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Photos that make you think.

View attachment 497281

Twenty two years and about twenty odd minutes ago today, the IRA decided to demonstrate that they hadn’t quite plumbed the depths of filth that they wished to.

Peace to the twenty nine people who died and over two hundred injured physically, and the countless psychological injuries.

Hats off to Doc P, Mark J and all the others who went out of the gates that day into god knows what.

The first I remember of this was an appeal on the radio for off-duty NHS staff to turn in. While the sound dropping on "Dads Army" or somesuch on a Friday night and a voice saying that the RUC asked for keyholders in such and such an area to check their premises for incindiaries was part of my childhood, I can't remember one other occasion where the Medical establishment felt the were short handed to the extent that a broadcast was needed. It was immediately obvious that something "exceptional" had happened.
 

needlewaver

War Hero
Missed that by a day, almost to the minute. TF.
I was posted to the local Royal Irish battalion just under a year later; my RMO was decorated for his work that day as was the R Irish Med Corporal who was off duty in town shopping that day and can be seen in the infamous video taken looking up Market Street moments after the explosion.

The first anniversary very understandably prompted a steady flow of bods to the med centre, added pressure for them on top of living the UDR/R Irish lifestyle. One feels a bit of a dick when all you can do first thing is smile gently and get the kettle on.
 
Its a derelict Japanese Chi-Ha tank, so I guess the outrage was bit misplaced.

My error there, you're right it was a Japanese tank but the US marines had mounted the head on it. I read that even Roosevelt received the severed arm of a Japanese soldier to use as a letter opener, which he rejected.
 

Sticky847

Swinger
My error there, you're right it was a Japanese tank but the US marines had mounted the head on it. I read that even Roosevelt received the severed arm of a Japanese soldier to use as a letter opener, which he rejected.
I remember seeing a picture a few years ago of a skull a US marine had posted home to his sweetheart! Imagine showing yr grandchildren that souvenir.
Edit, found it tho sender was a swabbie
 

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I remember seeing a picture a few years ago of a skull a US marine had posted home to his sweetheart! Imagine showing yr grandchildren that souvenir.
OOoo Something for Kirtz to covet.
 
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Aliyah Khalaf Saleh, known as Umm Qusay. She featured heavily in the recent Once Upon a Time in Iraq documentary on BBC2. The true meaning of a humane, incredibly brave individual.
She was born near Tikrit to a Sunni family in 1956 in what was then the Kingdom of Iraq. Married young at 13, she never had the opportunity to attend school. She lost a husband, son and nephew to ISIS terrorism. In 2014, after the Camp Speicher massacre, she rescued over 50 Iraqi (Kurds, Shia Muslims, Yezidis and Christians) cadets behind the lines, and smuggled them to safety.She gave women’s clothes to some of the young men and hid them in the women's quarters on her farm. Others dug holes in a forest. IS fighters were hunting for the recruits, so Alyah obtained university identity cards for some of them, giving them local names. She taught those who were Shia how to say their prayers like a Sunni to protect them from sectarian suspicions. Over five months, she smuggled them to safety in Kurdish-held Kirkuk, hiding them in trucks surrounded by female relatives. After her cover was blown, her entire family of 25 fled the ISIS, returning only after the group’s defeat.
The highest Shi’a religious authorities bestowed on this Sunni woman the title of “Toa’a Al-‘Asr.” Toa’a today is used to describe women who place the wellbeing of others before themselves. In July 2015, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi presented her with Iraq’s Medal of the State. She won an International Women of Courage Award in 2018.In 2019, Iraqi Culture Minister Abdul Amir al-Hamdani has unveiled a bronze statue of her.

Whilst there are people like her in the Middle East, there is a tiny smidgeon of hope, in my humble opinion.
That's all well and good, but has she pulled a face in public and complained about the environment/climate/meat-eaters or redefined her sexual identity. If not, she will never be famous.
 
1961 ish,






'D' Watch military training day Xanten.
JHQ Comms 2 Sqn 28th Signal Regt.
after 'night shift', we could sleep, but unlike the RAF who then got a day off, we were given the joy of drill, manoeuvres and lots off shouting.
We didn't mind because we were stationed in JHQ, who needs a busload of nurses, we had it all on tap (thank you RAF).

This is a mix of regulars and N/S, we all got on surprisingly well until the wall got put up.

best of all, we were young....

27544921_1667088903334751_2112740392953049464_n.jpg



 
Hasn't this photo been proved to be a fake?
Only I believe in as much as the head-severing wasn't done by the Royal Marine in the picture.
It's more likely to have been done by the Iban trackers.
Before someone points out to me that Ibans are from Borneo and weren't in Malaya in 1952 when the picture was taken - they were. The use of Iban trackers for the Emergency is an interesting one which deserves an airing but in the meantime, I think it's worth given the story of a couple of individuals whose stories never got as much mileage as they perhaps ought:
<<
AWANG anak RAWANG. George Cross Iban Tracker, Johore, of Malaya.

