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Photos that make you think.

This we know. Spike Milligan did a diagram explaining you. Much less percentage of football involved than yer Jerry equivalent.
 
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Were there any attractive women pre 1950?

The majority of the women photographed in an earlier era, looked like more manly versions of Hinge and Bracket.

There were beautiful women throughout history. Mostly upper class, nobility etc. Just look at all the stunners in Pre-Raphaelite paintings.

Sadly, the other 99% of women might have started out pretty but poor diet, smallpox, scurvy, rickets, bad housing, no dentistry, poor sanitation, a sprog every 18 months, zero medical care etc left them hag like pretty quickly.
 
There were beautiful women throughout history. Mostly upper class, nobility etc. Just look at all the stunners in Pre-Raphaelite paintings.

Sadly, the other 99% of women might have started out pretty but poor diet, smallpox, scurvy, rickets, bad housing, no dentistry, poor sanitation, a sprog every 18 months, zero medical care etc left them hag like pretty quickly.

Keep going, nearly there
 
I agree with your post apart from the emboldened bit.

It is generally agreed that the world's first clinical trial* was done by James Lind, a naval surgeon,, in the mid 1700s.

He took a dozen sailors with scurvy, split them into six groups and gave each group the standard diet plus a ration of either cider, vinegar, seawater, oranges and lemons and a few other things.

He ran out of fruit after a week but the fruit group were almost fully recovered by then. I think the cider group improved a bit. The rest, well, not so much.

So pretty much an ethical standardised trial for which we will forever be known as Limeys by the colonials.

One of the many crap bits of human evolution was losing the ability to synthesise Vitamin C.



* There are a few examples of a Russian tsar and a Persian king experimenting on soldiers but as this involved killing half of them they were not exactly ethical. I guess they didn't GAF though.

IIRC The Admiralty ignored his findings for something like 100 years? The foundation stone of MoD thinking right there.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
You’d be surprised how low my standards are, they look ok to me
Well it looks like you turned one down, she’s on her knees crying. If you listen carefully she’s saying....”I can’t believe he said I won’t“.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Sadly, the other 99% of women might have started out pretty but poor diet, smallpox, scurvy, rickets, bad housing, no dentistry, poor sanitation, a sprog every 18 months, zero medical care etc left them hag like pretty quickly.

"Flowers of Scotland,
When will we see
Their likes again ?"
 
There were beautiful women throughout history. Mostly upper class, nobility etc. Just look at all the stunners in Pre-Raphaelite paintings.

Sadly, the other 99% of women might have started out pretty but poor diet, smallpox, scurvy, rickets, bad housing, no dentistry, poor sanitation, a sprog every 18 months, zero medical care etc left them hag like pretty quickly.

But apart from that, what have...
 
"Flowers of Scotland,
When will we see
Their likes again ?"

The following briefing was given to the crew of a Viking raiding vessel moored off Aberdeen during their “adventurous” years.

“Right lads, as you know the recce party has returned and had a word with the Skipper and I’m pleased to announce that tomorrow’s raid will be pillage only”
 
I wonder how far medicine would have advanced if the standards of today were to be applied throughout history?

I believe a lot of medical data on cold, heat and decompression was produced by the Nazis should it be used?

Likewise, I recall a TV programme where it was mentioned that if modern medical research practices were to be applied the RN would have had to wait a couple of centuries before scurvy could be treated with vitamin C.

Ans as @gorillaguts981 mentions the lad was paid for his participation and his name recorded, just like modern drug trials.
And as terrible and appalling the medical experiments were that the Japanese conducted against Chinese and Allied POWs in Unit 731 during the Second World War, the research has value today. It was probably why the head of that unit was dealt with by the Americans at wars end more leniently than he deserved.
 
My grandad was working forty hours a day eleven weeks to the month to mine anthracite for 'war.
Killed him eventually.

Never really knew more than a shell of the the guy. :(

Was your grandad Diane Abbott?
 

Chef

LE
There was concern early in the war that US citizens might fall foul of the US Neutrality Acts, but it soon became apparent that the US Government were quite willing to turn a blind eye. The RAF established the so-called Eagle Squadrons, and you'll see that Keough is displaying his ES badge on his sleeve in that photo I posted upthread which I think is dated 31st October 1940. The three buddies in that pic, Tobin, Mamedoff and Keough had all originally joined the French Armee de l'Air in 1939, somewhat in the style of the Escadrille Lafayette of WW1.

I'd say that most US fliers who had joined the RAF eventually transferred to the USAAF once the Eighth and Ninth Air Forces were up and running, say from August 1942. There seems to be a large number making the move in the early weeks of 1943 but of the canonical 11 US Few only one did, a chap called Depeyster Brown. Nine of the 11 were dead before 1943 rolled around.

There were those who chose to stay with the RAF/RCAF out of a sense of loyalty - one of the best known, perhaps being Joe McCarthy, captain of the only Dambusting Lancaster to reach and attack the Sorpe Dam.

Those who did transfer were authorised to wear RAF pilots wings on the right breast of their American uniforms.

I read somewhere that when the US entered the war and started hovering up the RAF Americans one of their number went off for a few days and returned to see his old mates in a spiffing new uniform with a load of medals/ribbons on it and a whacking great pay rise.
 
I remember seeing a picture a few years ago of a skull a US marine had posted home to his sweetheart! Imagine showing yr grandchildren that souvenir.
Edit, found it tho sender was a swabbie
My maternal Grandad, 14th Army (Retd), had the top dome of a human skull that he kept on his roll top desk. He used it as an ashtray and for something to knock out his pipe in. He got it from a Japanese gentleman who, ahem, had no need of it anymore.

He also had a human thigh bone that had been converted into a sort of recorder like musical instrument. When the mood took him, generally after a couple of stiff after dinner pegs, he would play "Old MacDonald had a Farm" on it. There were other tunes in his repertoire of course, but that was his favourite.
 
Of course by experimenting he meant infecting his servant's kid with cowpox and then seeing if it would protect him when the boy was infected by Jenner with smallpox. It did thankfully, but there's a frikkin' serious ethical and moral deficiency there somewhere.
Eggs n omelettes
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Clint Eastwood
Skateboarding through Rome
1965
I didnt realise they had them that far back
41f09190d43c7ae0582db17a24ca6b52.jpg
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
I read somewhere that when the US entered the war and started hovering up the RAF Americans one of their number went off for a few days and returned to see his old mates in a spiffing new uniform with a load of medals/ribbons on it and a whacking great pay rise.
A RAF Pilot Officer in 1940 was on about £250 per annum, call that US$ 1000. An American 2/Lt aircrew was on $250 per month/$3000 per annum.
 
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