Photos that make you think.

In York Minster last week....
2018-09-03 035 (1).jpg
 
Every German of this point in time knows what went on in the camps and education on those years is freely available.
SWMBO and I along with our kids were in Berlin a couple of months after the Berlin Wall was opened up, we were visiting an old mate who was attached to the RWF in Berlin.

The women and kids took off on a shopping expedition so me and the mate decided to go for a drive in the East, we arrived in one town and as we were driving down the street I happen to notice a large set of gates set back in a street, well not so much a street but there were a fair few houses close by.

Mate turned the car around and there above the gates was the familiar sight seen on the gates of most of the camps, Arbeit Macht Frei, we had stumbled upon Sachsenhausen concentration camp.

The Russians/East Germans had pretty much left it as they had found it and jeez it was just fecking horrifying. I can still see in my minds with very good clarity the things we saw but it's not something I would share on here, you would have to see it for yourself in order to believe me.

One thing that did particularly strike me was when we were walking though the punishment block, this was a row of cells with maybe around 10 cells in the block. In each cell there was a small flag indicating the nationality of the person found in the cell when the camp was liberated (some cells had no flag).

We walked into one cell and there was a small Union Jack, now my memory on this isn't too clear but IIRC correctly the last occupant of that cell was a member of the Royal Air Force. It didn't say how he ended up there, no other details except his name which I don't recall and Royal Air Force.

I just had a look on the Sachsenhausen website and I see now tours of the camp cost 16 Euros, we paid a couple of East German marks to get in and we were the only two people in the place. The camp now is a far cry from when we visited, it looks more visitor friend for want of better words.

I really can't say (don't know) if the majority of Germans during that time were aware of the camps or what went on there. I can say for certain though that the people of Oranienburg/Sachsenhausen certainly knew what was going on because the camp was more or less smack bang in the middle of the fecking area.

I just had a look on Google Street view and it looks like it's changed a lot since we visited, looks like a lot of the huts are no longer there.

Sachsenhausen.gif
 
I don't get it. :? What am I supposed to e thinking about when I see this picture of an Asian gentleman sitting on a chair?
It might be a Zen koan thing...

A koan is a riddle or puzzle that Zen Buddhists use during meditation to help them unravel greater truths about the world and about themselves. Zen masters have been testing their students with these stories, questions, or phrases for centuries. ... It is up to the Zen student to tease out their meaning.



...or it could just be a pic of a bloke sitting on a chair....
 
Re: the Asian in York Minster.
Japan has long had a sizable Christian population. St Mary's Cathedral in Nagasaki, built at the end of the 19th Century and re-built after the war is well worth a visit. They had a fair few martyrs for their faith.

A few years back the Times of Japan ran an article on what it was like for one particular Christian in the war-time army.
It's unlikely to change anyone's opinion but might be worth a read;
Link:
Times of Japan
 
It might be a Zen koan thing...

A koan is a riddle or puzzle that Zen Buddhists use during meditation to help them unravel greater truths about the world and about themselves. Zen masters have been testing their students with these stories, questions, or phrases for centuries. ... It is up to the Zen student to tease out their meaning.



...or it could just be a pic of a bloke sitting on a chair....
Up in the Himalayas some of the older folk doing that sort of meditation, breath only once each two or three minutes. However they would sit nowhere other than on Gods earthen or stone floor. Incidentally Buddhism is the fastest growing religion in Europe.
 
This is a photo that makes me think.


Among the names of the Holocaust, Bullenhaser Damm doesn't readily ring a bell the scale of the atrocity there, small the number of victims compared to Belsen, Dachau and so on but great in the scale of horror.
The fact that the names of the child victims are known somehow adds to the tragedy.

Link
Bullenhuser Damm
 
Went there 30 odd years ago on a bright, warm summers day.
As soon as we passed through the entrance it seemed like you had entered a different world, atmosphere was colder, birds that were tweeting outside were now silent, and invisible eyes were watching your every move.
Definitely gave you a feeling of how fragile your own mortality is.
Was there in the summer and birds do tweet there but regardles unbelievable place
 

Joker62

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Up in the Himalayas some of the older folk doing that sort of meditation, breath only once each two or three minutes. However they would sit nowhere other than on Gods earthen or stone floor. Incidentally Buddhism is the fastest growing religion in Europe.
Don't tell the Muslims that!
 
