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Photos that make you think.

The wife’s family had a Ukrainian refugee marry in, he was the right age to have been involved in this. Right up until he died I was half expecting him to be arrested and accused of War Crimes, he never gave any reason to think so, apart from after the break up the Soviet Union he made no attempt to travel home to his home village in Western Ukraine. He once said that those who he knew had traveled back told him that his home village was gone, no sign that it had ever existed and replaced by fields. But I always suspected that he didn’t simply get swept up in the mass movement of people fleeing the fighting but had ran all the way from the Ukraine to Glasgow for a reason.
did he select Glasgow because the ethnic tension reminded him of home or do you reckon he just kept running until he hit the Atlantic?
 
Bachem Ba 349 Natter photographed right after the take-off. The only manned vertical take-off flight took place on 1 March 1945 and ended in the death of the test pilot - Lothar Sieber.

the allies are about to kick down their front and back doors in, i wonder how many of the scientists, engineers and other staff wondered WTF they were doing or if they were just happy to be out of the way
 
Oh right 100% sure they Also used British troops?
Captured Commandos were held in concentration camps as opposed to POW camps; Sachsenhausen being one.

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I've long been aware of the duplicity in the foreign SS 'conscripts' (willing volunteers more like) but the actualities of this incident had passed me by. Cheers for posting it.
 
Been there a few time I belive they got captured British airmen/army to test Germany army military boots there walking around a rocky path all day with back packs filled with rocks?
Jews and others singled out for 'special treatment' - generally speaking the Germans played by the GC rules when it came to western POWs, probably because we had hod-loads of theirs
 
Been there a few time I believe they got captured British airmen/army to test Germany army military boots there walking around a rocky path all day with back packs filled with rocks?
Other ranks can be a obliged to work under the GC as long as it isn't in direct support of the enemy war effort. Farming has always been deemed legitimate work, even if you were under U-boat blockade. The boot testing seems marginal to me but today they'd call it Health and Safety so it would have to be OK.
 
Captured Commandos were held in concentration camps as opposed to POW camps; Sachsenhausen being one.

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The undermentioned was taken from Wikipedia, so its content cannot be substantiated.

The Commando Order (German: Kommandobefehl) was issued by the OKW, the High Command of the German armed forces, on 18 October 1942 stating that all Allied commandos encountered in Europe and Africa should be killed immediately without trial, even if in proper uniforms or if they attempted to surrender. Any commando or small group of commandos or a similar unit, agents, and saboteursnot in proper uniforms, who fell into the hands of the German forces by some means other than direct combat (through the police in occupied territories, for instance), were to be handed over immediately to the Sicherheitsdienst (SD, Security Service). The order, which was issued in secret, made it clear that failure to carry out these orders by any commander or officer would be considered to be an act of negligence punishable under German military law. This was in fact the second "Commando Order", the first being issued by Generalfeldmarschall Gerd von Rundstedt on 21 July 1942, stipulating that parachutists should be handed over to the Gestapo. Shortly after World War II, at the Nuremberg Trials, the Commando Order was found to be a direct breach of the laws of war, and German officers who carried out illegal executions under the Commando Order were found guilty of war crimes.

The Commando Order was issued by Hitler as a direct result of the Commando Raid on Dieppe when a captured Commando manual allegedly listed methods of killing German prisoners.

No. 62 Commando, formed in 1941, consisted of a small group of 55 commando-trained personnel working under the Special Operations Executive (SOE), where it was also known as the Small Scale Raiding Force (SSRF). Under the operational control of Combined Operations Headquarters, No. 62 Commando was commanded by Major Gustavus Henry March-Phillipps. Its first operation, Operation Postmaster, was in January 1942, when March-Phillipps led the seizure of an Italian liner, a German tanker and a yacht from Fernando Po.[The SSRF used HM MTB 344, a motor torpedo boat nicknamed The Little Pisser because of its outstanding turn of speed. The SSRF carried out a number of cross-channel operations, but had mixed fortunes. Operation Barricade and Operation Dryadwere complete successes, but Operation Aquatint, on 12/13 September 1942 at Sainte-Honorine on the coast of Normandy, resulted in the loss of all the men involved, including March-Phillipps.[One member of the raiding party, Captain Graham Hayes MC, managed to reach France and eventually made his way to Spain, but was betrayed by a French double agent and handed to the Germans. After nine months' solitary confinement in Fresnes Prison he was shot on 13 July 1943.

With the loss of March-Phillipps, Major Geoffrey Appleyard was given command. On 3/4 October 1942 the SSRF carried out a raid on the Channel Island of Sark, codenamed Operation Basalt, with men from No. 12 Commando attached. After the raid a number of dead and wounded Germans were found tied up (they had been shot while trying to escape), which resulted in the prisoners captured in the Dieppe raid being tied up and the Commando Order ordering the execution of all captured commandos.

In early 1943 No. 62 Commando was disbanded and its members were dispersed among other formations. A number went to the Middle East and served in the Special Boat Squadron, most notably Major Anders Lassen, the only member of the United Kingdom Special Forces ever awarded the Victoria Cross.[9] Appleyard also went to the Middle East and helped to form the 2nd Special Air Service from a detachment of No. 62 Commando under the command of Bill Stirling, elder brother of David Stirling. Neither Lassen nor Appleyard survived the war.
 
