Photos that make you think.

looking closely at this image, their appears to have been some retouching or perhaps water droplets on the lens, if you look closely around the bumper/number plate its hazy as if photoshop has been used, and underneath the chassis of the trailer ?

found this information about the picture


Thunderbird I parked at Filton, UK, following a tow vehicle breakdown (1960)
As I posted earlier, the damage to the Bedford suggests there has been a collision of some sort. Isn't "tow vehicle breakdown" what might be said to the press or bystanders, which then gets written down for posterity.
 
I am of the generation when the Iron-lung struck absolute fear into us kids,whenever we heard someone was ill we automatically thought "Polio" it really scared us as kids.
I got the jab in 1955 at a mass immunization of children organized by the county authorities in concert with the Public Health Service. It was painful at first, (one of my first ever jabs) but the alternative of contracting polio if one didn't get the shot, and having to live your life out in an iron lung was not appealing so I sucked it up and drove on. And me mam made me have it anyway. ;-)
 
I got the jab in 1955 at a mass immunization of children organized by the county authorities in concert with the Public Health Service. It was painful at first, (one of my first ever jabs) but the alternative of contracting polio if one didn't get the shot, and having to live your life out in an iron lung was not appealing so I sucked it up and drove on. And me mam made me have it anyway. ;-)
"me mam"? I was under the impression that you were an American.
and it was about that time that we were jabbed also got serum on a sugar-lump.
 
A few SAD threads on here and Great War Forum. Seek them out and digest, again not black and white even then. Some cases are a bit odd and I have compassion for. Others? March the guilty b#stard in.
Blindfold and Alone, For examples sake and a few others give a good overview. You need to understand the wider context in each case, it can open your eyes.
There was a case of a Pte Jones of C Coy of the 9th Bn RWF, he was shot for desertion. After his sentence he was allowed to soldier on for some weeks then casually collected by the Military police and taken away to be shot. I read of his execution in a newspaper in the early 70s. I mentioned it to an ex WW1 member of 9 RWF, he completely denied that anyone in his unit had ever been executed. Quite wrongly I pushed my point, which I later realized had sadly upset the old soldier. He thought for a moment then then said. "Ok Ok yes he was! but he was not one of ours, he came from elsewhere, and anyway he was never 'up to it'" After some fifty odd years the old soldier was ashamed that someone in his unit had been executed.
Of the Royal Naval Division, one Bn had over the course of the war five people including one officer executed, because of this the Naval units was held in some contempt by Regular army units. At the base depots after the German attack of 1918 some soldiers returning from leave were posted to any unit that were short of men, because of the stigma they openly resented being sent to the Naval Div.
 
The last moments of a U.S. Air Force recon C-130 Hercules in gun camera of the Soviet MiG-17.
On September 2, 1958, a Lockheed C-130 from the 7406th Support Squadron, departed Incirlik Airbase in Turkey on a reconnaissance mission along the Turkish-Armenian border. It was to fly a course parallel to the Soviet frontier, but not approach the border closer than 100 miles (160 km).
The crew reported passing over Trabzon in Turkey at 25,500 feet (7,800 m) and then acknowledged a weather report from Trabzon, but that was the last communication received from the flight. It was later intercepted and shot down by four Soviet MiG-17s 34 mi (55 km; 30 nmi) north-west of Yerevan. The six flight crew were confirmed dead when their remains were repatriated to the United States, but the 11 intelligence-gathering personnel on board have never been acknowledged by Soviet / Russian authorities

 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer


"Of course I'll need a knife and fork for lunch mvulana."
 


June 17, 1939: Last Person to be Publicly Executed in France​
On June 17, 1939, Eugen Weidmann was executed by guillotine on the charges of conspiracy, kidnapping, fraud, robbery, murder, and resisting arrest. The “hysterical behavior” by spectators was so scandalous that French President Albert Lebrun immediately banned all future public executions. Unknown to authorities, film of the execution was shot from a private apartment adjacent to the prison. British actor Christopher Lee – who was 17 at the time – witnessed the event.
 


June 17, 1939: Last Person to be Publicly Executed in France​
On June 17, 1939, Eugen Weidmann was executed by guillotine on the charges of conspiracy, kidnapping, fraud, robbery, murder, and resisting arrest. The “hysterical behavior” by spectators was so scandalous that French President Albert Lebrun immediately banned all future public executions. Unknown to authorities, film of the execution was shot from a private apartment adjacent to the prison. British actor Christopher Lee – who was 17 at the time – witnessed the event.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer


June 17, 1939: Last Person to be Publicly Executed in France​
On June 17, 1939, Eugen Weidmann was executed by guillotine on the charges of conspiracy, kidnapping, fraud, robbery, murder, and resisting arrest. The “hysterical behavior” by spectators was so scandalous that French President Albert Lebrun immediately banned all future public executions. Unknown to authorities, film of the execution was shot from a private apartment adjacent to the prison. British actor Christopher Lee – who was 17 at the time – witnessed the event.
I take it there was no TV to watch in France then.
 

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