Among the names of the Holocaust, Bullenhaser Damm doesn't readily ring a bell the scale of the atrocity there, small the number of victims compared to Belsen, Dachau and so on but great in the scale of horror.
The fact that the names of the child victims are known somehow adds to the tragedy.
A social worker in the Hamburg area told me not too long ago about how some kids in one of the schools she worked in started insulting others as "dirty Jews" and how she and some colleagues took the offenders to this memorial for an outing. Apparently they were remarkably quiet afterwards.
 
Further to my ramblings above it indeed looks as if Sachsenhausen has been made a little more visitor friendly. If you click on the link below it will take you to Google Streetview and a picture of a part of the camp.

52.767081,13.262475 @ Instant Street View

Now I remember that part of the camp quite vividly because when we visited, there was an over head type one track U shaped pulley system which had hooks on the pulleys. From our understanding, people were put on those hooks while still alive and then pushed down to the hut at the end where they were shot. They were then pushed by the prisoners back up to the beginning of the system were they were removed for disposal.

I also remember reading that in it's early days Sachsenhausen was used as a training camp for the SS Officers and guards who were being posted to other camps and that a lot of their training aides were live human beings.
 
SWMBO and I along with our kids were in Berlin a couple of months after the Berlin Wall was opened up, we were visiting an old mate who was attached to the RWF in Berlin.

The women and kids took off on a shopping expedition so me and the mate decided to go for a drive in the East, we arrived in one town and as we were driving down the street I happen to notice a large set of gates set back in a street, well not so much a street but there were a fair few houses close by.

Mate turned the car around and there above the gates was the familiar sight seen on the gates of most of the camps, Arbeit Macht Frei, we had stumbled upon Sachsenhausen concentration camp.

The Russians/East Germans had pretty much left it as they had found it and jeez it was just fecking horrifying. I can still see in my minds with very good clarity the things we saw but it's not something I would share on here, you would have to see it for yourself in order to believe me.

One thing that did particularly strike me was when we were walking though the punishment block, this was a row of cells with maybe around 10 cells in the block. In each cell there was a small flag indicating the nationality of the person found in the cell when the camp was liberated (some cells had no flag).

We walked into one cell and there was a small Union Jack, now my memory on this isn't too clear but IIRC correctly the last occupant of that cell was a member of the Royal Air Force. It didn't say how he ended up there, no other details except his name which I don't recall and Royal Air Force.

I just had a look on the Sachsenhausen website and I see now tours of the camp cost 16 Euros, we paid a couple of East German marks to get in and we were the only two people in the place. The camp now is a far cry from when we visited, it looks more visitor friend for want of better words.

I really can't say (don't know) if the majority of Germans during that time were aware of the camps or what went on there. I can say for certain though that the people of Oranienburg/Sachsenhausen certainly knew what was going on because the camp was more or less smack bang in the middle of the fecking area.

I just had a look on Google Street view and it looks like it's changed a lot since we visited, looks like a lot of the huts are no longer there.

View attachment 351685
We walked into one cell and there was a small Union Jack, now my memory on this isn't too clear but IIRC correctly the last occupant of that cell was a member of the Royal Air Force. It didn't say how he ended up there, no other details except his name which I don't recall and Royal Air Force.

Squadron Leader Bertram "Jimmy" James, RAF, one of the 76 who escaped from Stalag Luft III, Sagen in "The Great Escape. He was sent to Sachsenhausen after 13 escape attempts and escaped from there as well!

From his Obituary in the Independent

Known as Jimmy to his friends, the RAF squadron leader was one of only a handful of survivors able to make the anniversary journey back to Zagan in 2004, site of the Stalag Luft III prisoner of war camp immortalised in the film, The Great Escape.

Some 76 Allied airmen tunnelled out of the camp, thought impregnable by their Nazi captors. Only three made it to safety while 50 were recaptured and executed on the personal orders of Adolf Hitler. Sqn Ldr James was among the lucky ones.

His life was spared, apparently following pressure from Goering. Because of his irrepressible desire to escape – he completed 13 breakouts during his five-year capture – he was sent to the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen – a place which claimed the lives of half of the 200,000 inmates that passed through its doors.
 
I don't get it. :? What am I supposed to e thinking about when I see this picture of an Asian gentleman sitting on a chair?
Well I thought it was good to see someone at peace with himself.....maybe not.
 

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