Photos that make you think.

Tool

LE
A photo which appears frequently but about which I can't find any definitive information.

The farthest sub is clearly an RN boat but the nearest appears to be a USN Sturgeon class, given the masts and the planes on the sail.

View attachment 606900
"An RAF Nimrod MR2 on patrol in the skies over the North Pole, it is shown with two RN submarines just breaking through the ice.", MoD/Crown copyright 2002, Media ID 15230381.
Or

Nimrod MR.2 XV235, submarine hunting, North Pole, 1995; Sgt Rick Brewell/RAF (Thunder & Lightnings - Hawker Siddeley Nimrod - History)

Or even
"The Nimrod on display at the Museum, XV235, started life as the original MR1 variant before being upgraded to MR2 standard. It saw active service during both Gulf Wars and also operated in the Arctic Circle, where it made a rendezvous with the submarines HMS Trenchant and USS Spadefish at the North Pole. The fuselage is an outdoor exhibit and is open to the public for cockpit tours."
(Avro Heritage Museum | Woodford | Nimrod XV235 Cockpit)

As you say, confusing.

**Edit to add a bit more:
USS Spadefish SSN-668 (foreground) and HMS Trenchant S-91 seen at the North Pole in 1992.


Sufficient info out there to identify all three vessels and approximate date.
 
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Whilst on the subject, in Holland in early 1945 1st Canadian Army allowed German prisoners to convene a court martial to try two Kriegsmarine matroosen for desertion. A death penalty was imposed, and the Canadians gave the Germans all the facilities to carry it out, including transport to an execution site and providing rifles to the German PoW firing squad.
 
Whilst on the subject, in Holland in early 1945 1st Canadian Army allowed German prisoners to convene a court martial to try two Kriegsmarine matroosen for desertion. A death penalty was imposed, and the Canadians gave the Germans all the facilities to carry it out, including transport to an execution site and providing rifles to the German PoW firing squad.
Being the basis of the worst war movie ever made

"The Fifth Day of Peace" (aka Gott mitt uns) with the subtle Franco Nero as one of the German deserters

 

RTU'd

LE
Why the DM specifically?
They just love to run a sensational story & get the curtain twitching readers ready for doom.
Its not responsible journalism by them & they just write it & then get sued, a lot.
Often settling out of court as not to make the fecktarded home counties set realise they are rumour mongers.
 
A full and informative answer on the issue of blank round(s) to a firing squad.


This bit makes sense:

Again we see the reasoning behind the issue of a blank cartridge, as well as emphasis on the importance of firing simultaneously. This is meant to be a group effort in which no one individual is wholly responsible.
In Europe where many militaries used a wooden bullet in there blanks it might make sense, the US Blank was simply a slightly crimped case mouth with a cardboard disk
 
In Europe where many militaries used a wooden bullet in there blanks it might make sense, the US Blank was simply a slightly crimped case mouth with a cardboard disk
I also remember the .303 blank was just crimped.
 

QRK2

LE
20 years or more ago, when Kew was the PRO and not NA I retrieved a short file which listed British servicemen executed after courts martial from 1941-1953. I took a copy, but no longer have it, though ISTR the reference being WO 93/40 (or 94/30).
There were about 15 names on the list, all were convicted of murder, and two or three were listed as shot. Sorry I can't be more specific.

When Edward Heath published his memoirs he claimed to have been in charge of the execution by shooting of a Polish soldier. Again, that is just a memory I have, but newspaper reviews mentioned it quite widely. Reference is made to it in his Wiki entry, viz. "Heath later remarked that, although he did not personally kill anybody, as the British forces advanced he saw the devastation caused by his unit's artillery bombardments. In September 1945 he commanded a firing squad that executed a Polish soldier convicted of rape and murder.[21] He was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire, Military Division (MBE) on 24 January 1946.[22] He was demobilised in August 1946 and promoted to the substantive rank of lieutenant-colonel on 1 May 1947.[23]"

I know 3.7" AA were occasionally used in a ground role but " devastation caused by his unit's artillery bombardments." is pushing it a bit.
 
Pierrepoint was not present at any of those American hangings, which took place at Landsberg, Bruchsal and Rheinbach.
3 of the Rheinbach hangings were civilians who murdered shot down liberator crewmen at Priest

Life magazine covered the trail and hangings. they had been encouraged by Peter Back a limping little nazi party member who shot one of the crewmen 2 times before the crewmans head was crushed by a stone hammer

 
I also remember the .303 blank was just crimped.
The standard rifle blank was a simple rose crimp and so the cartridge overall length was shorter than the ball round. This was ok in a bolt action rifle, but they would not slide up the feed ramp in an automatic weapon. The solution was the light wooden "blue nose" bulleted blank which worked a Bren quite well.
 
They just love to run a sensational story & get the curtain twitching readers ready for doom.
Its not responsible journalism by them & they just write it & then get sued, a lot.
Often settling out of court as not to make the fecktarded home counties set realise they are rumour mongers.
Very often they are simply a mouth-piece for anyone who wants to get their story across.
Typically,
'Soldier selling medal to fund house/avoid starving - invariably two things are included, the name of the advertisers auctioneers and the expected price will be seriously undervalued, creating more interest.

Victim takes case to industrial/discrimination tribunal represented by same firm of no-win, no fee lawyers, whose name crops up in almost every advert article If the plaintiff wins, another article will appear trumpeting success, if they lose, you won't hear about it.

"My new wife is being deported when I've lived here all my life- not a word about why's she's failed independent tribunals.

