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Photos that make you think.

There was a thing on Saturday Review just now about a woman called Marina Amaral. She is famous for colourising B&W photographs.

There is a good four minute video of her work on her web page. Lots of military pics. Here:

About

Some people argue that this is disrespectful of history but I disagree. The B&W photos are there for posterity and historical accuracy but I think the colourising adds a vibrancy.

I also wonder if the colourised pictures are more appealing to the younger population who can not grasp the concept of B&W (doubly so if there are subtitles!).
Thanks for that.

Two points. 1) After colourisation the subjects now look like actors in a modern historical drama. 2) We, well, certainly I, sometimes forget when looking at b/w movies that in their lives, at that time there was actually colour.

Amazing.
 

Ryan Kellys Pulitzer winning shot of Nazi sympathizer James Alex Fields, Jr driving into the crowd in Charlottesville. The backstory to this is that he had already quit as a photographer and taken a job in a brewery and this was his last assignment. I particularly like how the guys in mid air are in focus and the bystanders arent . That and the little 'love' sign top right.
 
Horrific injuries man you must have a fantastic mental attitude to not only survive them but to carry on with your life.
Not meaning to offend but looking at that photo reminds me of the Black Knight in Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
I worked with a bloke who had an above the knee amputaion he joined some sort of an agency and when needed he works on movies depicting casualties getting limbs blown off. He wouldn't say how much he was paid but did say it was worthwhile money wise and was good fun.
Amputees in Action, an interesting bunch to work with.
 
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That dog.jpg


Made me think....what`s that bloody dog`s name again?
 
Squaddies on litter patrol.
Not the most thought provoking photo

View attachment 331964

However once the photo is put into context....
These soldiers are in Lockerbie in December '88 looking for debris from Pan Am 103.
A gruesome task to which I am grateful I didn't have to do.

Richard A. Marquise Collection An inventory of the collection in the Pan Am Flight 103/Lockerbie Air Disaster Archives at Syracuse University
I was on a course with a sweaty sock who did that. He had clear images of finding bodies in threes. Fortunately I was at the other end of the country then.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Squaddies on litter patrol.
Not the most thought provoking photo

View attachment 331964

However once the photo is put into context....
These soldiers are in Lockerbie in December '88 looking for debris from Pan Am 103.
A gruesome task to which I am grateful I didn't have to do.

Richard A. Marquise Collection An inventory of the collection in the Pan Am Flight 103/Lockerbie Air Disaster Archives at Syracuse University
We came within a ball hair of being sent. The police declared it a murder investigation (which meant we couldn't touch the evidence) while we were waiting for the coaches to turn up. I have always been very glad we didn't go, especially as one RHF lad I knew never properly recovered from the things he saw there.
 
Squaddies on litter patrol.
Not the most thought provoking photo

View attachment 331964

However once the photo is put into context....
These soldiers are in Lockerbie in December '88 looking for debris from Pan Am 103.
A gruesome task to which I am grateful I didn't have to do.

Richard A. Marquise Collection An inventory of the collection in the Pan Am Flight 103/Lockerbie Air Disaster Archives at Syracuse University
A few of the imagery analysts at JARIC were tasked with examining air photos of the debris trail to try and locate the bodies and other human remains etc. Many of the remains were eventually recovered from tree tops, and thick brush where the lack of leaves meant that they culd be seen relatively easily from the air.

I was based at JARIC at the time, on my last 6 months before leaving the army. Fortunately for me I went off on leave the day before it all happened in order to catch up on some pre-release course paperwork and my boss decided that he had enough manpower on hand to do the task without recalling me from leave. Apparently it wasn't a pleasant task but a lot less harrowing than for the troops who had to go out and collect the remains.
 
I’ll add to that by saying it shows the true professionalism of the Armed Forces, not just the British in this instance, but the Danes.

I’ll always remain proud of serving and those I had the good fortune to serve with. What happenned to me was a consequence of the job I loved and I was fortunate that job also provided the means for me to survive and possibly enjoy life. Those in other occupations are not so lucky.
@dingerr, I have a drink in my hand and it has just been raised in your direction.
 

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