Photos that make you think.

Most sources have this particular photo as a Swedish ship during a training exercise.

There is a photo of the HNLMS Abraham Crijnssen, but its in a tropical setting and covered with typical jungle live cam foliage.
Ah, never trust the captions on the internet - as Churchill said to Lady Rotherhyde
 

Yokel

LE
On a seasonal note, are there any pictures out there of Santa Claus before the Coca Cola company decided to make him wear red? He was an canonised Turkish Bishop wore wore a Green robe, and dropped coins down chimneys so that poor families did not need to send their daughters out to work as prostitutes.

Any old Green Santa pictures out there?
 

BopBopBop

Old-Salt
On a seasonal note, are there any pictures out there of Santa Claus before the Coca Cola company decided to make him wear red? He was an canonised Turkish Bishop wore wore a Green robe, and dropped coins down chimneys so that poor families did not need to send their daughters out to work as prostitutes.

Any old Green Santa pictures out there?
c8dca906174c5ee1bd45b3fdbdfa9d5e--christmas-stuff-christmas-humor.jpg
 
A wounded German soldier lights the cigarette of a wounded Brit. 1918.

zzxxSMoking_20140630-WWILENS-slide-FJRH-jumbo.png


Most of us are familiar with the Christmas truce of 1914, but the article below talks of sustained "truces" and sections of the front line where temporary cease fires were instigated all throughout the great war.
Not something I am familiar with.


What kept these tacit truces alive? Inertial truces arose where there was general reluctance to fight, usually out of a combination of self-interest and empathy. If fired upon, parties would return fire, but both sides preferred to “let sleeping dogs lie.” High command did not look favorably on this inactivity, so in the latter half of the war, they exerted more direct control over the trenches, e.g., by ordering specific raids. Soldiers adapted by ritualizing their aggression and conforming with the letter, but not the spirit, of the commands. They deliberately aimed their rounds high, patrols pretended not to see each other or followed routes such that they would not encounter each other, they fired into no-man’s land instead of into the trenches, and they shelled the same place or at the same time every day so that the other side could avoid that area or schedule to suit. Such ritualized aggression still looked like a battle from the outside, and reports could be sent to high command about the times and duration of the battles and how much ammunition was spent. The complexity of this uncoordinated cooperation between warring parties—usually without direct communication between the two sides, with individuals constantly rotating in and out, and sanctions imposed both within each side and between enemies—is impressive, to say the least.
 
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In the midst of all that hatred and death
Humour prevails
The Average soldier whatever side he is on, just want to get on with it and get back home
humour is a great leveller


This Gentleman has the most amazing archive of Great War Images, if you have a little time look through them
Der letzte Eimer Marmalade, just summed it up.
 
On a seasonal note, are there any pictures out there of Santa Claus before the Coca Cola company decided to make him wear red? He was an canonised Turkish Bishop wore wore a Green robe, and dropped coins down chimneys so that poor families did not need to send their daughters out to work as prostitutes.

Any old Green Santa pictures out there?
Also the origin of the pawnbrokers sign.

Santa Claus, Patron Saint of Prostitute's, Pawnbrokers... and Sailors and brewers amongst other groups. There's something smacks of down the docks about him if you ask me.
 
A wounded German soldier lights the cigarette of a wounded Brit. (1918)

View attachment 434329

Most of us are familiar with the Christmas truce of 1914, but the article below talks of sustained "truces" and sections of the front line where temporary cease fires were instigated all throughout the great war.
Not something I am familiar with.


What kept these tacit truces alive? Inertial truces arose where there was general reluctance to fight, usually out of a combination of self-interest and empathy. If fired upon, parties would return fire, but both sides preferred to “let sleeping dogs lie.” High command did not look favorably on this inactivity, so in the latter half of the war, they exerted more direct control over the trenches, e.g., by ordering specific raids. Soldiers adapted by ritualizing their aggression and conforming with the letter, but not the spirit, of the commands. They deliberately aimed their rounds high, patrols pretended not to see each other or followed routes such that they would not encounter each other, they fired into no-man’s land instead of into the trenches, and they shelled the same place or at the same time every day so that the other side could avoid that area or schedule to suit. Such ritualized aggression still looked like a battle from the outside, and reports could be sent to high command about the times and duration of the battles and how much ammunition was spent. The complexity of this uncoordinated cooperation between warring parties—usually without direct communication between the two sides, with individuals constantly rotating in and out, and sanctions imposed both within each side and between enemies—is impressive, to say the least.
An adoptive uncle of ours on mums side was in the German Engineers in the first lot. He was a rather studious kind of person to look at but it seems he was involved in counter sapping for listening posts. Of course they would hear when either the Russians or us had brass visiting. Of the Russians he would smile and say, course if the brass came there, it would be greeted like the end of the wR coz they’d be blind drunk for three days.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Thanks. Actually it was a genuine question about what Christmas was like when it was still seen as a spiritual and family occasion before aggressive commercialisation and social pressures to pretend everything is wonderful took over.

Did Santa feature in the Victorian Christmas?
Yes the Santa Claus has been around for several centuries now but the colour seems to vary as to which country is involved. In fact it is possible to see all sorts of colours if you use the following site.

Images of Santa Claus in Victorian Times
 
Sancho Claus looks pretty amusing with his bottle of cactus squeezing.
Sancho Claus 3.jpg
 
dead cormorant.jpg


I took this photo myself this morning on a local beach. It's a dead cormorant which appears to have had a bite taken out of it. (for scale the bite is about 8 - 10 inches across)
Now bearing in mind this is the Moray Firth. I'm thinking what is big enough to cause that size bite?
Presumably it's a predetory fish of some kind.
 
Bottle nosed dolphin or a teeny tiny orca.
Thinking about it, it probably is a dolphin. I suppose if they were both going for the same fish at the same time. I know the Dolphins can be very agressive.
I see a lot of "bodies" washed up on the shore, but this is the first I have seen with such a big bite out of it.
I suppose it could be caused by a propeller.
 

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