Photos that make you think.

Poor bastard must've cracked.
A bit outside the normal shell-shock mode though.
From the book, Blindfold and Alone;

Ingham and Longshaw were discovered on a Swedish ship at Dieppe, having discarded their uniforms and claiming to be American citizens. No army on active service and under appalling pressure - the men were arrested during the Battle of the Somme, in which they had themselves taken part - could overlook such behaviour, especially at a time when many saw prison or penal servitude as an appealing alternative to the hazards of the field.
 

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Poor bastard must've cracked.

The thing that amazes me about ww1 is how the vast majority put up with these battles without breaking.

There's no way more cynical subsequent generations could sustain an effort like the Somme, 3rd Ypres or Verdun in my view.
The battles will have been bad enough, but what about then being wheeled out to shoot someone who might have been a mate, or who you had shared a beer or three with? That must have been a hell of a job!
 


An Iron Lung.
Which kept polio victims breathing
The fate of many who contracted Polio prior to the introduction of the Salk vaccine.

Although some were allowed out of the machine for short periods, many would spend their lives in such machines and I understand that there are still one or two in operation.
heres a little know fact
William Morris, the motor magnate not the flowery curtain bloke, noted that a member off his staff was absent and asked about him, on being told that the chap was taking his child to London to be put on an Iron Lung, William asked why the Local hospital in Oxford did not have one, it seems there was only a small handful in the country, he sent his engineers to inspect such a machine, and to create the drawings for producing one at his Cowley Plant, once done he provided them free to hospitals 5,000 of them !!! one reason why the previous owner of my Morris would never entertain any other make of Motor car than a Morris, have had a family member treated in such a machine, can you imagine a modern motor magnate giving away all of his fortune to Philanthropy as William Morris, later Lord Nuffield did, and living in modest means

William Morris: the humble lifestyle of Britain's greatest philanthropist revealed


 
This photo looks to be gen but the Ssgt Gunner appears to be a pegleg on the right leg side.

Were there ever any peglegs in the RA?

I think @ExREME..TECH has the same pic as his avatar but I haven`t seen him for a while.

It looks like a Thunderbird missile similar to the one that used to be the Guardian at SEE Arborfield.

View attachment 338541
looking closely at this image, their appears to have been some retouching or perhaps water droplets on the lens, if you look closely around the bumper/number plate its hazy as if photoshop has been used, and underneath the chassis of the trailer ?

found this information about the picture


Thunderbird I parked at Filton, UK, following a tow vehicle breakdown (1960)
 
Last edited:


origional caption
An Australian dispatch rider firing a rifle on a motorcycle during training in Romsey, Australia. 1917.

in reality, I wonder how long it took to dissuade him from trying this trick ?
 

Auld-Yin

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origional caption
An Australian dispatch rider firing a rifle on a motorcycle during training in Romsey, Australia. 1917.

in reality, I wonder how long it took to dissuade him from trying this trick ?
The shooter or photographer? :p
 
Haitham Abu Sabla with a tear gas canister- fired by Israeli soldiers- embedded in his face. Pic by Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/ Reuters.
View attachment 337506
He was on life-support after having it surgically removed.

Questionable. There were also several other pictures made around the same time, involving others faking different injuries, jumping on and off stretchers and so on. Do you really think a teargas can would have the velocity to penetrate someones head, and if it did so that somehow the heat produced would not result in it being pulled out no matter what the damage, or that the 'gas' (actually a smoke) would not result in asphyxiation if the person took no action?
 
heres a little know fact
William Morris, the motor magnate not the flowery curtain bloke, noted that a member off his staff was absent and asked about him, on being told that the chap was taking his child to London to be put on an Iron Lung, William asked why the Local hospital in Oxford did not have one, it seems there was only a small handful in the country, he sent his engineers to inspect such a machine, and to create the drawings for producing one at his Cowley Plant, once done he provided them free to hospitals 5,000 of them !!! one reason why the previous owner of my Morris would never entertain any other make of Motor car than a Morris, have had a family member treated in such a machine, can you imagine a modern motor magnate giving away all of his fortune to Philanthropy as William Morris, later Lord Nuffield did, and living in modest means

William Morris: the humble lifestyle of Britain's greatest philanthropist revealed


When I was a young soldier there was a Nuffield Centrein London and we used to travel up from Aldershot on week-ends to get cheap/free cinema and theatre tickets tickets.
 


Sir Hiram Maxim and Sigmond Loewe demonstrate the effectiveness of the Maxim machine gun to a Chinese minister by shooting down a tree, 1896.

its frightening to think of the advances made to this weapon by 1914
 
i seem to recall from the film Wannsee they then went above and beyond what was outlined in their own laws with anyone being classed of mixed blood being condemned.
I had a university lecturer whose Austrian father had married a Jewish woman from London, luckily as she was English the Nazis had no record of her race and he was able to get her out of the Reich and back to London's east end before the war began.
 
Poor bastard must've cracked.

The thing that amazes me about ww1 is how the vast majority put up with these battles without breaking.

There's no way more cynical subsequent generations could sustain an effort like the Somme, 3rd Ypres or Verdun in my view.
I think they just got sucked into it- in the early stages by misplaced enthusiasm- not wanting to “miss out”- patriotism and peer pressure, and in the later stages, compulsion. By the time the poor buggers were manning the trenches there wasn’t much else they could do but obey orders.
There is a degree of irony in your post: on one hand wondering how the guys put up with it, and on the other commenting on someone who didn’t put up with it and was shot for his pains.
 
I think they just got sucked into it- in the early stages by misplaced enthusiasm- not wanting to “miss out”- patriotism and peer pressure, and in the later stages, compulsion. By the time the poor buggers were manning the trenches there wasn’t much else they could do but obey orders.
There is a degree of irony in your post: on one hand wondering how the guys put up with it, and on the other commenting on someone who didn’t put up with it and was shot for his pains.

Some independent contemporary writers like McBride (a US citizen serving in Canadian forces) observed that British ordinary soldiers appeared to be motivated by genuine anger at German aggrandisement, and its destructive intrusion into what was in those days actually a very ordered and peacefully developing European society - especially in Britain, which arguably was by far the most advanced society of the time. He opined that they thought they had a job to do, and that their service wasn't simply driven by blind patriotism.

An additional observation would be that, of course, most soldiers weren't in horrendous conditions or bloody battles for most of the time. The military routine and physical workload (digging, wiring, carrying, working shifts, etc) was quite amenable to men who were mostly drawn from agricultural or industrial backgrounds, and who nearly all came from fairly austere homes. Death itself was no stranger at a time of high infant mortality and the lack of effective treatments for common infections and diseases.

Theres actually a strong theme in memoires written after the war about how institutionalised the men felt they had become (mates & cameraderie, plentiful food, straightforward task-orientated work, pay, clothing, medical care, paternalistic care, often significantly more "down time" than in their civilian occupations, etc), and that the trauma of demobilisation and - often - subsequent unemployment was in many cases worse than that of the war itself.
 
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