Photos that make you think.

Back in my dim & increasingly distant yoof... my first tour was on South Georgia and before arriving in Grytviken we made landfall in Stromness where Shackleton reaches civilisation

A very desolate spot indeed but I am more than certain of what it represented to them
As an aside, I almost took out Sir Ernest’s grave with an 84mm TATP round - it looked very similar to the target we were firing at across the bay when looking through the sight. I had a feeling something wasn’t quite right though - then clocked that the target didn’t have a little white fence around it.


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Of course I'm not the slightest bit jealous!

I never managed to get to SG during my Falklands tour, but reading the Shakleton story whilst experiencing a South Atlantic winter, gave me a small (albeit comfortable) idea of what they faced.
Glad you never took out Sir Ernest's grave stone! Explain that to the insurance company!
I was lucky enough to spend my entire tour there - even extended as it was either go back to the Falklands early or stay an extra month over and above my 4 month tour - due to the way the ships were scheduled. As I’d heard nowt but crap about working at HQ BFFI &, even worse, what I’d seen of living on the Coastels whilst passing through Stanley on my arrival down south, I opted to extend for a month.







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Company called African Parks are trying to get six white rhinos from SA to Sudan. They want to do it in one hop into an unimproved strip in the park and have permission from local authorities to do that, but a bit stuck with aircraft that can do the job. Their intention is to do it in one hop to avoid African bureaucratic you-give-to-me fuckwittery when they clock a high value cargo with an expiry date on it.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
Which resulted in the deaths of over 800 men.

USS Franklin (CV-13) - Wikipedia
Which in turn has got me thinking... Its unlikely that all those 800 died before the ship finally sank (same applies to most sinkings really). For any unfortunate enough to be trapped in an air pocket as it begins its descent, would the air pressure in that pocket increase as they went down?
 
Which in turn has got me thinking... Its unlikely that all those 800 died before the ship finally sank (same applies to most sinkings really). For any unfortunate enough to be trapped in an air pocket as it begins its descent, would the air pressure in that pocket increase as they went down?

She didn't sink she made it back home so presumably the 800 where killed in the initial attack?
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
She didn't sink she made it back home so presumably the 800 where killed in the initial attack?
That will teach me to not read the link! Same principle though - what would kill those trapped in airpockets first, increasing airpressure or suffocation?
 
That will teach me to not read the link! Same principle though - what would kill those trapped in airpockets first, increasing airpressure or suffocation?
It would appear that the damage was caused by only two bombs
One of which hit the aircraft fuel storage areas and the aircraft that were fuelled up ready to fly.
The fire from that seems to have done most of the damage with many crewmen reported to have been blown overboard presumably some of the poor sods jumped to avoid the fire.
It would appear many of the guys trapped in air pockets etc were saved
 
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Company called African Parks are trying to get six white rhinos from SA to Sudan. They want to do it in one hop into an unimproved strip in the park and have permission from local authorities to do that, but a bit stuck with aircraft that can do the job. Their intention is to do it in one hop to avoid African bureaucratic you-give-to-me fuckwittery when they clock a high value cargo with an expiry date on it.
Sounds like a job for........

skyvan.jpg
 
Company called African Parks are trying to get six white rhinos from SA to Sudan. They want to do it in one hop into an unimproved strip in the park and have permission from local authorities to do that, but a bit stuck with aircraft that can do the job. Their intention is to do it in one hop to avoid African bureaucratic you-give-to-me fuckwittery when they clock a high value cargo with an expiry date on it.
Knew a Zimbo vet who was helping som zoo in the UK to move/ fly a young ele back to the UK.

All the paperwork was in hand, ele in its crate ready to be stuck in the back of a transporter aircraft.

Zimbo vet asked the UK vet what he will do if the ele kicks off and try’s to break loose.

UK vet says , “ Oh I have a humane killing bolt gun “

Zimbo vet asks.


“ Do you have any idea how thick an eles skull is”?

Take this its my 375 magnum.
 
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Around 2500 NM non stop with six rhinos in the back? Herc may be able to hack it with external tanks and three rhinos at a time. Need a better plan.
C5 all the way. I know they've moved elephants by C17, but the C5 has a bit more 'wriggle room' and it would be a good photo op for USAF Heavy Lift: C-5 Galaxy Fun Facts
The cargo compartment of the C-5 will hold 100 model 113 (Beetle) Volkswagens, 106 Vegas, 90 Ramblers, 58 Cadillacs, or 6 standard Greyhound buses.
C17 loading an elephant:

 
Unprepared strip. African Parks bloke I spoke to gave me the gen so I guess they're also still trying to figure out how to do it.

And then they need to figure out how to pay for it. The rhinos will have a 24 hour armed guard as well when they get to their new home. I suppose with the influx of Chinese in Africa it's necessary to prevent them being turned into headache powder.
 
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