Photos that make you think.

Lidici in Czechoslovakia was wiped off the face of the earth as part of the reprisals for the assassination of Heydrich.
All that remains today!

Lidice_Memorial_2010_09.jpg


The Murder of 82 Children from the Czech Village LIDICE in Chelmno

At dawn on June 10, all the residents of Lidice, a village ten miles outside Prague, were taken from their homes. They were shot in batches of ten at a time behind a barn. By late afternoon, 192 men and boys and 71 women had been murdered. The other women were sent to concentration camps. The children were dispersed, some to concentration camps, although a few who were considered sufficiently Aryan were sent to Germany. The SS then razed the town and tried to eradicate its memory. The name of Lidice was expunged from all official records.
 

Ruby Bridges being escorted to school by US Marshals

Former United States Deputy Marshal Charles Burks later recalled,
"She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn't whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we're all very, very proud of her".


link Ruby Bridges
 
Vickers Wellington B Mk1 production at Brooklands factory in 1939. Geodesic structure of the fuselage can be clearly seen. (Photo BAE Systems Archive)

welly1.jpg


Conventional design was frames over a covered skin connected by spars running through them - by going for the design you see in the picture the structure is stronger as the stress is divided throughout. This meant the structure could retain its shape with parts blown out of it.

My respect for bomber crews is already high, but seeing this photo has made me think that a bit of wood/thin metal and painted canvas was all that stood between the aircrew and lots of red hot shrapnel!
 
Vickers Wellington B Mk1 production at Brooklands factory in 1939. Geodesic structure of the fuselage can be clearly seen. (Photo BAE Systems Archive)

View attachment 335496

Conventional design was frames over a covered skin connected by spars running through them - by going for the design you see in the picture the structure is stronger as the stress is divided throughout. This meant the structure could retain its shape with parts blown out of it.

My respect for bomber crews is already high, but seeing this photo has made me think that a bit of wood/thin metal and painted canvas was all that stood between the aircrew and lots of red hot shrapnel!

Designed by Dr Barnes Wallace, He of " Bouncing bomb" fame.
 
Vickers Wellington B Mk1 production at Brooklands factory in 1939. Geodesic structure of the fuselage can be clearly seen. (Photo BAE Systems Archive)

View attachment 335496

Conventional design was frames over a covered skin connected by spars running through them - by going for the design you see in the picture the structure is stronger as the stress is divided throughout. This meant the structure could retain its shape with parts blown out of it.

My respect for bomber crews is already high, but seeing this photo has made me think that a bit of wood/thin metal and painted canvas was all that stood between the aircrew and lots of red hot shrapnel!
I recently re-read Bomber and read Combat Crew for the first time.

I can’t remember which is which but both mention that you could push a pencil or a screwdriver through the skins of a Lancaster/B29. Reassuring for the crew.

On the upside the thinness meant that 20mm cannon shells would sometimes pass right through the aircraft.
 
I recently re-read Bomber and read Combat Crew for the first time.

I can’t remember which is which but both mention that you could push a pencil or a screwdriver through the skins of a Lancaster/B29. Reassuring for the crew.

On the upside the thinness meant that 20mm cannon shells would sometimes pass right through the aircraft.
Bulletproof costs weight.
united-states-air-force-usaf-fairchild-republic-a-10-titanium-bathtub.jpg

A10.
If you make the whole aircraft bulletproof then delete the air part of its description.
 
Bulletproof costs weight. View attachment 335529
A10.
If you make the whole aircraft bulletproof then delete the air part of its description.
Interesting picture.

Reminds me of something I read about Skyraiders in Vietnam. When the Vietnamese eventually learnt to shoot at aircraft (once Russians had taught them to fire ahead of the aircraft) they fitted an “armoured bath” under the pilot.

I guess it must have looked a bit like that.
 
Interesting picture.

Reminds me of something I read about Skyraiders in Vietnam. When the Vietnamese eventually learnt to shoot at aircraft (once Russians had taught them to fire ahead of the aircraft) they fitted an “armoured bath” under the pilot.

I guess it must have looked a bit like that.
Big bugger supposed to be made of titanium.
BUT at the same time, Lockheed were trying to corner the US market for the stuff, to build SR-71s with.
So there were compromises made re the use of steel, thus adding a lot of extra weight
 
Vickers Wellington B Mk1 production at Brooklands factory in 1939. Geodesic structure of the fuselage can be clearly seen. (Photo BAE Systems Archive)

View attachment 335496

Conventional design was frames over a covered skin connected by spars running through them - by going for the design you see in the picture the structure is stronger as the stress is divided throughout. This meant the structure could retain its shape with parts blown out of it.

My respect for bomber crews is already high, but seeing this photo has made me think that a bit of wood/thin metal and painted canvas was all that stood between the aircrew and lots of red hot shrapnel!
Grandad Alec reckoned that flack would go through anything that flew like shit through a goose with the exception of Lanc pilots seat armour ( no use if it came from the front though) The wimpey he liked for its stability and as you say the fact that you could bite huge lumps out of it and the empennage would stay attached. It was only if the elevator cables ( and the elevator trim) were shot away were you in the poo big time.
 
I recently re-read Bomber and read Combat Crew for the first time.

I can’t remember which is which but both mention that you could push a pencil or a screwdriver through the skins of a Lancaster/B29. Reassuring for the crew.

On the upside the thinness meant that 20mm cannon shells would sometimes pass right through the aircraft.
It was mentioned in 'Bomber',read it again last week during a period of enforced 'idleness'. One of the best anti-war books I have ever read.
 
It was in that camp that Gary met Steve Kemble. After their release he introduced him to his brother Martin and Spandau Ballet was formed...
I can’t help but think that the woman hardly conforms to the Nazi racial ideal!

I would though. I’d tell someone that her bloke was a war criminal, get him carted off to Nuremberg and offer to “comfort” her in my place.
 
Last edited:
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
msr ARRSE: Site Issues 1
PartTimePongo ARRSE: Site Issues 37
F Current Affairs, News and Analysis 2

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top