Photos that make you think.

This is a photo that makes me think.


Among the names of the Holocaust, Bullenhaser Damm doesn't readily ring a bell the scale of the atrocity there, small the number of victims compared to Belsen, Dachau and so on but great in the scale of horror.
The fact that the names of the child victims are known somehow adds to the tragedy.

Link
Bullenhuser Damm
That is just truly horrifying - just when you think the Nazis (or people in general) can't get any lower something like this comes to light.

What kind of man can do thiings like that to children FFS?
 
What kind of man can do things like that to children FFS?
Depends who you mean, I'd say. Arnold Strippel, who oversaw the hangings and was awarded a compensation of 120000 Deutschmark after his sentence was retroactively reduced from life to five years in 1970? Kurt Heissmeyer, who wanted a professorship so desperately he conducted tuberculosis experiments on children and at his trial said "I did not think that inmates of a camp had full value as human beings", having worked as a respected physician specialising in tuberculosis treatment right up to his arrest in 1963? His uncle August Heissmeyer, Prussian infantry officer during WW1, who facilitated his nephew's experiments, became the director of the West German Coca-Cola bottling plant and died at the age of 82?
 
We walked into one cell and there was a small Union Jack, now my memory on this isn't too clear but IIRC correctly the last occupant of that cell was a member of the Royal Air Force. It didn't say how he ended up there, no other details except his name which I don't recall and Royal Air Force.

Squadron Leader Bertram "Jimmy" James, RAF, one of the 76 who escaped from Stalag Luft III, Sagen in "The Great Escape. He was sent to Sachsenhausen after 13 escape attempts and escaped from there as well!

From his Obituary in the Independent

Known as Jimmy to his friends, the RAF squadron leader was one of only a handful of survivors able to make the anniversary journey back to Zagan in 2004, site of the Stalag Luft III prisoner of war camp immortalised in the film, The Great Escape.

Some 76 Allied airmen tunnelled out of the camp, thought impregnable by their Nazi captors. Only three made it to safety while 50 were recaptured and executed on the personal orders of Adolf Hitler. Sqn Ldr James was among the lucky ones.

His life was spared, apparently following pressure from Goering. Because of his irrepressible desire to escape – he completed 13 breakouts during his five-year capture – he was sent to the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen – a place which claimed the lives of half of the 200,000 inmates that passed through its doors.
Cheers Highlander, it definitely wasn't him then as the last Airman to occupy the cell with the small Union Jack was murdered in that cell. It may have been a crew member from a bombing raid towards the end of the war who was taken there because it was close by. I guess we'll never know for sure.
 
A few years back, turning right out of Aachen main station, I walked past a large building that was a local Sparkasse (Savings Bank)
There was a plaque set in the building which I wouldn't normally have taken any notice of but the fact that it had 1933-1945 in very large script piqued my interest.
As I recall, the memorial stated that the building had been the Aachen Medical Institute and it was there that the policy of sterilisation and euthanasia for the local area was organised.
It mentioned several hundred men women and children who were murdered during the NS period, simply because they were 'minderwertig' (inferior) - what I suppose we would call people with learning difficulties, these days.

It's hard to forget that there must have been many harrowing stories of German mothers entrusting their otherwise healthy kids to the hospital, only to be told that the child had died shortly after admission. Even had they known or suspected it was euthanasia, they could have done nothing.

Edited to add;
Looking for the site on google maps, Germany was a waste of time. The only photos of the site on the internet that I came up with were the two below;

The memorial plaque is centre; right of the ATM

The plaque mentions seven hospitals in the area involved-what that means nationwide is hard to contemplate.

These pics were on a site called Traces of War, I haven't had a chance to get a proper look at it but it may be of use to anyone interested in the wider subjects that it covers;
Traces of War
 
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On the sitting on a chair theme I was always somewhat invigorated by this image ...

2018 CK.jpg


.... gone now of course but a stunner in her time .
 
This is a photo that makes me think.


Among the names of the Holocaust, Bullenhaser Damm doesn't readily ring a bell the scale of the atrocity there, small the number of victims compared to Belsen, Dachau and so on but great in the scale of horror.
The fact that the names of the child victims are known somehow adds to the tragedy.

Link
Bullenhuser Damm
From the linked site, I think this bears repeating, all the more at this time, alas.

Adolf Hitler's SS Men

Hitler surrounded himself with a small clique of fanatical, ruthless henchmen - a violent group of outsiders who rose to power in the Third Reich and established political and economic institutions of legitimized terror.

These masterminds of death were found to be quite psychologically normal. They were men of fine standing, husbands who morning and night kissed their wives, fathers who tucked their children into bed.

But murders, brutalities, cruelties, tortures, atrocities, and other inhuman acts were an everyday occurrence.

The European Jews were the primary victims of the Nazis. In 1933 nine million Jews lived in the 21 countries of Europe that would be occupied by Germany during the war. By 1945 two out of every three European Jews had been killed.

