Photos that make you think.

4(T)

LE
Spotted this in Barclays Bank Salisbury this morning. The sheer scale of the ‘War effort’ is fascinating to me.
View attachment 451157


Bending the thread a bit to insert a related video that "makes me think".




This is an archive documentary about the making of the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine - not least the tremendous national effort that was required for volume production.


I find it very interesting on several levels:

1. The pipe smoking draughtsmen, the tool shop chappies and the blueprint girls. RR produced over 50 variants of the Merlin, each one which had to be conceived, designed, calculated, prototyped, drawn up and then production engineered;

2. The selection and stockpiling of materials, particularly high grade steels and alloys. Somehow they kept on top of materials QC, and the Ministry of Supply ran a fine balance of allocating these materials to all the demanding arms productions lines;

3. The induction and training of thousands of ordinary men and women to become skilled engineering workers, plus of course their housing, rationing, transport and welfare;

4. The reality of mass war production, particularly in the way that modern obersevers often can't grasp the context. I.e. historians might go "this engine/gun was better than that engine/gun; why didn't they switch to the latter?". Well, this film demonstrates that, iof you want 100k aero engines, you have to choose early and then get on with it!;

and:

5. My grandfather is somewhere in the film, one of the young RR engineers tasked with training new workers and overseeing the QC of sub-contractors and satellite plants. He had to spend weeks away on the job, whilst his wife and three young children were under constant bombing attacks back home near RR Derby.
 
I thought I had seen, at long last, the Sugar Puff monster.......but it`s simply a lady wearing a hat with sunglasses on.

1582217904445.png
 
Yes,
If you were to google Speakman and Black Watch, there are many references to Bill Speakman VC as Black Watch or BW attached KOSB
But I believe that although he was originally BW, he transferred to KOSB upon volunteering for Korea.
He was badged KOSB... he always emphasized that.
XXV!
 
Most regiments bound for Korea were seriously under battle establishment.
Seems odd in the days of universal conscription but at the beginning of the conflict the NS duration was only 18 months and added to that the time taken for trooping there and back and the fact that 19 was the minimum age for Korea. Despite raising National Service to 2 Years shortly afterwards, the battalions had to be augmented.
This was done by calling up the reserves or asking for volunteers or simply posting men in (as in your example) The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers were not untypical, their ranks were swelled by men from West Yorks Regt, East Yorks and others.
The Argylls and KOSB were stationed in Hong Kong when the Korean War broke out., when the Argylls were warned off for Korea they were seriously under strength .... 1KOSB were asked for volunteers... every man in the Bn volunteered, one company ended up transferring. Drafts from all Scottish regiments were sent to reinforce 1 KOSB prior to their relieving the Argylls in Korea six months later.
 
A Battalion at the end of the fray.(or, The 25th's Farewell to Korea)

View attachment 446799

Sergeant John Dorward and Sergeant Bill Smith of the 1st Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers have a beer on the deck of the troopship EMPIRE HALLADALE at the dockside in Pusan, as the battalion prepares to leave Korea.
I do like the look of incredulity captured on Sgt Dorwood's face in this (probably) un-posed shot.

View attachment 446801


Sergeant McMeeken of the 1st Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers on board the troopship, EMPIRE HALLADALE,...

View attachment 446805
Piper Major Donald McKinnon and pipers of the 1st Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers at the Commemoration Parade, Pusan Cemetery.

31 Borderers had been killed, 90 were wounded and 20 had been taken Prisoners of War.
Provost Sergeant Sammy McMeekin locked me up once - for marching with the Pipes and Drums.... I was a Pad's Brat in Ballykinler, where 1KOSB were stationed on their return from FARELF beginning of 1953....
shared a cell with the Adjutant's son...

Pipe Major Donald McKinnon was a fighter pilot in WW2... always remember him wearing RAF wings.

I believe Sgt John Dorward was Mentioned in Despatches for outstanding service on operations.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Although we complain about poor quality engineering products from China, they do have the ability to manufacturer to a high standard
take a close look at this image dated 1898
the Arsenal at Hanyang Wuhan China
although the lathes and other machinery are belt fed, this is not so different from a British Engineering works

16501224386_15c8253c81_k.jpg


link here to origional image and others from this period
 
To keep me off the streets and brain ticking over in retirement, last year I spent 3 months training as a guide at our local museum dedicated to production of traditional music boxes from the late 18C onwards .
We have a reconstruction of part of one workshop, complete with genuine belt-fed machinery dating from the mid-19C.
Last summer, a Chinese family visited. The elderly father entered the workshop, sniffed the air, grinned broadly and said something to his daughter.
She translated:
‘My father says he knows these machines, he knows how the belt-fed work stations operate. He works with them back home in China, now.’
 
Bending the thread a bit to insert a related video that "makes me think".




This is an archive documentary about the making of the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine - not least the tremendous national effort that was required for volume production.


