Photos that make you think.

In BAOR in 1977 I had to attend an air crash , a phantom came down in Dolverden, it ploughed into a row of houses, the only casualty was the pilot, a young pilot of 29, engaged to the be married, out of RAF Bruggan, the devastation was considerable, debris was scattered over an area of many hundreds of yards. On its decent it took out some HT power lines. Having spent 3 days on site, providing power and light, watching the clean up process, and generally making myself useful, I have no illusions at to the destruction that a small plane can do, in comparison to a large cargo or passenger plane, so OUCH, doesn't quite cut it.
It is a regrettable part of the life that we have that many of us here have had to deal with sudden and unsightly death.

Many posters here have had to (and still do) attend such scenes, from Lockerbie to Falklands, NI incidents to motorway RTC's, train incidents to hospital wards and people passing away in their own homes. All are personal tragedies.

Comments that may be considered inappropriate still bounce across the site. It is a way of coping and dealing. We have all had that clenched teeth, this is really going to hurt moment and I have explained why I made that comment. I stand by it because for me it sums up every emotion in those few remaining seconds of life. One of the definitions of the word is: an extremely common term usually uttered by one experiencing physical or emotional pain, suffering or dismay.

I could have used a word beginning with F that has many many usages and would have sufficed however I chose a word that to me meant that teeth clenching, can't look away, sucking air through the teeth moment.

I am sorry if my one word comment hit a personal nerve with you and you considered it trivialising a tragedy. It was not.
 
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I can only copy @Ian525 previous quote, as OUCH!
I gave a like because I wasn't sure what else. I hope my recent post explains where I was coming from and that it was not trivialising.

Back to thread and more thinking....by the way - my avatar is George, 3 year old Jack Russell, and he is always making me think because I haven't got a clue what is going on in that twisted mind and he always seems to be one step ahead of me!
 
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29 Apr 13, National Airlines cargo Boeing 747 experiences load-shift (due to internal load not being properly secured, hence affecting centre of gravity). The rest, as they say, is history.

The really sad thing about this is that the poor f***ers flying the thing must've known the end was coming from about 15 seconds out.

Oof!
 
In BAOR in 1977 I had to attend an air crash , a phantom came down in Dolverden, it ploughed into a row of houses, the only casualty was the pilot, a young pilot of 29, engaged to the be married, out of RAF Bruggan, the devastation was considerable, debris was scattered over an area of many hundreds of yards. On its decent it took out some HT power lines. Having spent 3 days on site, providing power and light, watching the clean up process, and generally making myself useful, I have no illusions at to the destruction that a small plane can do, in comparison to a large cargo or passenger plane, so OUCH, doesn't quite cut it.
Have a tissue and stop being a total belmer.
 


29 Apr 13, National Airlines cargo Boeing 747 experiences load-shift (due to internal load not being properly secured, hence affecting centre of gravity). The rest, as they say, is history.

The really sad thing about this is that the poor f***ers flying the thing must've known the end was coming from about 15 seconds out.

The plane was transporting 5 MRAPs, 2 12 ton M-ATVs and 3 18 ton Cougars, from Camp Bastion to Dubai with a fuel stop in Bagram. The accident investigation revealed that the aircraft could have recovered from a shift of all 5 MRAPS but the rear most M-ATV ruptured the aft pressure bulkhead damaging at least 2 hydraulic lines and the horizontal stabilizer jackscrew causing a stall that was unrecoverable. (NTSB AAR-15-01)
 
It is a regrettable part of the life that we have that many of us here have had to deal with sudden and unsightly death.

Many posters here have had to (and still do) attend such scenes, from Lockerbie to Falklands, NI incidents to motorway RTC's, train incidents to hospital wards and people passing away in their own homes. All are personal tragedies.

Comments that may be considered inappropriate still bounce across the site. It is a way of coping and dealing. We have all had that clenched teeth, this is really going to hurt moment and I have explained why I made that comment. I stand by it because for me it sums up every emotion in those few remaining seconds of life. One of the definitions of the word is: an extremely common term usually uttered by one experiencing physical or emotional pain, suffering or dismay.

I could have used a word beginning with F that has many many usages and would have sufficed however I chose a word that to me meant that teeth clenching, can't look away, sucking air through the teeth moment.

I am sorry if my one word comment hit a personal nerve with you and you considered it trivialising a tragedy. It was not.


Thank you for your reply, and good grace to respond without the bile and vindictive language that infests these sites. A photo depicting tragedy is no place for flippant remarks. The photograph says it all, it is self explanatory. My reaction was maybe a little to caustic. For this I apologise.... On the up side, it has drawn out the mongs who think that death and destruction, in all its forms are a subject for scorn and levity. We now know who they are.
 
B-24 “Liberator” burns in the air during a raid on Austria, 1944.

USAAF B-24H-30-FO Liberator s/n 42-95379 "Extra Joker", 725th Bombardment Squadron (H), 451st Bombardment Group, 49th Bombardment Wing (H), 15th Air Force out of Gioia del Colle Airfield, Italy. Shot down by German fighters over Türnitz, Austria on August 23, 1944. No survivors.

A photograph taken from another aircraft by a member of the regular crew of 'Extra Joker' who'd been asked to fly separately in order to get some shots of his plane and crewmates. He lived, they all died.
 


B-24 42-94812 "Little Warrior" hit by flak moments after dropping its payload over Fallersleben,Germany on June 29, 1944. Photo taken by the waist gunner of another B-24 which narrowly avoided being taken down by 'Little Warrior'. Only one of the crew bailed out but he was beaten to death by German air raid wardens on reaching the ground.
 
In BAOR in 1977 I had to attend an air crash , a phantom came down in Dolverden, it ploughed into a row of houses, the only casualty was the pilot, a young pilot of 29, engaged to the be married, out of RAF Bruggan, the devastation was considerable, debris was scattered over an area of many hundreds of yards. On its decent it took out some HT power lines. Having spent 3 days on site, providing power and light, watching the clean up process, and generally making myself useful, I have no illusions at to the destruction that a small plane can do, in comparison to a large cargo or passenger plane, so OUCH, doesn't quite cut it.
Two crew in a Phantom, what about the back-seater? Or are you just making it up...
 
Two crew in a Phantom, what about the back-seater? Or are you just making it up...
One pilot. no second air crew, this was told to me by the snow drops that turned up about an hour later. The second day the air investigation team from Farnborough turned up. I was also told that the ground crew that serviced the airplane were quarantined, pending investigation into servicing records. After 3 days I was thanked for my services, and sent back to 1 ADSR at Verden. The area was still sealed off when I departed. That is all I know. I was not debriefed on my return.
 
One pilot. no second air crew, this was told to me by the snow drops that turned up about an hour later. The second day the air investigation team from Farnborough turned up. I was also told that the ground crew that serviced the airplane were quarantined, pending investigation into servicing records. After 3 days I was thanked for my services, and sent back to 1 ADSR at Verden. The area was still sealed off when I departed. That is all I know. I was not debriefed on my return.
Military air incidents are not investigated by Farnborough, they’re done in-house.
 
One pilot. no second air crew, this was told to me by the snow drops that turned up about an hour later. The second day the air investigation team from Farnborough turned up. I was also told that the ground crew that serviced the airplane were quarantined, pending investigation into servicing records. After 3 days I was thanked for my services, and sent back to 1 ADSR at Verden. The area was still sealed off when I departed. That is all I know. I was not debriefed on my return.
Could it be
Accident SEPECAT Jaguar GR.1 XX978, 14 Jun 1977
 
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