Photos that make you think.

syrup

LE
I always thought that Turpin was identified by his handwriting. He wrote to his brother or brother in law in Essex and his former teacher identified him that way.

I think that was at his trial I do remember his former teacher did give evidence that it was his handwriting, but I also read somewhere (might have been in the museum in York) that he was identified as he had a pox marked face

Here we go


He's one of England's most notorious criminals and Dick Turpin along with his horse, Black Bess, have ridden into legend.

The real man though was very different to the legend as a new exhibition at York's Castle Museum will reveal.

As part of the exhibition a modern police e-fit of the highwayman has been commissioned.

The picture reveals the real face of Turpin for the first time and he was certainly not a romantic hero.


With no drawings or paintings of Turpin surviving, police used descriptions from the London Gazette newspaper in 1735 and 1737, when a reward for his capture was offered. One article, published on June 21 1737 and offering a reward of £200, read:

"Richard Turpin was born at Thacksted, in the county of Essex, is about 30 years of age, by trade a butcher, about 5ft 9ins high, of a brown complexion, very much marked with the smallpox, his cheek bones broad, his face slimmer towards the bottom, his visage short, pretty upright and broad about the shoulders."

The new picture shows a man with broad cheeks and a narrow chin, wearing a light-coloured wig and with heavy small pox scarring to his face. The poster claims he is wanted for murder, burglary, highway robbery and horse-stealing. A marked contrast to the modern-day romantic image of Turpin as a dashing, devilishly handsome rogue and heroic highwayman.

 
I think that was at his trial I do remember his former teacher did give evidence that it was his handwriting, but I also read somewhere (might have been in the museum in York) that he was identified as he had a pox marked face

Here we go


He's one of England's most notorious criminals and Dick Turpin along with his horse, Black Bess, have ridden into legend.

The real man though was very different to the legend as a new exhibition at York's Castle Museum will reveal.

As part of the exhibition a modern police e-fit of the highwayman has been commissioned.

The picture reveals the real face of Turpin for the first time and he was certainly not a romantic hero.


With no drawings or paintings of Turpin surviving, police used descriptions from the London Gazette newspaper in 1735 and 1737, when a reward for his capture was offered. One article, published on June 21 1737 and offering a reward of £200, read:

"Richard Turpin was born at Thacksted, in the county of Essex, is about 30 years of age, by trade a butcher, about 5ft 9ins high, of a brown complexion, very much marked with the smallpox, his cheek bones broad, his face slimmer towards the bottom, his visage short, pretty upright and broad about the shoulders."

The new picture shows a man with broad cheeks and a narrow chin, wearing a light-coloured wig and with heavy small pox scarring to his face. The poster claims he is wanted for murder, burglary, highway robbery and horse-stealing. A marked contrast to the modern-day romantic image of Turpin as a dashing, devilishly handsome rogue and heroic highwayman.

He should have stuck to lupins...
 
It was the clear complexions and rosy cheeks of milkmaids and farm girls that saw so many of them married off to lords and other wealthy men. They would rather have a lovely smooth faced farmers daughter than a pock marked aristocratic bird with a mush like the lunar surface.

About the only example of upward social mobility in Britain until the Beatles, Stones etc. in the sixties.
It would help to widen the "gene pool", I suppose.
 

4Mercia

Crow
I’m new here, literally made an account just to comment on this thread. I have been lurking this entire site for a few months (since lockdown got unbearable) and I have viewed this particular thread from start to now in the last few days, I just wanted to say what a pleasure it has been. I haven’t served, not yet atleast, but I have really enjoyed viewing the photos and discussion here, so thank you very much!
 
It made me think J*** C****! And if he survived he'd have terrible scars.

Should use that in a poster campaign directed at the moonbats.
ISTR that one of the terrible features of smallpox was that scarring was by no means a certainty? Aside from simply surviving, itself no certainty, the survivors were then left with the dreadful uncertainty of whether or not they’d look like a welder’s bench.

I‘d imagine this was much more a practical rather than cosmetic issue then ratger than today too. With no welfare state, getting married and / or a job were the only means of supporting yourself and at a guess chances of both were unlikely to be enhanced by terrible disfigurement.

Polio was a similarly unpredictable disease. Many experienced not much more than flu like symptoms but others died and yet others faced arguably a worse fate, years confined to truly primitive treatment in iron lungs.

I’m not sure about smallpox but polio was effectively eradicated in my lifetime. I can remember the sugar lump with the vaccine on it as a kid and in later life, a tutor at Woolwich who was appallingly crippled by polio as a child. Both legs encased in ironmongery and a badly misshapen back.

As an aside, TB is making a comeback and linked with large Asian populations.
 
Correct about the armoured seat back for the pilot
Though later on the powers that be had some removed to general dismay for payload tradeoff
Still the same for most combat aircraft.
 
On a similar note,I got a pension statement in the door from my now frozen DB pension. It tells me that I had 16.997 years of reckonable service. It appears that I'm about an hour and a half short of 17 years so that little unknown error will cost me Eu6000 when I do get to retire. Charming.
I think I read on another thread that standard practice in the police force was to do an couple of weeks extra beyond the “whatever years to qualify for a full pension” date to cater for cock ups in records, leave due etc?

When our lot shut the DB scheme to future accrual the pension trustees suggested rounding up to the nearest year to simplify matters. Oddly enough the company wanted to round everyone down. This was a typical act of short term stupidity as it was illegal, potentially people were going to lose up to 364 days of pensionable service. The result was untold complexity as they refused to round up, at a cost way in excess of the predicted cost of rounding up.
 