During operations against the bandits in Malaya a section of a platoon of the Worcestershire Regiment was ambushed by about 50 of the enemy. The leading scout was killed instantly and the Commander fatally wounded.

Awang anak Rawang was hit through the thigh bone and at the same time a soldier, moving behind him, was hit below the knee, the bullet completely shattering the bone. Awang anak Rawang, although exposed and lying under heavy rifle and automatic fire, collected his own weapons and that of the soldier and dragged him into the cover of the jungle. Awang, completely disregarding his own wounds took up a position to defend the injured man. There he remained, firing on every attempt made by the bandits to approach, and successfully drove off several attacks. Ultimately Awang was again wounded. the bullet Shattering his right arm and rendering further use of his rifle or parang impossible. Despite loss of blood from his undressed wounds, he dragged himself over to the wounded soldier and took a grenade from the man’s pouch. He resumed his position on guard, pulled out the pin of the grenade with his teeth and with missile in his left hand defied the bandits to approach.

So resolute was his demeanour that the bandits, who had maintained their attacks for some forty minutes, and who were now threatened by the other sections, with- The coolness, fortitude and offensive spirit displayed by Awang anak Rawang were of the highest order. Despite being twice severely wounded severely he showed the utmost courage resolution to continue the fight and and protect the injured soldier.>>
London Gazette 16th November 1951 award of GC

And that of :

MENGGONG anak Panggit, George Medal Iban Tracker, Johore, Federation of Malaya.

Menggong anak Panggit was acting as second in command of an Iban platoon which was carrying out patrol duties in the Labis area of Segamat, Johore. The leading scout sighted an occupied bandit camp and during the attack which followed the Lieutenant in command of the platoon was killed. From the accurate and sustained light automatic and rifle fire which was directed at the platoon it was obvious that the bandits were disposed in great strength and depth. Menggong immediately assumed command of the platoon and despite the hail of bullets he seized a Bren Gun and under heavy fire into the enemy camp some 18 yards ahead. He called out to his men and, inspired by his example, the rest of the platoon, which hitherto had been pinned down, charged the Under his continuous encouragement and determined leadership his men, outnumbered by more than two to one, fought their way forward until the bandits were finally defeated and forced to withdraw, leaving the Ibans in sole possession of the camp and in command of the battlefield. Determined to come to grips with the enemy again as soon as possible Menggong organised a thorough search of the area and only when this proved fruitless did he order the withdrawal of his platoon.

London Gazette 3rd March 1953 Award of George Medal.
Although the citation doesn't mention it, Menggong was also commended for carrying out of the jungle the body of his dead officer, a Cameronian.
 
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offog

LE
View attachment 497281

Twenty two years and about twenty odd minutes ago today, the IRA decided to demonstrate that they hadn’t quite plumbed the depths of filth that they wished to.

Peace to the twenty nine people who died and over two hundred injured physically, and the countless psychological injuries.

Hats off to Doc P, Mark J and all the others who went out of the gates that day into god knows what.
My wife and children should have been there but their grandfather didn't bother coming back from the bar to collect them so they didn't go. Two miles there and back is a bit of a long walk for a 4 year old. They would have had to cross that junction to get home.
 
Only I believe in as much as the head-severing wasn't done by the Royal Marine in the picture.
It's more likely to have been done by the Iban trackers.
Before someone points out to me that Ibans are from Borneo and weren't in Malaya in 1952 when the picture was taken - they were. The use of Iban trackers for the Emergency is an interesting one which deserves an airing but in the meantime, I think it's worth given the story of a couple of individuals whose stories never got as much mileage as they perhaps ought:
<<
AWANG anak RAWANG. George Cross Iban Tracker, Johore, of Malaya.

During operations against the bandits in Malaya a section of a platoon of the Worcestershire Regiment was ambushed by about 50 of the enemy. The leading scout was killed instantly and the Commander fatally wounded.

Awang anak Rawang was hit through the thigh bone and at the same time a soldier, moving behind him, was hit below the knee, the bullet completely shattering the bone. Awang anak Rawang, although exposed and lying under heavy rifle and automatic fire, collected his own weapons and that of the soldier and dragged him into the cover of the jungle. Awang, completely disregarding his own wounds took up a position to defend the injured man. There he remained, firing on every attempt made by the bandits to approach, and successfully drove off several attacks. Ultimately Awang was again wounded. the bullet Shattering his right arm and rendering further use of his rifle or parang impossible. Despite loss of blood from his undressed wounds, he dragged himself over to the wounded soldier and took a grenade from the man’s pouch. He resumed his position on guard, pulled out the pin of the grenade with his teeth and with missile in his left hand defied the bandits to approach.

