Photos that make you think.

Now you know why we consider it 'sacred ground' and a sacred date?
I'm at a local commemoration this weekend.
Was supposed to be on Sunday, but the pesky World Cup final etc got in the way.

EDIT:

William Faulds - Wikipedia

Awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 18 July 1916 at Delville Wood,

His Victoria Cross was displayed at the National Museum of Military History in Johannesburg. This Victoria Cross was stolen off a display in 1994 and is still missing.
I visited there this year, very sobering, and those woods are tingling with emotion
 
A while back the Jeremy Vine show on R2 had a programme devoted to Zeppelins and the RFC pilots who shot them down. They described how Londoners had been terrorised by the Zeppelin raids so when a way was finally found to shoot them down, crowds gathered to watch singing the national anthem and cheering as the airships fell burning.

Then an old dear called in to say nobody cheered, nobody sang the national anthem. Londoners watched horrified as German airmen fell screaming to their deaths, landing all around and bursting like over-ripe fruit when they hit the ground. Men and women cried at the sight and the screams haunted her the rest of her life.

Put a dampener on Vine's jingoistic version of events.
That patch of ground with the impact mark of the body was roped off, tended, flowers planted and weeded by a local woman for some years after, which pretty much tallies up with what you say.
 
Random question - I joined-up in the 1980s so have no idea what NS was like, though bits of 'Get Some In' (less the dreaded Cpl Marsh) rang true to my experience, how much of that and/or 'Bad lad's Army' was it like?
I joined in 1965 and the training syllabus hadn't changed from N/service the training staff had carte blanche to scream and shout as much as they wanted, but as someone said earlier you realise it's a well rehearsed act and most of the snco were ok at the end of the day, so regarding your question about "bad boys army" it was very close, especially the Guardroom antics. but it was still very hard going and unlike today,you didn't/couldn't complain.
 
The diary of Tanya Savicheva

Zhenya died on December 28th at 12 noon, 1941
Grandma died on the 25th of January at 3 o'clock, 1942
Leka died March 17th, 1942, at 5 o'clock in the morning, 1942
Uncle Vasya died on April 13th at 2 o'clock in the morning, 1942
Uncle Lesha May 10th, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, 1942
Mama on May 13th at 7:30 in the morning, 1942​
The Savichevs are dead​
Everyone is dead​
Only Tanya is left​
The main street of the St. Petersburg (ex-Leningrad) - Nevskiy prospect
 
Manfred_von_Richthofen_and_his_dog.jpg


The caption says, Manfred von Richthofen “The Red Baron” petting his dog on an airfield, 1916. His dog was apparently called "Moritz"

I am thinking it would have been better if his dog was called "Schwartzer"
 
The chap who made the impression was Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Mathy, 33 year-old Commander of the L31. Some contemporary reports suggested that he lived for a short while after landing.

View attachment 343184
Many years back the BBC had a series on the Great War.
I recall they interviewed a pilot who had shot down a zeppelin, and he said one of the crew, knowing he was about to go to a fiery death, did a run and jump off, sans parachute.
 
The chap who made the impression was Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Mathy, 33 year-old Commander of the L31. Some contemporary reports suggested that he lived for a short while after landing.

View attachment 343184
Slight thread drift - the same happened to casualties from the Pan Am jumbo which crashed onto Lockerbie in 1988.

Pan Am flight 103 | Overview, Crash, Victims, & Facts

Indeed, I remember reading somewhere that some corpses were found halfway up fences, with crawl trails behind them.
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
I doubt a saw back bayonet caused much consternation to a British Tommy who had a sharpened shovel and improvised trench club to hand.
After seeing some of the "trench raiding weapons" at the IWM in London, I've got to agree. They are nothing more than weapons design to kill or maim in the most brutal of circumstance.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
After seeing some of the "trench raiding weapons" at the IWM in London, I've got to agree. They are nothing more than weapons design to kill or maim in the most brutal of circumstance.
War is Hell!

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 
The chap who made the impression was Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Mathy, 33 year-old Commander of the L31. Some contemporary reports suggested that he lived for a short while after landing.

View attachment 343184

Sorry to be the naysayer but I think you might have the wrong officer. If the caption on the Daily Mail photograph was correct and it was a Zeppelin shot down over Billericay then that was the L32, commanded by Kapitan-Leutnant Werner Petersen. L32 was shot down by Lt Frederick Sowrey and came to earth in Great Burstead. Mathy and L31 were shot down over Potters Bar a couple of weeks later by the excellently named Wulstan J Tempest.

In terms of the L32, there is a small museum in Billericay (the Cater Museum) which has some amazing relics of the Zeppelin including heat warped hatch doors, crew cushions and (I believe) remnants of the last meal the crew were eating when they were shot down. The former curator wrote a short but well researched and interesting pamphlet titled The Fate of the Zeppelin L32.
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
Slight thread drift
You are talking about weapons for night patrolling, hit and run raids to cause consternation and capture prisoners. I believe we are talking about your average Tommy and your average Fritz fighting backward and forward with issued weapons.....also the average soldier was quite ignorant in the sense that there was very little information about what was happening. If your mates told you something was bad, you generally believed them and I can truly say having handled one, the saw back bayonet really comes over as bad. I was amazed at the weight and the sharpness of the cross cut saw teeth.

I suppose another analogy is the sniper - if you were caught with a rifle with a telescopic sight you would not be taken prisoner while the guys around you with ordinary rifles would. There's war and there's killing - in a strange way there's a difference. It's always makes you think when you see victors sharing food, drink, cigarettes etc with recently captured enemy. All in the same boat and after "fair fight"

Anyway back to the piccies...
Much like the 1st Airborne chaps at Arnhem/Oosterbeek
 

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