Photos that make you think.

If you’ll forgive me for this not being a photo, but I think you’ll appreciate the sentiment

They only want to trade with us
 
If you’ll forgive me for this not being a photo, but I think you’ll appreciate the sentiment

A week last Thursday I got a taxi to go out to a shooting club event. Turned out that the driver was from Kosovo. I explained to him that I had been there twice in 1999 and 2000 as part of the British army. He starting thanking me and telling me how grateful he and his countrymen were for us and the US forces coming to their rescue. That lasted for the whole journey. I was quite surprised to be honest.

He still made me pay the fare though!
 
A week last Thursday I got a taxi to go out to a shooting club event. Turned out that the driver was from Kosovo. I explained to him that I had been there twice in 1999 and 2000 as part of the British army. He starting thanking me and telling me how grateful he and his countrymen were for us and the US forces coming to their rescue. That lasted for the whole journey. I was quite surprised to be honest.

He still made me pay the fare though!
Lots of Kosovan's are actually Albanian. He told you what you wanted to hear. Did you tip him?
 
The US Marine photographer who took this photo below some weeks after the bombing of Nagasaki' later stated;

"I saw a boy about ten years old walking by. He was carrying a baby on his back. In those days in Japan, we often saw children playing with their little brothers or sisters on their backs, but this boy was clearly different. I could see that he had come to this place for a serious reason. He was wearing no shoes. His face was hard. The little head was tipped back as if the baby were fast asleep. The boy stood there for five or ten minutes".
"The men in white masks walked over to him and quietly began to take off the rope that was holding the baby. That is when I saw that the baby was already dead. The men held the body by the hands and feet and placed it on the fire. The boy stood there straight without moving, watching the flames. He was biting his lower lip so hard that it shone with blood. The flame burned low like the sun going down. The boy turned around and walked silently away".

View attachment 431040
I find that really difficult to comprehend, if you see what I mean. I mean those with a chip on their shoulders should compare and contrast.
 
1574596147834.png


These table legs are in Pompei, exactly where they were left in 79AD. The inscription on the top of each leg identifies the table as having once belonged to Casca Longus. He was the first assassin to strike Caesar in the Senate in 44BC. He died in 42BC along with Brutus at the Battle of Philippi in Macedonia.
 
Schoolteacher Victim of the Cultural Revolution
CulturalRevolution.png

Were these the same students who took part in her murder?

More here;
Quote
One of the earliest victims of the Cultural Revolution was Bian Zhongyun, a 50-year-old vice principal at the prestigious Beijing Normal University Girls High School. In June 1966, some of the school’s students began to criticize school officials and organize revolutionary meetings.

Bian’s college degree and bourgeois background made her a natural target for the revolutionaries, although many of them were ironically from privileged families themselves. Over the next two months, Bian was repeatedly harassed by her students and even beaten during a meeting.

On August 4 of that summer, Bian was tortured and warned not to come to school the next day. But she decided to come in that morning anyway. It was a courageous decision that would cost Bian her life.

First, her teenage students beat and kicked her. Then they whacked her with nailed-filled table legs. The attack was so terrible that Bian soiled herself and was knocked unconscious before dying of her wounds. Nobody was ever punished for her murder, and even today, the perpetrators have yet to step forward.

In January 2014, Song Binbin, a famous Red Guard and one of Bian’s students at the time she was killed, made a public apology for her death. Although Song claimed that she had no direct part in Bian’s beating, she felt guilty for not being able to stop it.

Some critics, however, felt the apology was insincere and that Song had a larger role than she was willing to admit. Bian’s husband, Wang Jingyao, was also not impressed with the apology. In one interview, he said that Song was a "bad person," although he believed that the Communist Party and Mao Tse-tung were also responsible.
Unquote
Link; Stories from the Cultural Revolution
 

4(T)

LE
Schoolteacher Victim of the Cultural Revolution
View attachment 433964
Were these the same students who took part in her murder?

More here;
Quote
One of the earliest victims of the Cultural Revolution was Bian Zhongyun, a 50-year-old vice principal at the prestigious Beijing Normal University Girls High School. In June 1966, some of the school’s students began to criticize school officials and organize revolutionary meetings.

Bian’s college degree and bourgeois background made her a natural target for the revolutionaries, although many of them were ironically from privileged families themselves. Over the next two months, Bian was repeatedly harassed by her students and even beaten during a meeting.

On August 4 of that summer, Bian was tortured and warned not to come to school the next day. But she decided to come in that morning anyway. It was a courageous decision that would cost Bian her life.

First, her teenage students beat and kicked her. Then they whacked her with nailed-filled table legs. The attack was so terrible that Bian soiled herself and was knocked unconscious before dying of her wounds. Nobody was ever punished for her murder, and even today, the perpetrators have yet to step forward.

