Photos that make you think.

Slight thread drift
You are talking about weapons for night patrolling, hit and run raids to cause consternation and capture prisoners. I believe we are talking about your average Tommy and your average Fritz fighting backward and forward with issued weapons.....also the average soldier was quite ignorant in the sense that there was very little information about what was happening. If your mates told you something was bad, you generally believed them and I can truly say having handled one, the saw back bayonet really comes over as bad. I was amazed at the weight and the sharpness of the cross cut saw teeth.

I suppose another analogy is the sniper - if you were caught with a rifle with a telescopic sight you would not be taken prisoner while the guys around you with ordinary rifles would. There's war and there's killing - in a strange way there's a difference. It's always makes you think when you see victors sharing food, drink, cigarettes etc with recently captured enemy. All in the same boat and after "fair fight"

Anyway back to the piccies...
 


29 Apr 13, National Airlines cargo Boeing 747 experiences load-shift (due to internal load not being properly secured, hence affecting centre of gravity). The rest, as they say, is history.

The really sad thing about this is that the poor f***ers flying the thing must've known the end was coming from about 15 seconds out.

1531841688303.png
 
I was amazed at the weight and the sharpness of the cross cut saw teeth.
Absolutely. could do some serious damage in a 'forehand/backhand' action.
Instant amputations if you got it right with the first swipe.
My nipper spent a few of his Christmas Monies on a 'zombie knife'.
Confiscated immediately, and I showed him a few pics of knife wounds.
Also explained the law to him.
 
Absolutely. could do some serious damage in a 'forehand/backhand' action.
Instant amputations if you got it right with the first swipe.
My nipper spent a few of his Christmas Monies on a 'zombie knife'.
Confiscated immediately, and I showed him a few pics of knife wounds.
Also explained the law to him.
What happened to the good old days when a 12 year old boy scout could have a sheath knife strapped to his belt and didn't think it was for fighting off the scout master?
 
What happened to the good old days when a 12 year old boy scout could have a sheath knife strapped to his belt and didn't think it was for fighting off the scout master?
They were taught about consent.
 
The tale from Somme Mud when they found the body of the Brit Sgt with something like 7 german soldiers laying around him dead and a broken entrenching tool still gripped in his hands at Delville Wood really brings home the desperation and horror of trench warfare IMO.
That reminds me of the joke about the school kids who are asked to tell a story that has a moral to it.

Little Johnny tells of when his grandad was in the war, separated from his mates one night in no mans land, with just his rifle, bayonet, 2 rounds and half a bottle of whisky.

Grandad spotted 5 Germans creeping up on him, so he drank the whisky, shot dead two Germans and bayoneted the other three, before making his escape to safety.

When asked what the moral of the story was, he replied;

"Don't fcuk with my grandad when he's had a drink, Miss".
 
Blissfully unaware as I was aged 13, I got out of Dad's black Beetle after it cannoned into the Singer which is embedded into the road island not realising he was pissed as a fart ( and on his way to topping self 5 years later)
I only discovered a few years back looking through a large container of family records he had been fines the princely sum of £10/17s/6d for DD. I guess he got points too, or perhaps a ban but I cannot recall.

Tough wee buggers these Beetles and fortunately so was my skull!
Makes me think....;)
It survived to putt putt another day.


"Oh please Dad(me) don't make me join up. I'll eat dinner...honest!


Glasgow Art Gallery.
Is that the Bealach on the way to Appelcross ?
 
Is that the Bealach on the way to Appelcross ?
I really do not know mate but I doubt it. I don't think Mum & Dad went that far without me.
I've a feeling it's more likely to part of the old Rest & be Thankful..perhaps the A83 or close off it.
Could be wrong. It would be either 1968/69 there.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Makes me think of the irony.

We spent hundreds of years formalising warfare, essentially making it less barbaric in many ways.

We then have the first industrialised war (machine guns, heavy artillery, tanks, aircraft, radio/phone comms, submarines etc - and yes I know some of them were used earlier) and revert to weapons we hadn’t used since the Middle Ages.
 
Yep, Remarque (sp?)
I must go through the book and see if that conversation was in it.

EDIT:
Aha!
AQOTWF.


Ammunition and hand-grenades become more plentiful. We overhaul the bayonets-that is to say, the ones that have a saw on the blunt edge. If the fellows over there catch a man with one of those he's killed at sight. In the next sector some of our men were found whose noses were cut off and their eyes poked out with their own saw-bayonets. Their mouths and noses were stuffed with sawdust so that they suffocated.

Some of the recruits have bayonets of this sort; we take them away and give them the ordinary kind.

But the bayonet has practically lost its importance. It is usually the fashion now to charge with bombs and spades only. The sharpened spade is a more handy and many-sided weapon; not only can it be used for jabbing a man under the chin, but it is much better for striking with because of its greater weight; and if one hits between the neck and shoulder it easily cleaves as far down as the chest. The bayonet frequently jams on the thrust and then a man has to kick hard on the other fellow's belly to pull it out again; and in the interval he may easily get one himself. And what's more the blade often gets broken off.
Another reason to be glad I wasn't born 70 or so years earlier.

Mildly amused that he refers to the poor bastard he snaps his bayonet on as a 'fellow'.

Language of the day, but almost makes the business hacking an enemy soldier to death polite :)
 
Last edited:

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Platt Deutsch.
 
Mildly amused that he refers to the poor bastard he snaps his bayonet on as a 'fellow'.
Language of the day, but almost makes the business hacking an enemy soldier to death polite :)
Beg leave to remark that the original German reads "dem andern kräftig gegen den Bauch treten", literally "kick the other's belly", very matter-of-fact with no connotations of politeness. In any case, the translator, Arthur Wheen, had trench experience as well, 1916 to 1918.
 
From the Daily Mail:- WW1 picture shows imprint of German officer who fell from Zeppelin | Daily Mail Online
The picture of the imprint of a German officer is quite disturbing.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
A while back the Jeremy Vine show on R2 had a programme devoted to Zeppelins and the RFC pilots who shot them down. They described how Londoners had been terrorised by the Zeppelin raids so when a way was finally found to shoot them down, crowds gathered to watch singing the national anthem and cheering as the airships fell burning.

Then an old dear called in to say nobody cheered, nobody sang the national anthem. Londoners watched horrified as German airmen fell screaming to their deaths, landing all around and bursting like over-ripe fruit when they hit the ground. Men and women cried at the sight and the screams haunted her the rest of her life.

Put a dampener on Vine's jingoistic version of events.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
msr ARRSE: Site Issues 1
PartTimePongo ARRSE: Site Issues 37
F Current Affairs, News and Analysis 2

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top