Photos that make you think.

Some of the saddest retrievals from the area of the Titanic sinking were owners & their dogs, floating together, the owners hands still wrapped around leads or collars. One wonders whether the animal were able to stay alive longer while their owners perished in the cold.
Now that is sad and something I hadn't seen discussed in my perusal of the Titanic sinking literature. I don't know where the kennels were located on the Titanic, but some passengers apparently thought a lot of their dogs to make the effort. Dogs wouldn't have been allowed in a lifeboat, at least I've never heard of any being recovered by the Carpathia. The officers didn't even make sure the life boats were full to capacity with people.
 
With reference to the kit carried over the top on day 1 I have 2 photos to show:

Photo1 is believed to have been a staged photo for the folks back home.

View attachment 631430

Just a rifle, some ammo and a gas mask.

Photo no 2:

View attachment 631431

The caption reads.
British troops negotiating a trench as they go forward in support of an attack on the village of Morval during the Battle of the Somme, July 1, 1916

Note the amount of kit each man is carrying.
Pic1 is a still from the famous Geoffrey Malins film. It is definitely staged. Don’t draw any conclusions from it.
 
Now that is sad and something I hadn't seen discussed in my perusal of the Titanic sinking literature. I don't know where the kennels were located on the Titanic, but some passengers apparently thought a lot of their dogs to make the effort. Dogs wouldn't have been allowed in a lifeboat, at least I've never heard of any being recovered by the Carpathia. The officers didn't even make sure the life boats were full to capacity with people.

Only 12 official dogs on the Titanic (1st class passengers only)
I'm sure a few more were smuggled on.
 
With reference to the kit carried over the top on day 1 I have 2 photos to show:

Photo1 is believed to have been a staged photo for the folks back home.

View attachment 631430

Just a rifle, some ammo and a gas mask.

Photo no 2:

View attachment 631431

The caption reads.
British troops negotiating a trench as they go forward in support of an attack on the village of Morval during the Battle of the Somme, July 1, 1916

Note the amount of kit each man is carrying.

And as my post earlier, those bloody GS shovels! What those chaps went through :(
 
WW1 Casualties / Training / Kit / Somme etc .... the interview with Charles Carrington below really brings out some of the horror of WW! ... and just listen to his age ...

 
an attack by the 7th and 21st divisions in the capture of Bazentin wood on the night of the 13th/14th July (note 'at night')
Part of Rawlinson's Army: this is the attack I referenced upthread, but (despite my earlier remarks) , spend a little time reading a day by day catalogue of the actions that made up the Somme offensive, and it becomes clear (and I think Griffith sets this out in his book) that such large-scale attacks were the exception, not the rule, and that for the most part a Brigade attack generally boiled down to an attack by a battalion (or part thereof), because (a) The Brits were obliged to be offensive, because of their commitment to keep the Hun from putting more effort into Verdun, and (b) They still didn't have the men, the training, tactics, munitions, artillery, mobility etcetera etcetera to do much more.

I'm left with an abiding respect for Haig, in that whatever may be said of him to his detriment, he maintained his Army's morale, and oversaw its transformation from tiny infantry force, to victoriously mighty all-arms juggernaut that outmatched every other force on the Western Front, and arguably any other Front...

No wonder so many millions turned out for his funeral.
 
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Just a pretty ordinary photo of a B-17G over Berlin in November 1944.

View attachment 630588

She’s Blue Grass Girl of the 486th Bomb Group out of Sudbury.
Three months later she was over “Big B” again, for the memorable raid of February 3rd 1945 when a thousand Forts had city centre aiming points. Five hundred Liberators were hitting Magdeburg at the same time as a diversion, and there were more than 900 escorting fighters. An awesome display of air power. (It was the raid where Nazi judge Roland Freisler was killed.)

Aboard Blue Grass Girl nine men must have been crossing fingers and kissing mascots just a bit more than usual: if they made it, they were going to live and go home to the States, for this was their 35th mission. (The original 25 mission combat tour limit introduced in early 1943 had been extended twice.)

Their survival was no foregone conclusion. Although the Luftwaffe fighter force had virtually ceased to exist, German flak artillery had reached a pinnacle of effectiveness. There was a belief amongst American bomber boys, borne out by tragic experience, that the most dangerous times for a crew were in their first few missions, then again in the last few. So when the returning Blue Grass Girl made landfall over the Suffolk coast about ten miles south of Lowestoft, the sense of elation must have been immense.
The plane still had about 50 miles to go to reach home base, and crew should still have been at their stations. Ball, tail and waist gunners would normally leave their stations and gather in the waist in the final few minutes before touchdown.
On this occasion though, understandably we might think, the crew party planned for that evening started early, and the enlisted men gathered in the radio room to get an early start, for they had joined the Lucky Bastards Club.
Flight Engineer S/Sgt Richard Warlick came back from his turret just behind the pilot’s seats, tail gunner Frank Chrastka came forward to join waist gunner Gus Hodge and radio man Arnold “Ray” Welch. Ball turret gunner Johnnie Jones was briefly delayed as he untangled himself from his guns, tubes, belts, and cables. All left their parachute packs in stowage areas.

Blue Grass Girl was in loose formation with her squadron, and in full view of them. She was completely undamaged.
Suddenly, witnesses saw that she burst into flames amidships, with fierce fires raging out of the waist gun hatches. The fire rapidly grew until the whole rear of the fuselage was alight.