I find it very interesting on several levels:

1. The pipe smoking draughtsmen, the tool shop chappies and the blueprint girls. RR produced over 50 variants of the Merlin, each one which had to be conceived, designed, calculated, prototyped, drawn up and then production engineered;

2. The selection and stockpiling of materials, particularly high grade steels and alloys. Somehow they kept on top of materials QC, and the Ministry of Supply ran a fine balance of allocating these materials to all the demanding arms productions lines;

3. The induction and training of thousands of ordinary men and women to become skilled engineering workers, plus of course their housing, rationing, transport and welfare;

4. The reality of mass war production, particularly in the way that modern obersevers often can't grasp the context. I.e. historians might go "this engine/gun was better than that engine/gun; why didn't they switch to the latter?". Well, this film demonstrates that, iof you want 100k aero engines, you have to choose early and then get on with it!;

and:

5. My grandfather is somewhere in the film, one of the young RR engineers tasked with training new workers and overseeing the QC of sub-contractors and satellite plants. He had to spend weeks away on the job, whilst his wife and three young children were under constant bombing attacks back home near RR Derby.
Watched that last night, though it was interesting from another POV, But that's another issue. I thought it was excellent.
 
Although we complain about poor quality engineering products from China, they do have the ability to manufacturer to a high standard
take a close look at this image dated 1898
the Arsenal at Hanyang Wuhan China
although the lathes and other machinery are belt fed, this is not so different from a British Engineering works

View attachment 451427

link here to origional image and others from this period
Wouldn't many of ours have been belt fed at this time too though?
 
Strawberry Fields today. some strange imagery going on.
2020-02-21 004 (1).jpg
 
From here LINK



Why a castle?

Wellington was virtually on the sea shore and therefor needed to be fairly robust
The surface buildings were designed by an architect who more commonly built country houses (forget his name) and the odd bridge if I remember rightly.
As far as I know the resemblence to a castle was largely because it was practical and aesthetically pleasant.

Wellington was at a prominent location near the entrance to Whitehaven Harbour which at the time was quite an elegant planned town.
Whitehaven wasn't always the run down shithole it became in the late 80's/90's

AS an asides, Wellington was the scene of a fairly large mining disaster

The reports of mining disaster can make enthralling but grim reading.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Wouldn't many of ours have been belt fed at this time too though?
yes all of our engineering machinery was belt driven, in fact my fathers first job as a 14 year old apprentice was after filling and lighting the stoves, to grease and check the drive belts, he worked at Curtis Engineering in Battersea
we had a local engineering company still using over head belt driven lathes in the 90s

heres a link all about it
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
Anyone remember the spiky comb attaching plates to connect the canvas strap ends together? The tines were wickedly sharp. Also, cardboard tubes of duckshit called 'Beltstik' which was used on the contact face of the belts to stop slipping. Our local smithy had a one pot donk to run several machines. It's probably where I got the engineering bug. No cure.
 
Part of the reason why Korean forces were alleged to engage in atrocities stem from orders by Park Chung-Hee to minimise casualties through practices such as hostage-taking and the brutality of South Korean forces was both due to many officers being Japanese-trained with many officers themselves following the same doctrines during the Korean War
Brutal as the Japanese were, I doubt that they could teach the Koreans much in the way of brutality as many ex-FEPOWs testified.
North Koreans were as capable as the South in carrying out atrocities in the Korean War, Photo below shows;

""Thirty-four atrocity victims from the 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, [US Army] killed
near Taegu on 15 August 1950. The men were all shot with their hands bound behind their
backs.""

There were many atrocities carried out upon UN troops in the Korean War, the question is why are they so little known about? Were they deliberately played down by the various government or was it general lack of interest at home?
koreanAtrocity3.jpg
 
Brutal as the Japanese were, I doubt that they could teach the Koreans much in the way of brutality as many ex-FEPOWs testified.
Large number of NK troops had fought the Japanese in China*. Not to mention that the vast majority of them by that point would have grown up under Japanese colonial rule and have their expectations if proper conduct for an army shaped by that.

*Part of the short-lived post dear settlement between Chiang and Mao was that the Red Army demob its Koreans and send them home, do they'd doubtless have turned up under DPRK colours.
 
zzxxzzxxs-l640.jpg


23 year old German soldier Manfred Pernass, is about to die at the hands of US forces at Henri-Chapelle on 23-12-1944. He, Oberfähnrich Günther Billing and Gefreiter Wilhelm Schmidt were captured wearing US uniforms for Operation Greif ("Griffin"). They were all executed. Their Waffen-SS commander, Otto Skorzeny, would, after the war, also be charged but acquitted. Their (non-combat) use of enemy uniforms ended up being considered a legitimate use by the tribunal.

A case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time....and wearing the wrong clothes!
More info and photos here:

 

MrMemory

War Hero
On this day in 1944, Anzio area. Gunners from 78 Field Regiment, well protected from rain, making a brew (via Twitter)

Screen Shot 2020-02-27 at 09.40.13.png
 
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