I headline scan the online Daily Express now, it's not much cop as a newspaper and it's Harry and Megan obsessed but at least it doesn't try to manipulate public opinion as much as the Mail does.
 
I don't set much store by Woods' claim to have deliberately bodged the jobs, it sounds more like a damage-limitation exercise by him to cover his failures.
Most accounts of Woods state that he lied about his qualifications for the job and in fact had none, it's also claimed that he bodged the executions of US servicemen in France so no self-righteous Nazi factor there.
Nasty piece of work.
I have read that the problem arose from the initial observation of the prisoners when the "Drop" was measured.

Over the months of the trials the prisoners, on less rich diets, lost weight. This meant the "drop" figure became inadequate.
 
I have read that the problem arose from the initial observation of the prisoners when the "Drop" was measured.

Over the months of the trials the prisoners, on less rich diets, lost weight. This meant the "drop" figure became inadequate.
Except Wood botched several hangings of US servicemen as well who weren't imprisoned for long periods prior to the necktie party
 

Chef

LE
The standard rifle blank was a simple rose crimp and so the cartridge overall length was shorter than the ball round. This was ok in a bolt action rifle, but they would not slide up the feed ramp in an automatic weapon. The solution was the light wooden "blue nose" bulleted blank which worked a Bren quite well.
The unbulleted blanks had a tendency to jam unless the magazine lips were widened slightly. Strictly verboten but cadets and pliers will have their way.

In this clip from 'Temple of doom' at about 7.20 the extra has trouble with his weapon.
Using No 4s in pre war India, one for the spotters.
 
The common system in use in Europe was far worse. The prisoner had the noose placed whilst stood on the ground or solid surface (no trapdoor), and then was hauled up onto the gibbet like a sack of spuds. As this usually failed to break the neck, the prisoner was left being strangled slowly in agony. It was a duty of the executioner(s) to assist the process by hanging onto the legs if necessary. No wonder many of the executions were horribly botched.
Isn't the current Iranian system a similar method? Except they use cranes for the lifting and don't bother about adding weight to the prisoner.
 
In Europe where many militaries used a wooden bullet in there blanks it might make sense, the US Blank was simply a slightly crimped case mouth with a cardboard disk
Yup. usually daubed with red paint too; or at least the ones I remember were.
 
The unbulleted blanks had a tendency to jam unless the magazine lips were widened slightly. Strictly verboten but cadets and pliers will have their way.

In this clip from 'Temple of doom' at about 7.20 the extra has trouble with his weapon.
Using No 4s in pre war India, one for the spotters.
Dont watch "The Blue Max" then. Apparently the entire Imperial German Army circa 1915-1918 used No.4's with No. 9 Bayonets

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Also Spandau's in the flick was Swedish M45 SMG's fitted into spandau covers
 
A few to think about.

On August 18th 1944 the 466th Bombardment Group at Attlebridge threw one hell of a party.
The occasion was the completion of 100 combat missions. The base was thrown open during the day for local people, and sporting events like this trotting race gave the GIs the chance for a bit of gambling.


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The evening went with a swing too - Glenn Miller's Army Air Force Band were flown in (and yes, they did play In the Mood!) along with Rudy Starita's All Girl Orchestra for a Hangar Hop to which 1000 girls had been invited. Colonel Jimmy Stewart dropped by just to add a bit of Hollywood glamour, and the beer was free (the Group officers had chipped in to have 50,000 pints delivered in the wood for the enlisted men.)

The American's reputation for looking after local kids . . . . . ., well, they did that all the time anyway, but the Group Met Officer wasn't going to miss the odd extra weather balloon on the big day.

media-380741.jpg

These three little girls, Janet Townshend, Tessa Grant and her sister Gloria were from the nearby village of Hockering. Perhaps they are still alive today, in their 80s - who knows ?

But on these bases there was always an undercurrent of sadness or foreboding. Look at the aircraft serial number of that Liberator - 295592. That identifies her as Black Cat.


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It's just a guess, but maybe she was used as a backdrop because her nose art was decent enough to appear in a photo with a group of children.

Anyway, Black Cat eventually had a claim to fame. Eight months later she would be the very last B-24 of the Eighth Air Force to be lost to enemy action. (Possibly the last heavy - I don't know. Room for more research into the last B-17 lost, if I am spared long enough.)

Black Cat was lost on April 21st 1945 whilst on a mission to Salzburg. She was hit by flak near Regensburg which tore off the efficient but vulnerable Liberator Davis wing.
She came down near the village of Oberhinkofen just south of Regensburg. Two crew members managed to parachute to safety and a brief period of captivity. In a touching acknowledgement to reconciliation the villagers erected this memorial, which they still care for, at the crash site in memory of the lost crew members. The strange entry "George NDE" on the plaque is obviously from a misreading of George Noe who was 1/Lt navigator. For non-German speakers, the words at the bottom mean "To the memory of all victims of war."


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This is the Farrington crew, ten of whom died in the crash of Black Cat. The two survivors, 1/Lt Chris Manners (Bombardier - moustache) and S/Sgt Albert Seraydarian (Tail Gunner - hands together) are standing and kneeling extreme right. John C Wiesner (named on the plaque) is not in this photo. I think this is another spelling mistake - the Missing Air Crew report shows a Captain Louis C Weiser. He was flying in the co-pilot's seat as a Command Pilot, so was not a regular member of Farrington's crew.
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In 2005 the US Postal Service issued a 37 cent stamp showing Black Cat as the last US bomber shot down in WW2

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