Photos that make you think.

Waldeck

Old-Salt
Had a bit of experience “wrangling” cattle, on a friends farm de-horning very young calves, just restraining them before any surgery took place was difficult enough, I could just about do it on my own.

Second experience was at the Ralston Rodeo when on BATUS staff, we were encouraged to enter the steer wrangling competition (sure it was purely for the entertainment of the locals) it took three of us to bring the steer down and restrain the little bugger, afterwards it felt like having done 10 rounds combined with having been at the bottom of a 45 min ruck (old style where shoeing was allowed), we did not win.
This rodeo would allow you in free if you take photos that get published. You get a press card, all you have to do is let them have copies of the photos.
After the rodeo proper when the public have left, They open it up for people who would like to have a go. The kid in the photos below had a go, he got crushed between a small steer and the guard rail. His Dad also in one of the photos just picked him up shouting "he's ok, he's ok", he did not check him over to see if he had broken any thing.
Being a bit worried for the kid I tried to find out how he was. I was never invited back to take photo's. Think it's a case of shut the ++++ up. Or maybe they didn't like my photos, Nar couldn't be that!
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Not strictly true, the French prisoners had to undergo re-education in the camps under the communists, a lot enduring harsh treatment and subsequently dying. It isn`t a simple case of them not being able to survive on a handful of rice.
There were also several thousand Japanese stay behinds from WW2, several helping to run the Viet Minh training academy, and others leading VM troops into battle. Some were from the hated Kempetai, so there is a fair chance of them meting out summary justice.
Most of this is covered in Martin Windrows "The Last Valley".
Then there were French communists such as this piece of shit.... Georges Boudarel
There's also tales of the colonial troops being separated and indoctrinated to foster anti-French risings in their homelands. See Bernard Fall's Indo-China books amongst other sources - he blame a lot of the Algerian unrest on repatriated colonial troops.
 
I've worked cattle before - don't I know it! While I can't speak for the States, in Australia McDonalds would take the stuff the dog meat people wouldn't touch.

Separately, trying to catch a beast by the horns and throw it? Is why I no longer have a tooth that sticks up above the rest.
Many, many years ago I worked on a cattle ranch in Colombia.

We tied their front feet and then back feet together, looped a rope around all four and pulled hard whilst giving the cow a good shove in the shoulder. That way they fell over fast and couldn’t kick when we stuck the brand in or sawed off the horns. We did it for slaughter as well, shoving a BFO knife in through near the collar bones to stop them wriggling around too much whilst we caught the blood in a bucket for sausages.

Getting kicked by a big angry cow really, really hurts.
 
I did read that the Viet Cong had captured a journalist, somewhere NE of Saigon in the 60s. And ended up letting him go, as he was eating them out of house and home.
 

Waldeck

Old-Salt
The first photo, "The Falling Man" is so tragic. All ways reminds me of the song by Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris; "If This is Goodbye" on their All the Road running CD/DVD.
 
A bleak. chilly day at Shipdham, home to the 44th Heavy Bombardment Group, Monday 22nd November1943.
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The occasion was the award ceremony of the Medal of Honor to the 44th's Commanding Officer, Colonel Leon W Johnson for his actions at Ploesti, Rumania on 1 August 1943.
Three Liberator Groups from the Second Air Division in Norfolk had been detached to the Ninth AF in North Africa in June, and all took part in the celebrated but costly ultra low level oilfield attack, Op TIDAL WAVE, which was mounted from Benghazi.

Four Medals of Honor were awarded to men of the Norfolk based Groups; Johnson's was the only one which was not posthumous.

This next pic shows Colonel Johnson (left) wearing his medal at the neck talking to Lt General Jake Devers, Commander ETOUSA who had carried out the presentation. He is pointing to the unique raid icon for TIDAL WAVE, a horizontal bomb (we didn't drop 'em, we laid 'em.)
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The Liberator in this pic is not the one in which Johnson flew the raid. As Group CO he rode in Suzy Q piloted by Lt Bob Brown. Here she is, another time, another place:-

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Before she could return from the detachment, Suzy Q was lost to fighter attack on a mission to Foggia on 16 August 1943. All ten men aboard were killed.

The man on the right in the second photo is Major General Ira C Eaker, CG VIII Bomber Command, one of the original seven officers who flew to England via Lisbon eight weeks after Pearl Harbor to commence the colossal task of establishing what became the Mighty Eighth. He was a modest, soft spoken Texan. When asked to say some words to a public meeting at High Wycombe, he simply stood up and said, "We won't do much talking until we've done some more fighting. When we go, we hope you'll be glad that we came."
 
Apropro of nothing in particular.

Khe Sahn 'field kitchen' March 1968.

If they had been in the possession of some medium range puffing billy's then the outcome might have been very different. Egg banjo anyone?

image khe sahn.jpg
 

HE117

LE
Apropro of nothing in particular.

Khe Sahn 'field kitchen' March 1968.

If they had been in the possession of some medium range puffing billy's then the outcome might have been very different. Egg banjo anyone?

View attachment 563515
We borrowed one of those field kitchen sets from the USAF for an exped in the 70s.. they were very good and included a number of puffing billies as well as the field oven units shown here. Our tame ACC sprout mechanic took a few days to get his head around how they worked, but produced some cracking meals on the kit. We cooked a full christmas dinner on it complete with turkey and all the trimmings for everyone on the DZ..
 
but produced some cracking meals on the kit. We cooked a full christmas dinner on it complete with turkey and all the trimmings for everyone on the DZ..
Did you ever find out what happened to those two missing sniffer dogs?
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
A great link, thank you.
 
The field ovens M59 have been kicking around since WW II but they are capable of some pretty good results in the hands of mess sergeants who know how to operate them safely. The heart of the oven is the gasoline burner unit M2 NSN 7310-00-842-9247 and there have been some improvements over the years. There is even a version with a safety device but it's still caught out many an unwary KP attempting to light the bastard with a bang and a WOOOSH as it tries to burn the world down around his ears, (much to my amusement). The immersion heaters are good for a laugh too what with their drip feed carburetors. 8):lol::lol::lol:

Look at that fooker with the tab in his lip about to ladle some disgusting thing out of that pot. Mystery meat stew no doubt.
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Not strictly true, the French prisoners had to undergo re-education in the camps under the communists, a lot enduring harsh treatment and subsequently dying. It isn`t a simple case of them not being able to survive on a handful of rice.
There were also several thousand Japanese stay behinds from WW2, several helping to run the Viet Minh training academy, and others leading VM troops into battle. Some were from the hated Kempetai, so there is a fair chance of them meting out summary justice.
Most of this is covered in Martin Windrows "The Last Valley".
Then there were French communists such as this piece of shit.... Georges Boudarel

Painful reading. PoS doesn't even come close.
 
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