard. We covered that the other day.

That wehowever, looks more like the middle one in this rack:


It's more complete, and the bi-pod is further forward. I suspected it was the Arbalest. Which makes me wonder if the Bi-pod can move forwards and backwards as a range setting?
The underside of it can be seen here:


Again it rineforces the idea its the Arbalest. But now it seems there's two of them, and the trigger mechanism isn't the same as described (Blacker said he took it off a .32 revolver).

Edit: shot of the trigger mech can be seen here:
Thanks you. That's very interesting.
What was the method of use? Part ground - supported*? Or, once developed, a PIAT-type trigger, guard and shoulder pad?

*or is the rear plate misleading in terms of what it suggests?
 
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