Photos that make you think.

Hexi Bloke

War Hero
hiroshima
Unknown-1.jpeg
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
It's the entrance to Brook Park. That particular little stretch of road leads up to the old Rosemount shirt factory. A useful harboring-up location for the Bogside, just off to the left of picture or again to the Creggan estate zone via Rosemount.
There was until a few years ago a fixed military base in the Rosemount, not that far from the photo's location.
I once took a very VIP convoy to Rosemount in about 1984 and, having not really remembered the recce notes mistakenly turned into a small supermarket car park before the actual base which led to an embarrassed silence in the Granada.

The senior chap in the back then said 'young Bubbles, you do know I've come to visit the troops and not go shopping?'
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
In Birmingham at Castle Bromwich they named streets after Battle of Britain aircraft, RAF Stations and pilots.

It at least showed there was probably one ex Military bloke involved with a black sense of humour

What shall we call the Pedestrian only walkway then?

View attachment 621020
As you drive along the M6 heading north over Birmingham, the old Fort Dunlop building is on your right. Off to the side, on the northern side, is Dunlop Aircraft Tyres, now an independent company no longer affiliated to the Dunlop brand proper (which was bought by Goodyear some time ago).

If you've dropped off the M6 there and come down to the roundabout, there's a skeletal model of a Spitfire. That long, straight road off it heading east, which had to have speed-calming measures put in some years ago, is/was the runway of the Castle Bromwich factory where Spitfires were built.
 

BlipDriver

War Hero
Good point.
The USAAF tried to maintain the fiction of pinpoint accuracy. It played better at home. Press releases were careful to mention that a target was a particular military or economic objective instead of simply a city area.
Some aircrew comforted themselves with the idea that, whilst accepting collateral damage, they were at least trying to hit genuine military/economic targets. A watershed moment came in a raid on Munster in 1943, May I think (I’ll check and edit.) The raid was taking place on a Sunday, time on target 1200, aiming point was the Domplatz, the public square in front of the cathedral. Just as worshippers would be leaving.
Many American fliers were very uneasy, but I know of at least one who tried to refuse to fly, but was threatened with disciplinary action if he did not go.
Biggest raid on Münster was Sunday 10th October 1943 median aiming point the steps of the cathedral, was this the one you were thinking of?
Covered very extensively in Munster: The way it was by Ian Hawkins
Amazon productAmazon product
 

hamper

Old-Salt
Back in the days when we still hanged folk, we hanged a few 'bang to rights' ones who turned out to be innocent, too.


It doesn't. DNA evidence was used to jail David Butler of murder.

There isn't and never will be any such thing as infallible evidence so long as human beings are involved.
When life imprisonment became the replacement for murder the people (I include myself among them) were under the impression that this meant life. That it included provision for parole was not as I remember included. It wasn't discussed openly, if at all.

Murder and crimes against the person cannot be reversed or compensated for. There is no punishment suitable for murder, the best we can do is take the life of the perpetrator. That some have said is not acceptable, if that is true then by the same token is it ever acceptable for them to be allowed to be a part of society. I say not. Their debt to society is never discharged, upon their death the debt merely becomes uncollectable.

A life sentence should be just that, if not call it something else, perhaps "Rehabilitation" would be suitable.
 
Biggest raid on Münster was Sunday 10th October 1943 median aiming point the steps of the cathedral, was this the one you were thinking of?
Covered very extensively in Munster: The way it was by Ian Hawkins
Amazon productAmazon product
That’s the one.
It was the third mission in three days for many of the Bombardment Groups, Bremen on October 8th, Marienburg on the 9th, then Munster on the 10th.
The 100th earned their nickname, “The Bloody Hundredth” on this sequence of raids: on the 10th they were only able to field thirteen bombers after losses on the previous two days.
Back at their base, Thorpe Abbots, ground personnel were “sweating them in” awaiting the return of their planes. The first was Royal Flush with a recently arrived crew piloted by Lt Robert “Rosie” Rosenthal. This was not their own plane, as “Rosies Riveters” had been damaged during the Bremen and Marienburg missions.
Royal Flush came in on two engines with a large hole in the wing from an air to air rocket, firing red flares to indicate wounded aboard.
As the vigil continued it became clear that Royal Flush was not just the first, but the only survivor of the thirteen B-17s that the 100th had sent out that morning.

Rosenthal went on to have a charmed life, though shot down twice and wounded. He volunteered to keep flying after his first and second tours. In 1945, by now a Major, he was Mission Commander on the great raid on Berlin on February 3rd, when the loathsome Nazi judge Roland Freisler was killed. Rosenthal was shot down on this mission, but managed to reach Russian lines before bailing out.
The Hanks/Spielberg epic currently in production as “Masters of the Air focuses on the 100th and Rosenthal.
 
Last edited:
In addition to flipping the bomb release switches on the visual prompt from the lead aircraft, a Togglier also had responsibility for removing safety pins from each bomb. This was normally done over the sea on the outward trip once the immediate dangers of mid-air collision during formation were reduced. He also manned the Bendix chin turret, where fitted, or any gun fitted in the Perspex nose cone, both of these tasks being within the normal remit of a fully trained bombardier. However a Togglier was not trained in the use of the complex Norden bombsight, which involved actually flying the aircraft by secondary controls during the bomb run. A bombardier was also trained to assist the navigator, training which was not given to a Togglier.

How was it pronounced? Its sounding as Tog-Lee-Eh in my head but imagine it was Toggle-Ear?
 

BlipDriver

War Hero
That’s the one.
It was the third mission in three days for many of the Bombardment Groups, Bremen on October 8th, Marienburg on the 9th, then Munster on the 10th.
The 100th earned their nickname, “The Bloody Hundredth” on this sequence of raids: on the 10th they were only able to field thirteen bombers after losses on the previous two days.
Back at their base, Thorpe Abbots, ground personnel were “sweating them in” awaiting the return of their planes. The first was Royal Flush with a recently arrived crew piloted by Lt Robert “Rosie” Rosenberg. This was not their own plane, as “Rosies Riveters” had been damaged during the Bremen and Marienburg missions.
Royal Flush came in on two engines with a large hole in the wing from an air to air rocket, firing red flares to indicate wounded aboard.
As the vigil continued it became clear that Royal Flush was not just the first, but the only survivor of the thirteen B-17s that the 100th had sent out that morning.

Rosenberg went on to have a charmed life, though shot down twice and wounded. He volunteered to keep flying after his first and second tours. In 1945, by now a Major, he was Mission Commander on the great raid on Berlin on February 3rd, when the loathsome Nazi judge Roland Freisler was killed. Rosenberg was shot down on this mission, but managed to reach Russian lines before bailing out.
The Hanks/Spielberg epic currently in production as “Masters of the Air focuses on the 100th and Rosenberg.
Got a copy of the book I mentioned a few months ago, just can't spot it at the moment; by any chance have you stumbled across this - Royal Flush ‹ HistoricWings.com :: A Magazine for Aviators, Pilots and Adventurers I only found it last month & it covers the raid.
It does have a few errors, such as giving the Dom a spire (actually St. Lamberti) but very informative.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top