But Jews were not the only group singled out for persecution by Hitler's Nazi regime. One-half million Gypsies, 250,000 mentally or physically disabled persons, and more than three million Soviet prisoners-of-war also fell victim to Nazi genocide. Jehovah’s Witnesses, homosexuals, Social Democrats, Communists, partisans, trade unionists, and Polish intelligentsia were also victims of the hate and aggression carried out by the Nazis.
 
From the linked site, I think this bears repeating, all the more at this time, alas.

Adolf Hitler's SS Men

Hitler surrounded himself with a small clique of fanatical, ruthless henchmen - a violent group of outsiders who rose to power in the Third Reich and established political and economic institutions of legitimized terror.

These masterminds of death were found to be quite psychologically normal. They were men of fine standing, husbands who morning and night kissed their wives, fathers who tucked their children into bed.

But murders, brutalities, cruelties, tortures, atrocities, and other inhuman acts were an everyday occurrence.

The European Jews were the primary victims of the Nazis. In 1933 nine million Jews lived in the 21 countries of Europe that would be occupied by Germany during the war. By 1945 two out of every three European Jews had been killed.

But Jews were not the only group singled out for persecution by Hitler's Nazi regime. One-half million Gypsies, 250,000 mentally or physically disabled persons, and more than three million Soviet prisoners-of-war also fell victim to Nazi genocide. Jehovah’s Witnesses, homosexuals, Social Democrats, Communists, partisans, trade unionists, and Polish intelligentsia were also victims of the hate and aggression carried out by the Nazis.
And the pikies, don't forget the pikies.
 
Depends who you mean, I'd say. Arnold Strippel, who oversaw the hangings and was awarded a compensation of 120000 Deutschmark after his sentence was retroactively reduced from life to five years in 1970? Kurt Heissmeyer, who wanted a professorship so desperately he conducted tuberculosis experiments on children and at his trial said "I did not think that inmates of a camp had full value as human beings", having worked as a respected physician specialising in tuberculosis treatment right up to his arrest in 1963? His uncle August Heissmeyer, Prussian infantry officer during WW1, who facilitated his nephew's experiments, became the director of the West German Coca-Cola bottling plant and died at the age of 82?
There really is no justice...
 
Cheers Highlander, it definitely wasn't him then as the last Airman to occupy the cell with the small Union Jack was murdered in that cell. It may have been a crew member from a bombing raid towards the end of the war who was taken there because it was close by. I guess we'll never know for sure.
The prisoner could have been a member of SOE, the Special Operations Executive. A number of SOE agents were held temporarily in Sachsenhausen and a few were executed (see account below) Many SOE agents, and particularly female agents, were classified as Nacht und Nebel (NN) prisoners, meaning they could disappear (and be executed) without trace and no record. One of the most famous RAF agents was held in Buchenwald along with a couple of officers from my Corps. They were strangled with piano wire hung from meat hooks in the cellar of one building, but Wing Commander Forest Frederick Edward Yeo-Thomas @ The White Rabbit, escaped from Buchenwald with the aid of other prisoners, by taking the place of a dead (and diseased) prisoner, and escaping before as he was being taken to a town crematorium.


Around the end of March 1945, Francis Suttill and another SOE agent named William Grover disappeared from the Sachsenhausen camp where they had been imprisoned in the Zellenbau (camp prison). Paul Schroeder, a prisoner in the camp, told Allied investigators, regarding Suttill and Grover: "They were transported by ambulance car to the Industriehof where they were most certainly executed by either hanging, shooting or lethal chamber." The Industriehof was a section of the camp, located outside the prison enclosure, where there were factories as well as a gas chamber and an execution place where condedemned prisoners were shot.

The British Public Records Office files say that Suttill was hanged on March 21, 1945, but his date of death is also given in the same files as March 23, 1945. The camp records at Sachsenhausen were confiscated by the Soviet Union and if the record of the execution of Suttill was ever found, it was not released by the Soviets. During the trial of the Sachsenhausen staff, by the Soviet Union in 1947, testimony was given about Suttill's execution, but the SOE was no longer in existence by that time and Suttill's family never received confirmation of his death; they always believed that he was still alive.

Addendum: Suttill was commissioned into the East Sussex Regiiment, his Father was English and his Mother was French. Recruited by SOE he went on to head the PROSPER Circuit. At the time of his death, he was listed as a Major. He was married with two sons.

William Grover (or William Grover-Williams) was a Racing Driver during the 1920s and 1930s. Married to a Frenchwoman, and living in France. At the outbreak of hostilities, he was commissioned into the Royal Army Service Corps (RASC). Also recruited by SOE because of his language skills.
 
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Stumpy4154

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"Tallest on the right, shortest on the left! Size!!"
IMG_1655.JPG



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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ancienturion

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Stumpy4154

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There has got to be a bit of perspective shift or similar here otherwise if the big lad is 6' 2" the little bloke is only 3' 5"
Not sure about a perspective shift, as behind the little bloke is another "normal" sized bloke.
 

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