In January 2014, Song Binbin, a famous Red Guard and one of Bian’s students at the time she was killed, made a public apology for her death. Although Song claimed that she had no direct part in Bian’s beating, she felt guilty for not being able to stop it.

Some critics, however, felt the apology was insincere and that Song had a larger role than she was willing to admit. Bian’s husband, Wang Jingyao, was also not impressed with the apology. In one interview, he said that Song was a "bad person," although he believed that the Communist Party and Mao Tse-tung were also responsible.
Unquote
Link; Stories from the Cultural Revolution


Those who ignore history, etc...
 

dwills

War Hero
Schoolteacher Victim of the Cultural Revolution
View attachment 433964
Were these the same students who took part in her murder?

More here;
Quote
One of the earliest victims of the Cultural Revolution was Bian Zhongyun, a 50-year-old vice principal at the prestigious Beijing Normal University Girls High School. In June 1966, some of the school’s students began to criticize school officials and organize revolutionary meetings.

Bian’s college degree and bourgeois background made her a natural target for the revolutionaries, although many of them were ironically from privileged families themselves. Over the next two months, Bian was repeatedly harassed by her students and even beaten during a meeting.

On August 4 of that summer, Bian was tortured and warned not to come to school the next day. But she decided to come in that morning anyway. It was a courageous decision that would cost Bian her life.

First, her teenage students beat and kicked her. Then they whacked her with nailed-filled table legs. The attack was so terrible that Bian soiled herself and was knocked unconscious before dying of her wounds. Nobody was ever punished for her murder, and even today, the perpetrators have yet to step forward.

In January 2014, Song Binbin, a famous Red Guard and one of Bian’s students at the time she was killed, made a public apology for her death. Although Song claimed that she had no direct part in Bian’s beating, she felt guilty for not being able to stop it.

Some critics, however, felt the apology was insincere and that Song had a larger role than she was willing to admit. Bian’s husband, Wang Jingyao, was also not impressed with the apology. In one interview, he said that Song was a "bad person," although he believed that the Communist Party and Mao Tse-tung were also responsible.
Unquote
Link; Stories from the Cultural Revolution
Students, the perfect people to brainwash, under the guise of enlightenment and learning....
 
Schoolteacher Victim of the Cultural Revolution
View attachment 433964
Were these the same students who took part in her murder?

More here;
Quote
One of the earliest victims of the Cultural Revolution was Bian Zhongyun, a 50-year-old vice principal at the prestigious Beijing Normal University Girls High School. In June 1966, some of the school’s students began to criticize school officials and organize revolutionary meetings.

Bian’s college degree and bourgeois background made her a natural target for the revolutionaries, although many of them were ironically from privileged families themselves. Over the next two months, Bian was repeatedly harassed by her students and even beaten during a meeting.

On August 4 of that summer, Bian was tortured and warned not to come to school the next day. But she decided to come in that morning anyway. It was a courageous decision that would cost Bian her life.

First, her teenage students beat and kicked her. Then they whacked her with nailed-filled table legs. The attack was so terrible that Bian soiled herself and was knocked unconscious before dying of her wounds. Nobody was ever punished for her murder, and even today, the perpetrators have yet to step forward.

In January 2014, Song Binbin, a famous Red Guard and one of Bian’s students at the time she was killed, made a public apology for her death. Although Song claimed that she had no direct part in Bian’s beating, she felt guilty for not being able to stop it.

Some critics, however, felt the apology was insincere and that Song had a larger role than she was willing to admit. Bian’s husband, Wang Jingyao, was also not impressed with the apology. In one interview, he said that Song was a "bad person," although he believed that the Communist Party and Mao Tse-tung were also responsible.
Unquote
Link; Stories from the Cultural Revolution
There was a very thought-provoking documentary made by ex-squaddie Hu Jie on this subject.
If anyone wonders why the CCP is less than enthusiastic about youth-led protest movements, this is a good primer.
 
Those who ignore history, etc...
Part of the problem in 1989 was that those in government observing the youth protests were all survivors of the Red Guards' best efforts and were determined not to ignore history.

The students themselves were mostly ignorant of exactly what had gone on and had no inkling of how their actions were being interpreted, particularly once they started networking with working-class youth groups.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Those who ignore history, etc...
One only has to look at the way some young people idolise Corbyn. They don’t seem remotely concerned by the past or even able to grasp what they future under his rule will be like.
 

offog

LE

I would like to think that he did not know much about the cultural revolution or is he just closing his eyes to it.

For those who have not seen the report British Steel has been brought by the Chinese.

Along the same lines I heard an interview by one of the children taking part in the ER demo. She was convinced that life would end winin the next 50 unless we did something now. She was obviously parenting others words and unable to understand the meaning of them or have the ability to question them.
 
I would like to think that he did not know much about the cultural revolution or is he just closing his eyes to it.
From the context in that report, he was using the worst excesses of Mao's reign to criticise the UK government for selling off assets to the CCP.
 

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