Photos that make you think.

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
It was amazing that after the sinking of the three destroyers that anyone survived let alone were rescued in what must have been horrendous sea conditions.
One destroyer survived a 110 degree roll.
 
In a reverse engineered kind of way, I thought “WTF?” then took the picture... View attachment 327038
(Dining room in Brasenose College)
It was explained to me on an open day there that the penis was added as a protest to the fact that women were now allowed to attend Brasenose; the idea being that women would be too delicate to eat in the same room as it.

Predictably, the women didn’t give a ****.
 
It was explained to me on an open day there that the penis was added as a protest to the fact that women were now allowed to attend Brasenose; the idea being that women would be too delicate to eat in the same room as it.

Predictably, the women didn’t give a ****.
It was a woman that pointed it out to me...
 
German soldier being marched to captivity at Stalingrad 1943, after what must have been a grim time trapped in the encirclement, his face knows that Russian revenge will be brutal and probably wishes he'd died in the fighting...
22-14.jpg
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
German soldier being marched to captivity at Stalingrad 1943, after what must have been a grim time trapped in the encirclement, his face knows that Russian revenge will be brutal and probably wishes he'd died in the fighting... View attachment 327053
Ivan knows how to deal with an illegal immigrant ..
 
View attachment 327035
The mountains of South Georgia that Shackleton, Crean and Worsley had to cross to reach the Stromness Bay whaling station.

The whole Shackleton story is full of feats of endurance, unbelievable courage and the strength of the human spirit. none more so IMHO than the hike across South Georgia.

Ernest Shackleton and the Endurance expedition,page 4 - South Georgia again and rescue attempts
Back in my dim & increasingly distant yoof... my first tour was on South Georgia and before arriving in Grytviken we made landfall in Stromness where Shackleton reaches civilisation

A very desolate spot indeed but I am more than certain of what it represented to them
As an aside, I almost took out Sir Ernest’s grave with an 84mm TATP round - it looked very similar to the target we were firing at across the bay when looking through the sight. I had a feeling something wasn’t quite right though - then clocked that the target didn’t have a little white fence around it.


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German soldier being marched to captivity at Stalingrad 1943, after what must have been a grim time trapped in the encirclement, his face knows that Russian revenge will be brutal and probably wishes he'd died in the fighting... View attachment 327053



It is interesting to see some of the figures on this event "In 1956 after Konrad Adenauer made it an international incident, the Soviets finally released the last of their German POW's. Only 5,000 of the original 90,000 captured at Stalingrad were still alive"

In the course of my work, I travelled several times to the DDR and one of the senior political controllers of the industry I dealt with, claimed to have been captured there, He explained his survival was due to the fact when he had been posted to the Eastern front his mother had given him a book on Russian.
When he was captured he used his knowledge to act as interpreter for the guards on the march to Siberia. When he was there claimed to have been a communist and was selected for training & was one of the first group of Germans sent to the DDR to help run it for the Russians. He carefully confided in me that joining the Army at the wars start he had claimed to be a Nazi to ensure he was ok. He said in reality he was apolitical and only interested in looking after No1, himself. Interesting bloke with some nasty stories of the march & the gulags.
 
Back in my dim & increasingly distant yoof... my first tour was on South Georgia and before arriving in Grytviken we made landfall in Stromness where Shackleton reaches civilisation

A very desolate spot indeed but I am more than certain of what it represented to them
As an aside, I almost took out Sir Ernest’s grave with an 84mm TATP round - it looked very similar to the target we were firing at across the bay when looking through the sight. I had a feeling something wasn’t quite right though - then clocked that the target didn’t have a little white fence around it.


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Of course I'm not the slightest bit jealous!

I never managed to get to SG during my Falklands tour, but reading the Shakleton story whilst experiencing a South Atlantic winter, gave me a small (albeit comfortable) idea of what they faced.
Glad you never took out Sir Ernest's grave stone! Explain that to the insurance company!
 
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This quote always rattles around my skull whenever I hear or see a post about Sir Ernest Shackleton:

"“For scientific discovery give me Scott; for speed and efficiency of travel give me Amundsen; but when disaster strikes and all hope is gone, get down on your knees and pray for Shackleton.” Sir Raymond Priestly, Antarctic Explorer and Geologist."

I can never remember the whole thing, so I googled it and first result was this wordpress blog thingy:

Get down on your knees and pray for Shackleton
 
Back in my dim & increasingly distant yoof... my first tour was on South Georgia and before arriving in Grytviken we made landfall in Stromness where Shackleton reaches civilisation

A very desolate spot indeed but I am more than certain of what it represented to them
As an aside, I almost took out Sir Ernest’s grave with an 84mm TATP round - it looked very similar to the target we were firing at across the bay when looking through the sight. I had a feeling something wasn’t quite right though - then clocked that the target didn’t have a little white fence around it.


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A disgusting creature for the subject of a photograph.

That walrus thing isn't too good neither.
 
Back in my dim & increasingly distant yoof... my first tour was on South Georgia and before arriving in Grytviken we made landfall in Stromness where Shackleton reaches civilisation

A very desolate spot indeed but I am more than certain of what it represented to them
As an aside, I almost took out Sir Ernest’s grave with an 84mm TATP round - it looked very similar to the target we were firing at across the bay when looking through the sight. I had a feeling something wasn’t quite right though - then clocked that the target didn’t have a little white fence around it.


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82 and 83 I was on the FI but my best mate was a Radio Tech and went to SG.

Shooting elephant seals with 84 TATP , 66, seemed the norm. The remains of the whaling station had been there for what, 100 years, the Argies started the “ conflict” by trying to take it away by salvage.

After the “ conflict” in SG more whaling buildings and real estate was destroyed by the Army post 82 . Doing training.
 
Back in my dim & increasingly distant yoof... my first tour was on South Georgia and before arriving in Grytviken we made landfall in Stromness where Shackleton reaches civilisation

A very desolate spot indeed but I am more than certain of what it represented to them
As an aside, I almost took out Sir Ernest’s grave with an 84mm TATP round - it looked very similar to the target we were firing at across the bay when looking through the sight. I had a feeling something wasn’t quite right though - then clocked that the target didn’t have a little white fence around it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
82 and 83 I was on the FI but my best mate was a Radio Tech and went to SG.

Shooting elephant seals with 84 TATP , 66, seemed the norm. The remains of the whaling station had been there for what, 100 years, the Argies started the “ conflict” by trying to take it away by salvage.

After the “ conflict” in SG more whaling buildings and real estate was destroyed by the Army post 82 . Doing training.
I don’t recall any of the buildings being destroyed during my 5 months there. In fact we were at pains to preserve it as was. The only thing we did was maintenance of survival huts out & about.

Never shot any seals either - though we did undertake authorised culls of reindeer to keep the population under control.


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