Hasn't this photo been proved to be a fake?
No idea but at RMAS in 1985 I well remember a College Commander visiting us on the COIN Ops exercise (Ex Dragon’s Teeth?) on Sennybridge banging on about gathering intelligence. Searching pockets for rice that could narrow down the area of their supply chain (enough water on Sennybridge to grow rice I suppose) and cutting off heads to aid ID.

The “dead”, played by the Gurkha Demonstration Company at RMAS were loving it. We weren’t so convinced as a) the guy was a nutter and b) it would have made cleaning up kit for the next inspection a right bastard. I guess nowadays he’d get done for racial profiling based on diet.
 

Oops

War Hero
ISTR that one of the terrible features of smallpox was that scarring was by no means a certainty? Aside from simply surviving, itself no certainty, the survivors were then left with the dreadful uncertainty of whether or not they’d look like a welder’s bench.

I‘d imagine this was much more a practical rather than cosmetic issue then ratger than today too. With no welfare state, getting married and / or a job were the only means of supporting yourself and at a guess chances of both were unlikely to be enhanced by terrible disfigurement.

Polio was a similarly unpredictable disease. Many experienced not much more than flu like symptoms but others died and yet others faced arguably a worse fate, years confined to truly primitive treatment in iron lungs.

I’m not sure about smallpox but polio was effectively eradicated in my lifetime. I can remember the sugar lump with the vaccine on it as a kid and in later life, a tutor at Woolwich who was appallingly crippled by polio as a child. Both legs encased in ironmongery and a badly misshapen back.

As an aside, TB is making a comeback and linked with large Asian populations.
True dat.
Uncle, Liverpool Gp's son, was infected by polio virus as a child, caused a bit of a flap throughout the district at the time ,early '50's (his Grandfather was Medical officer of Health, mucho embarrasment) turns out he brought it back from boarding school.

I can still taste that bloody sugarlump!

A mate and neighbour turned his farm into a highly successful Petting Farm thirty five years ago, first of it's kind in the area, everything went swimmingly till early noughties ...
He was encouraged to expand to accommodate educational visits from inner city schoolkids.....

Two problems arose...
Town kids( fom all socio economic backgrounds) were going home with a dose of the squits cos Mum kills 99.9% of all germs dead.
The biggest problem however, is he has to 'socially distance' his livestock, and TB test every 6 months (we're 48 months) cos of the TB infections his cattle and llamas etc are picking up from those travelling from East Lancashire etc.
 
I’m new here, literally made an account just to comment on this thread. I have been lurking this entire site for a few months (since lockdown got unbearable) and I have viewed this particular thread from start to now in the last few days, I just wanted to say what a pleasure it has been. I haven’t served, not yet atleast, but I have really enjoyed viewing the photos and discussion here, so thank you very much!
Welcome
 
I’m not sure about smallpox but polio was effectively eradicated in my lifetime. I can remember the sugar lump with the vaccine on it as a kid and in later life, a tutor at Woolwich who was appallingly crippled by polio as a child. Both legs encased in ironmongery and a badly misshapen back.

As an aside, TB is making a comeback and linked with large Asian populations.
Smallpox has been eradicated globally, through a massive international effort. The first ever disease to be completely eliminated.

There was an "outbreak" in Birmingham a few years ago following a containment breach in a research lab. As a result of this the global research stocks of the virus were nuked from orbit, apart from two ultra-secure sites in the US and Russia. (Which I suppose translates into "an ultra-secure site in America and the next outbreak in a shoddy old lab in Russia.").
 
Smallpox has been eradicated globally, through a massive international effort. The first ever disease to be completely eliminated.

There was an "outbreak" in Birmingham a few years ago following a containment breach in a research lab. As a result of this the global research stocks of the virus were nuked from orbit, apart from two ultra-secure sites in the US and Russia. (Which I suppose translates into "an ultra-secure site in America and the next outbreak in a shoddy old lab in Russia.").

Memory jog: I have a memory of a story told to me by a septic grunt while in BAOR, It seems the septic military cooked up something called "Poly water" when mixed with a small amount of fresh water, this mixture self replicates, and the water turns into a jelly like mess, making it undrinkable, the problem is that once activated it spreads uncontrollably, It was to be secretly dropped on Warsaw pact country's in the event of a hot war.

They reasoned that the whole worlds water would be made undrinkable within a few months, and they would have had no way to stop, or reverse the process, and so the only examples, amounting to a few ounces, is locked away in a super secure facility, somewhere in the USA.

It all sounds a bit science fiction.
 
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Memory jog: I have a faint memory of a story told to me by a septic grunt while in BAOR, It seems the septic military cooked up something called "Poly water" . . .

It all sounds a bit science fiction.
It's not so much science fiction as pathological science. It was hypothesized by a Russian about 50 years ago and shown to be a load of bollox.

Water is strange enough as it is without rubbish claims like polywater.
 
Rear gunners were paid on a daily rate as the attrition rate meant your pay stopped the day you got the good news to save money.
I worked with an ex-RAF chap we were both in a secret spy base.
He had been a rear gunner in the war, and a pleasant chap he was, but occasionally he had to go to a special place for a rest when those memories caught up with him.
 
I worked with an ex-RAF chap we were both in a secret spy base.
He had been a rear gunner in the war, and a pleasant chap he was, but occasionally he had to go to a special place for a rest when those memories caught up with him.

Menwith hill, the American listening and monitoring spy station near Harrogate?

Edit:- working up there a few years ago, driving past the base, my radio went bananas, and i was told not to stop while in the vicinity of the perimeter fence.
 

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