Photos that make you think.

Septics went for quantity over quality (armour). To have built armoured ships would have taken longer to build plus they would be more expensive and slower. All factors in the design process. The US wanted, and got, lots of carriers out on the Pacific very quickly. It was relatively easy to replace ships (and crew).
I believe the Ecsort Carriers were designated CVE,which the crews took for Carrier, Vulnerable, Expendable.
 
Two crew in a Phantom, what about the back-seater? Or are you just making it up...
RN F-4 lost in 1977 - only Phantom loss that year
892 NAS Burnt out on the runway at Leuchars, Fife after an aborted take off due to engine failure. Both crew ejected. Allocated to ground instruction at Leuchars and later to Predannack

Which is what happens when you let the fish-heads play with shiney things
 
image.jpeg


Second Lieutenant Henry Lumley RFC; crashed during a solo flight on the day of his Wings Parade in 1917. This is him prior to the surgery that ultimately led to his death. The surgeons attempted a graft of one large piece of skin from his chest onto his face; the functionality of his eyes and lips would not be restored but he would be 'easier to look at'.

Now speaking as an ex-medic, I hate burns. Amputations may be reattached, lacerations can be sutured and holes can be plugged, thermal decomposition changes that. Having read the story of the Guinea Pig Club, Richard Hillary et al., I cant envisage the trauma of burns surgery now, let alone in the Forties.

To then imagine suffering those injuries with the treatment available in 1917 beggars my belief. Minimal analgesia, minimal asepsis and minimal hope.

Sadly, Lumley died in 1918 of complications due to infection caused by trying to graft such a large piece in one go. I can't even try to think of what his life would have been like had he survived.
 
View attachment 342550

Second Lieutenant Henry Lumley RFC; crashed during a solo flight on the day of his Wings Parade in 1917. This is him prior to the surgery that ultimately led to his death. The surgeons attempted a graft of one large piece of skin from his chest onto his face; the functionality of his eyes and lips would not be restored but he would be 'easier to look at'.

Now speaking as an ex-medic, I hate burns. Amputations may be reattached, lacerations can be sutured and holes can be plugged, thermal decomposition changes that. Having read the story of the Guinea Pig Club, Richard Hillary et al., I cant envisage the trauma of burns surgery now, let alone in the Forties.

To then imagine suffering those injuries with the treatment available in 1917 beggars my belief. Minimal analgesia, minimal asepsis and minimal hope.

Sadly, Lumley died in 1918 of complications due to infection caused by trying to graft such a large piece in one go. I can't even try to think of what his life would have been like had he survived.
Poor b****d.
 
A photograph taken from another aircraft by a member of the regular crew of 'Extra Joker' who'd been asked to fly separately in order to get some shots of his plane and crewmates. He lived, they all died.
The survivor guilt must have been strong
 
Military air incidents are not investigated by Farnborough, they’re done in-house.
I thought all aircraft incidents involved and were reported by the AAIB
 
8460D6B7-6FCE-4F7C-97F0-9D98887862A7.jpeg

Text with photo reads:
“The sawtooth bayonet was considered to be too brutal in an already barbaric war. When plunged into the victim, it caused severe pain, also pulling out the victim's insides when removed. Therefore, any prisoners captured with this version of bayonet were immediately executed.”

1st world war soldier with said sawtooth. Not sure what the face mask is?
 
View attachment 342550

Second Lieutenant Henry Lumley RFC; crashed during a solo flight on the day of his Wings Parade in 1917. This is him prior to the surgery that ultimately led to his death. The surgeons attempted a graft of one large piece of skin from his chest onto his face; the functionality of his eyes and lips would not be restored but he would be 'easier to look at'.

Now speaking as an ex-medic, I hate burns. Amputations may be reattached, lacerations can be sutured and holes can be plugged, thermal decomposition changes that. Having read the story of the Guinea Pig Club, Richard Hillary et al., I cant envisage the trauma of burns surgery now, let alone in the Forties.

To then imagine suffering those injuries with the treatment available in 1917 beggars my belief. Minimal analgesia, minimal asepsis and minimal hope.

Sadly, Lumley died in 1918 of complications due to infection caused by trying to graft such a large piece in one go. I can't even try to think of what his life would have been like had he survived.
All the more tragic when you see the picture of henry on commissioning.

He crashed during flying training. Harold Gillies is an absolute hero of mine, it is astonishing what he accomplished
 

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goodoldboy

MIA
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View attachment 342599
Text with photo reads:
“The sawtooth bayonet was considered to be too brutal in an already barbaric war. When plunged into the victim, it caused severe pain, also pulling out the victim's insides when removed. Therefore, any prisoners captured with this version of bayonet were immediately executed.”

1st world war soldier with said sawtooth. Not sure what the face mask is?
Looks like a home-made job using a cut-down helmet - only a guess though.
 
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