Aboard the plane, Richard Warlick came forward and advised the pilot, 1/Lt Lewis Cloud, about the fire. Handing control to co-pilot 1/Lt Frederick Stehle, Cloud went back to see for himself, but after negotiating his way over the catwalk through the bomb bay and opening the door to the radio room he could go no further due to heat.
Returning to the cockpit he resumed control from Stehle and rang the bail out bell, but he could not know whether this could be heard by the men in the rear, even if they were alive.
Stehle, bombardier James McDermott, navigator Charles Scott and flight engineer Warlick jumped and landed safely whilst Cloud attempted to hold the plane steady.
In the rear, ball turret gunner Johnnie Jones managed to jump as well but by the time he did so it was too late and he died when he impacted the ground.
Blue Grass Girl came down near the village of Reydon with four aboard. Lewis Cloud had obviously stayed at his post in the pilot’s seat as observers on the ground, unable to approach the inferno, could see his body burning in the cockpit.

What on earth had happened to cause such a sudden fire ?
Evidence of the last minutes of the plane’s life was available from the four men who had parachuted successfully, but some sources suggest that the inquiry panel were less than completely convinced by all of it.
Lewis Cloud came in for some criticism for permitting crew to leave their stations to whoop it up, but was also praised for staying at the controls in a vain attempt to give any surviving of his rear crew a chance to escape.

It was not unknown for returning Lucky Bastard crews to fire off flares through waist hatches or the roof hatch in the radio room. Some witnesses in other aircraft in formation claimed they had seen some coming from Blue Grass Girl immediately before the fire broke out.

The flares and Very pistol in a B-17 were stored in the area just behind the pilots’ seats and were the responsibility of the flight engineer.
Whilst it might seem invidious to blame one man for the deaths of five of his crew mates without solid proof, the very strong circumstantial evidence points towards the flight engineer bringing the pistol and flares to the impromptu party, and accidentally starting an internal fire.
As the oxygen system became damaged and leaked it would have significantly worsened the conflagration.
If Warlick had contributed to the disaster by bringing the Very pistol and flares to the get-together, it must surely have been a heavy burden for him to carry in the years that followed.
What is making the smoke trails on the right of the picture?
 

Robsa68

Old-Salt
With reference to the kit carried over the top on day 1 I have 2 photos to show:

Photo1 is believed to have been a staged photo for the folks back home.

View attachment 631430

Just a rifle, some ammo and a gas mask.

Photo no 2:

View attachment 631431

The caption reads.
British troops negotiating a trench as they go forward in support of an attack on the village of Morval during the Battle of the Somme, July 1, 1916

Note the amount of kit each man is carrying.
Guy 2nd right over the bags, he's got something strapped to his helmet. Any ideas?
 
Didn't the USAAF have ' lead bombardiers' that target Identified and smoke dropped. Other crews had ' toggliers' that dropped on his smoke marker. ( So much for pickle barrel accuracy).
I may be wrong remembering, something I read ages ago.
Curtis LeMay introduced “Bomb on Leader” tactics when he took command of the 305th Bomb Group in 1942 (Grafton Underwood, later Chelveston.)
Results were considered so effective (a tripling of accuracy) that the practice rapidly spread throughout the entire Eighth Air Force.
LeMay also introduced the straight and level bomb run; bombers had previously ducked and dived, but at the cost of scattering bomb loads widely.
He seems like a terrifying man, but was always ready to fly missions with his men. He later coordinated the firebombing of Japanese cities, in particular Op Meetinghouse, the March 9th/10th 1945 raid on Tokyo which killed 100,000 in one night, dwarfing Hamburg and Dresden. He was still terrifying me in the 50s and 60s as Chief of Staff USAF, with his bellicose recommendations to Presidents Eisenhower, JFK and Johnson. He was running mate to the odious George Wallace, racist Governor of Alabama, in the 1968 Presidential election.

@CutLunchCommando. The smoke trails in the photo of Blue Grass Girl are probably a lead bombardier’s markers, as @Robsa68 has already suggested.
 
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Guy 2nd right over the bags, he's got something strapped to his helmet. Any ideas?
Looking at the photo with as much enlargement as I can, it seems to be a rolled up sandbag fixed like a Roman Legionnaire's plume.
 

Robsa68

Old-Salt
Looking at the photo with as much enlargement as I can, it seems to be a rolled up sandbag fixed like a Roman Legionnaire's plume.
Still horrifying to me. My grandad, was one of those unlucky sods. A lovelier bloke you couldn't hope meet. To think that he would have to drive 16" of Sheffields finest through someone is very sobering.



Editedforpinotageinducedmongery.
 
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Part of Rawlinson's Army: this is the attack I referenced upthread, but (despite my earlier remarks) , spend a little time reading a day by day catalogue of the actions that made up the Somme offensive, and it becomes clear (and I think Griffith sets this out in his book) that such large-scale attacks were the exception, not the rule, and that for the most part .............

No wonder so many millions turned out for his funeral.

I have visited his grave in Dryburgh Abbey ... his simple headstone copies the standard WW1 design ...

Earl Haigh.jpg
 
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Bordon/hants

Old-Salt
Still horrifying to me. My grandad, was one of those unlucky sods. A lovelier bloke you couldn't hope meet. To think that he would have to drive 16' of Sheffields finest through someone is very sobering.
Like the first time I read about Arnold Ridley and his trench raid wounds, hard to re-concile with the part he played in Dad's Army;

 
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