Other ranks can be a obliged to work under the GC as long as it isn't in direct support of the enemy war effort. Farming has always been deemed legitimate work, even if you were under U-boat blockade. The boot testing seems marginal to me but today they'd call it Health and Safety so it would have to be OK.
The boot testing was done to the point of exhaustion/death for the poor unfortunates

Bloody Shoes
 
The wife’s family had a Ukrainian refugee marry in, he was the right age to have been involved in this. Right up until he died I was half expecting him to be arrested and accused of War Crimes, he never gave any reason to think so, apart from after the break up the Soviet Union he made no attempt to travel home to his home village in Western Ukraine. He once said that those who he knew had traveled back told him that his home village was gone, no sign that it had ever existed and replaced by fields. But I always suspected that he didn’t simply get swept up in the mass movement of people fleeing the fighting but had ran all the way from the Ukraine to Glasgow for a reason.
Went on a trip to Kaliningrad (ex East Prussia). All Germans except me and the missus. At one point we went with a german man to try and find the village where his familly came from. We had a 1935 map to work with. Didn't find a brick.
 
Major Anders Lassen, a man who truly found his metier in WW II.

Well worth spending a few moments of time in looking at his biography.
 
........sort of was, a win-win for the 3rd Reich, having looked into it a bit more it seems the pink triangle brigade were also used to excess in this. Strange thing is according to reports the victims were forced to march in new boots hopped-up on pervitin or whatever else the experiment of the day requited to test both their endurance and that of the footwear - part of the justification was to test the durability of the boots, part to check how far fully equipped infantry could march - but as they were under-nourished to start with, not issued with socks/foot wraps or given boots that actually fitted and/or were broken-in the data was worthless.......
 
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The boot testing was done to the point of exhaustion/death for the poor unfortunates

Bloody Shoes
One of the Britons involved in the boot testing was a Royal Navy officer. I recall the account of how, while about to be executed, he managed to snatch an escort's rifle and kill him with it before he himself was shot.
I believe he was awarded a minor gallantry award posthumously but it's story that deserves to be better known.

Edited to add.
Bit of digging on the internet shows that it wasn't a rifle but a pistol and the posthumous award was MID.
The camp was Sachsenhausen and the prisoner was Lt John Godwin RNVR
Link;
Lt John Godwin
 
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A master cobbler from Sensburg in East Prussia, Dr Ernst Brennscheidt, a career civil servant who never joined the SS or the NSDAP but who was known for his cruelty
Brennscheidt was sentenced to 15 years of forced labour in the USSR. He was pardoned after seven years, most likely due to the efforts of West German chancellor Adenauer, and opened a shoe shop near Dusseldorf.
 
The boot testing was done to the point of exhaustion/death for the poor unfortunates

Bloody Shoes

I suppose, with a large stretch of the imagination one can get the ".. only following orders..." excuse for such behaviour. What I can't get my head round is why, on top of the incredible mistreatment, add the extra cruelty of making the poor sods wear the wrong size or badly fitting shoes. Just pure evil.
 
I remember hearing about the 168 Allied Airmen (mainly RAF and USAAF) held in Buchenwald on the History Channel, and the man who managed to secure their release before they were executed, with the help of the Luftwaffe:

Phillip John Lamason DFC & Bar (15 September 1918 – 19 May 2012) was a pilot in the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) during the Second World War, who rose to prominence as the senior officer in charge of 168 Allied airmen taken to Buchenwald concentration camp, Germany, in August 1944. Raised in Napier, he joined the RNZAF in September 1940, and by April 1942 was a pilot officer serving with the Royal Air Force in Europe. On 8 June 1944, Lamason was in command of a Lancaster heavy bomber that was shot down during a raid on railway marshalling yards near Paris. Bailing out, he was picked up by members of the French Resistance and hidden at various locations for seven weeks. While attempting to reach Spain along the Comet line, Lamason was double-crossed by a traitor within the Resistance and handed over to the Gestapo.

After interrogation, he was taken to Fresnes prison. Classified as a "Terrorflieger" (terror flier), he was not accorded prisoner-of-war (POW) status, but instead treated as a criminal and spy. By 15 August 1944, Lamason was senior officer of a group of 168 captured Allied airmen who were taken by train to Buchenwald concentration camp, arriving there five days later.

At Buchenwald, the airmen were fully shaved, starved, denied shoes, and for three weeks forced to sleep outside without shelter in one of the sub-camps known as "Little Camp". As senior officer, Lamason took control and instilled a level of military discipline and bearing.

For several weeks Lamason negotiated with the camp authorities to have the airmen transferred to a POW camp, but his requests were denied. At great risk, Lamason secretly got word to the Luftwaffe of the Allied airmen's captivity and, seven days before their scheduled execution, 156 of the 168 prisoners were transferred to Stalag Luft III. Most of the airmen credit their survival at Buchenwald to the leadership and determination of Lamason. After the war, he moved to Dannevirke and became a farmer until his retirement. During the 1980s and 1990s, he was a regular speaker at KLB Club and POW reunions.

Phil_Lamason.jpg
 

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