Photos that make you think.

I cannot give it a "like" as there is nothing remotely likable about what amounts to medieval warfare. My grandfather survived the first war, half of it in the trenches, HOW?
Because the times he would have got within hand-to-hand combat range were statistically insignificant. Much more likely to have been taken out by artillery fire. Glad he survived.

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When I was about 12 [circa 1977] I went climbing with my brother in Wales - my first experience and I caught the bug big time. I was half way up a climb when of all things a bloody Vulcan flew down the valley, seemingly below my level. It was followed by two more.
Whilst at 14 Sigs, we did AT in the middle hills in Wales (don't what they are called and don't really care). There were all sorts of aircraft looping down the valleys, flying betwen the hills. Mad, I tell you, all of them. You could literally see the faces, or rather the helmets and visors, of the aircrew.
 
When I was about 12 [circa 1977] I went climbing with my brother in Wales - my first experience and I caught the bug big time. I was half way up a climb when of all things a bloody Vulcan flew down the valley, seemingly below my level. It was followed by two more.
I had a similar experience when I was on The Eildon Hills in The Borders late 1970's ... I was out with my son and three flew past ... not just past but below us .... an unforgettable sight .... we were looking at the pilot of the nearest one as they silently drifted past .... and then a roar .... of course on that day no camera in my pack .
 
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Because the times he would have got within hand-to-hand combat range were statistically insignificant. Much more likely to have been taken out by artillery fire. Glad he survived.

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He lived to 70, he was 21 and 8 months old on discharge, he was 13 when he signed up, boy drummer and bugler. 1st Batt RRF. In Palestine on Gen Allenby's staff, cypher and signal Sgt, he witnessed the surrender of the Turks to British forces on Dec 9th 1917 in Jerusalem.. I signed up at age 21 and 8 months old. He survived service in Malta, France, Belgium, Luxemburg and Gallipoli, attached to the Australian mounted division. His war history is extraordinary, and runs into several pages. In WW2 again in uniform, this time as an ambulance driver, and witnessed the strafing and bombing of factory workers in Lea Bridge Road, east london, coming out from the many munitions factory's and gas works. His service Number was 1752. I am immensely proud of my grand father, his daughter is still alive, my mother. End.
 
Makes me wonder if the sight of this riot squad would have cleared the rabble from the streets of N.Ireland. No snatch squads for us, "Front rank one round volley at the man in the red shirt, go on"
579226_riot squad.jpg
 

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Makes me wonder if the sight of this riot squad would have cleared the rabble from the streets of N.Ireland. No snatch squads for us, "Front rank one round volley at the man in the red shirt, go on" View attachment 345572
In the "early" days of Op Banner we did form up something like that, but no bayonets and no ammo! There are some pics on Pinterest showing platoons formed up - it did not last long, certainly not even to the end of our first tour.
 
In the "early" days of Op Banner we did form up something like that, but no bayonets and no ammo! There are some pics on Pinterest showing platoons formed up - it did not last long, certainly not even to the end of our first tour.
Ah, but the good ladies of Divis were still giving out tea and biccies to the lads in those early days.
 
Fair play to him (and the rest of you). I don’t like the idea of being in contact with nothing other than a couple of mags and some eye catching headgear.


I know, snowflake generation!
We had all of the very latest allie kit on Banner, Just back from a stroll in the Lenadoon, the following day we were involved in a major riot situation on the Suffolk road, 6 of us with head injuries two aspirin and back out you go!
clive 1.jpg
 
'Unknown warrior: Westminster Abbey' www.westminster-abbey.org and 'Army Chaplain who took Unknown Warriors secret to the grave' (The Guardian) have quite good background.
I'm trying to recall an article which suggested the exhumation locations would ensure the likelihood it would produce a soldier of the BEF, Kitchener's Army or one of the other evolutions the British Army went through whilst excluding other nationalities.
"The Unknown Soldier" by Neil Hanson is an excellent book which goes into probably as much detail as will ever be available regarding how the Unknown Soldier was selected.
It also details other countries unknown soldiers (the chapter about Arlington is particularly interesting) & gives the story of how The Cenotaph came to be.
The book is still available & well worth a read.
 
My first flack jacket in Northern Ireland (1977) was one of these - M69 US Army 12960's issue:




I don't know about running round in SE Asian temperatures, but I found it very comfy to wear in Belfast...
Did it actually provide us any protection from anything with any velocity?
 
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