Photos that make you think.

Proff3RTR

Old-Salt
I always thought that it was a southern thing. One of the first things that I noticed when I moved to Dorset in 95 was the locals saying "of" instead of "have". It wasn't a thing in my part of the north east, hence it sticking out like a sore thumb.
Really, that is something I did not notice to be honest, just always said it that way looking back over the years, not sure if it’s a context thing or just how it is.
 
The fella at the back is yelling, "I'll give you one fackin' sausage..."
The fella at the back does not appear to have had only one of any breakfast component.
 

Tool

LE
Pissed up weekends, and the Sunday return.
Most cars on the road after 6pm were full of 'troopies' heading inland from the coast, desperate to make base at 23h59.
One weekend, the cops near Bloemfontein set up a roadblock, which delayed a lot of guys for an hour or two.
Ended up being a big scandal.
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A group of my brother and some friends were given a weekend off from Louis Trichardt. They decided to hitch-hike to Kiptown and back, the only stipulation being that they got something to prove they had been in said city. For those geographically challenged. Look at Polokwane near the Zimbabwe border, and then Cape Town. The distance is 1,000 miles (about 1,600 km) EACH WAY.
 
I took this photo at one of the places I deliver to.
I'd really like to think that on the other side of that door, is a sign above it that says-
'Failed Applicants This Way.'

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The graves of a Catholic woman and her Protestant husband, who were not allowed to be buried together. On the Protestant part of this cemetery J.W.C van Gorcum, colonel of the Dutch Cavalry and militia commissioner in Limburg is buried. His wife, lady J.C.P.H van Aefferden is buried in the Catholic part. They were married in 1842, he was a protestant and didn’t belong to the nobility. This caused quite a commotion in Roermond. After being married for 38 years the colonel died in 1880 and was buried on the protestant part of the cemetery against the wall. His wife died in 1888 and had decided not to be buried in the family tomb but on the other side of the wall, the closest she could get to her husband. Two clasped hands connect the graves across the wall.
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Fritze Thyssen was sent to Sachsenhausen than to Dachau as an inmate because he refused to serve the Reich. His factories seized. His German Citizenship personally stripped by Hitler in Dec 1939. He was finally liberated in 1945 by the US 42nd Division.

That's not the entire story though, is it?

He was quite happy to fund the Nazi party and personally persecute Jews in his employment.

His subsequent change of heart came about when Catholics began being persecuted, of which he was a leading member.
 
That's not the entire story though, is it?

He was quite happy to fund the Nazi party and personally persecute Jews in his employment.

His subsequent change of heart came about when Catholics began being persecuted, of which he was a leading member.
Not quite the truth though

Thyssen (a March Violet in the party vernacular)resigned from the NSDAP the day after Kristallnacht, 1938.

He didnt actually fund Hitler. The "I paid Hitler" book was not written by him, but by a Hungarian-Jewish writer under the employ of the British propaganda offices (PWE) allegedly using Thyssen's memoirs in 1940

He fled Germany before the war started, sent notes to Goering among others decrying the coming war. In December 1939 Had his citizenship Personally stripped by Hitler and his assets seized by the Reich

Jews were persecuted/slave laborers at his factories AFTER the factories were seized and under state control. His denazification trial found him basically innocent since he had only fired Jews previously. he did pay an indemnity for those actions while he was head of his factories
 

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