Photos that make you think.

hamper

Old-Salt
There are better photos in the museum. I went there in the early 80s with a large amount of young Chinese ladies. There are some incredible physical exhibits such as melted aluminium water bottles and the bank steps with the shadow of a person where the granite under the person was rough but the area around the body was glazed.
I was with lovely probationary HKP inspector going around the museum and said to her how awful it was. She said that in H.K. they would never be forgiven for bayonetting babies for fun or for spitting in the street. I leave you to decide.
 
As you drive along the M6 heading north over Birmingham, the old Fort Dunlop building is on your right. Off to the side, on the northern side, is Dunlop Aircraft Tyres, now an independent company no longer affiliated to the Dunlop brand proper (which was bought by Goodyear some time ago).

If you've dropped off the M6 there and come down to the roundabout, there's a skeletal model of a Spitfire. That long, straight road off it heading east, which had to have speed-calming measures put in some years ago, is/was the runway of the Castle Bromwich factory where Spitfires were built.

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When life imprisonment became the replacement for murder the people (I include myself among them) were under the impression that this meant life. That it included provision for parole was not as I remember included. It wasn't discussed openly, if at all.

Murder and crimes against the person cannot be reversed or compensated for. There is no punishment suitable for murder, the best we can do is take the life of the perpetrator. That some have said is not acceptable, if that is true then by the same token is it ever acceptable for them to be allowed to be a part of society. I say not. Their debt to society is never discharged, upon their death the debt merely becomes uncollectable.

A life sentence should be just that, if not call it something else, perhaps "Rehabilitation" would be suitable.
Then of course there is the cost saving £45,000 a year x 20 years, give or take £1m.
Rope and the hangmans time something less. Could be on a percentage. Queue here for an interview.
 

Bordon/hants

Old-Salt
Over 300 reasons not to annoy her......

P.S.....How do you make the images bigger in the post please anyone, I am uploading saved images off my desktop?
 

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giatttt

War Hero
There are better photos in the museum. I went there in the early 80s with a large amount of young Chinese ladies. There are some incredible physical exhibits such as melted aluminium water bottles and the bank steps with the shadow of a person where the granite under the person was rough but the area around the body was glazed.
I was with lovely probationary HKP inspector going around the museum and said to her how awful it was. She said that in H.K. they would never be forgiven for bayonetting babies for fun or for spitting in the street. I leave you to decide.

Thirty years ago (ish) I went round and exhibition in the HK museum of the Japanese occupation. One room was filled with copies of typed witness statements taken after the recapture of HK. The beaches covered with bodies of women and children who had been roped together and then tipped off boats to drown stuck in my mind.

There were worse things documented.
 

syrup

LE
There is/was a series of photographs just inside the main entrance showing the damage.

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View attachment 621213

and during reconstruction

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and today

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Thanks for those pictures very informative but it does partly show the original point that it wasn't completely destroyed.
If it was the aiming point you would expect the lead bombardier with a Nordon site hit it smack on and 35 other bomber drop on his mark hitting about 650m out.
In your last photo the whole area looks to have been rebuilt

I believe Harris attributed Cologne Cathedral surviving due to it being the aiming point
 
Then of course there is the cost saving £45,000 a year x 20 years, give or take £1m.
Rope and the hangmans time something less. Could be on a percentage. Queue here for an interview.
If the death penalty ever were reintroduced, the method would not be the rope.
The protocols and routine in the death cell and execution chamber kept the process of the last couple of minutes very short, and the prisoners stunned and surprised. These procedures were kept secret, but they are now widely known.
Despite claims by hangmen and others, death was not instantaneous. During the Hameln executions in 1945/6 it was decided that the usual practice of leaving bodies on the rope for an hour needed to be shortened in order to get through daily lists. Careful observation showed that heart beats continued for up to half an hour, and in at least one case breathing recommenced after about 20 minutes.
The RAMC BAOR chief pathologist, whose name I cannot remember, recommended that chloroform be injected directly into the heart in order to kill quickly, and this was done in several cases.
This wouldn’t go down awfully well nowadays.
 
In addition to flipping the bomb release switches on the visual prompt from the lead aircraft, a Togglier also had responsibility for removing safety pins from each bomb. This was normally done over the sea on the outward trip once the immediate dangers of mid-air collision during formation were reduced. He also manned the Bendix chin turret, where fitted, or any gun fitted in the Perspex nose cone, both of these tasks being within the normal remit of a fully trained bombardier. However a Togglier was not trained in the use of the complex Norden bombsight, which involved actually flying the aircraft by secondary controls during the bomb run. A bombardier was also trained to assist the navigator, training which was not given to a Togglier.
He was also an enlisted man (sometimes not even an NCO like the rest of the crew) compared to trained Officer Bombardiers.
 
Togglier, a real position:
The togglier was responsible for arming and dropping the bombs in lieu of a bombardier. As the war progressed, the bombing formations would drop when the lead aircraft dropped, and the need for skilled bombardiers decreased. Dropping bombs involved flipping (or toggling) the switch(es) that result in activating the bomb release mechanisms. This is the origin of the title "togglier", a combination of toggle and bombardier. The lead aircraft crew would include a skilled "group" bombardier, and many of the other crews would utilize toggliers...
  1. What is a Bombardier? What is a Togglier?
    A crew bombardier was trained in all the technical phases of the "dropping the bombs" task. It was his job to operate the bomb sight in his plane to drop the bombs on a target.

    However, when it was decreed by 8th AF headquarters that all 36 planes in a Squadron formation would drop their bombs simultaneously, only the bombardier in the lead plane ran a bomb sight and functioned as a true bombardier. All the other 35 planes dropped when he did. The job of the bombardier in all the other 35 planes then was just to trip the bomb release switch in his own plane when the lead dropped his bombs. This method/technique was intended to concentrate the bomb pattern for maximum destruction. So, when there were personnel shortages, some enlisted crew members were selected to sit in the bombardier's position and timely trip the switch when the lead plane dropped his bombs. That job was called a togglier, sometimes spelled toggleier, a combination of toggle + ier.


 
1944 101st Airborne division POWS of the germans being fed

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The French slapping US POW's in Paris

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Bordon/hants

Old-Salt
Prefer the not quite so massive but still expensive Brit type myself (maybe the badge helps).
 

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