So resolute was his demeanour that the bandits, who had maintained their attacks for some forty minutes, and who were now threatened by the other sections, with- The coolness, fortitude and offensive spirit displayed by Awang anak Rawang were of the highest order. Despite being twice severely wounded severely he showed the utmost courage resolution to continue the fight and and protect the injured soldier.>>
London Gazette 16th November 1951 award of GC

And that of :

MENGGONG anak Panggit, George Medal Iban Tracker, Johore, Federation of Malaya.

Menggong anak Panggit was acting as second in command of an Iban platoon which was carrying out patrol duties in the Labis area of Segamat, Johore. The leading scout sighted an occupied bandit camp and during the attack which followed the Lieutenant in command of the platoon was killed. From the accurate and sustained light automatic and rifle fire which was directed at the platoon it was obvious that the bandits were disposed in great strength and depth. Menggong immediately assumed command of the platoon and despite the hail of bullets he seized a Bren Gun and under heavy fire into the enemy camp some 18 yards ahead. He called out to his men and, inspired by his example, the rest of the platoon, which hitherto had been pinned down, charged the Under his continuous encouragement and determined leadership his men, outnumbered by more than two to one, fought their way forward until the bandits were finally defeated and forced to withdraw, leaving the Ibans in sole possession of the camp and in command of the battlefield. Determined to come to grips with the enemy again as soon as possible Menggong organised a thorough search of the area and only when this proved fruitless did he order the withdrawal of his platoon.

London Gazette 3rd March 1953 Award of George Medal.
Although the citation doesn't mention it, Menggong was also commended for carrying out of the jungle the body of his dead officer, a Cameronian.
Posted this in 2018..

The Rhodesian African Rifles deployed to Malaya in 1956. They were issued with the....

Brand new ‘user trial’ FN 7.62mm self loading rifle.

Lieutenant General Sir Roger Bower said he need ‘desperately’ a ‘ captured enemy person’ and that whoever caught one would be immediately decorated.

8 June 56 a section of RAR were patrolling in a rubber plantation.

Rules of engagement were weapon had to be loaded but not made ready.

On seeing a group of 5 terrs, Cpl Tabuya , using the tump, trump sound of a generator on the plantation, On the next ‘tump’ made ready and shot one terr the rest took the gap.

Pvt Pisayi ran after the other 4 and ran down and captured two . The other two got away.

Pvt Pisayi was awarded the MM.
 
1598388710220.png




If an attack came, I would yell, “Corkscrew” on the intercom to the skipper and he would throw the Lanc into a steep dive. When a bomber corkscrews the worst place to be is in the back. As the wings go down the tail comes hurling up. Facing backwards, you go up too, and then you plunge back down as the skipper pulls back on the stick and the plane climbs steeply in the opposite direction. The G-force clamps on your head like a ton of concrete. Your chin is pressed hard into your chest and at the same time you are still trying to fire at the enemy fighter on your tail!’

I know it has been discussed on here many times, but these guys were just kids.!
History needs to be taught and learnt by the next generation.
 
History needs to be taught and learnt by the next generation.


It never has, and never will be. We still go on making the same mistakes, and as the decades roll on, the technology advances to the point that the history of warfare, killing and destruction is seen as antiquated, and obsolete in modern terms. Now we have un-manned drone war machines doing exactly what that young man done 80 years ago, without the slightest chance of a fatality. Remote killing & destruction, aren't we clever!
 
View attachment 499732



If an attack came, I would yell, “Corkscrew” on the intercom to the skipper and he would throw the Lanc into a steep dive. When a bomber corkscrews the worst place to be is in the back. As the wings go down the tail comes hurling up. Facing backwards, you go up too, and then you plunge back down as the skipper pulls back on the stick and the plane climbs steeply in the opposite direction. The G-force clamps on your head like a ton of concrete. Your chin is pressed hard into your chest and at the same time you are still trying to fire at the enemy fighter on your tail!’

I know it has been discussed on here many times, but these guys were just kids.!
History needs to be taught and learnt by the next generation.
Rear gunners were paid on a daily rate as the attrition rate meant your pay stopped the day you got the good news to save money.
 

Yokel

LE
Rear gunners were paid on a daily rate as the attrition rate meant your pay stopped the day you got the good news to save money.

How did that differ from the rest of the crew and other service personnel? My late uncle was a Flight Engineer on Lancasters and mentioned have to help remove the remains of rear gunners from their turrets, but he never mentioned the pay thing.

Am I right in thinking that armour was removed from the Lanc to maximise range and bomb load?
 

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