Photos that make you think.

Sorry for the link but it highlights what I thought. Obviously the big cities lost the most in numbers, but as a percentage of the population it was the northern towns and Scotland who suffered, probably due to the pals battalions. I'm sure there are mining communities in Wales and indusrial areas of Ireland with similar tales.
Map shows British towns and cities where WWI wiped out tens of thousands of people | Daily Mail Online

But it was the northern and Scottish towns that saw their populations hardest hit. In Durham 6,300 men lost their lives. This was equivalent to almost two in ten men in the city and nearly eight per cent of the total population.

Another Country Durham town, Bishop Auckland, was also it hard losing more than six per cent of just 13,600 people, all of them men between 18 and 50-years-old.
Derby lost almost six per cent of its population and Dumfries five per cent, according to genealogy company Ancestry.


Nine of the 10 towns and cities that lost the highest proportion of their population are in Northern England and Scotland.

As for the unluckiest villages I would look for a village in a mining area, although it's not a record anyone would want.
Thanks for that. I live in Dorset but was born in Bishop Auckland and grew up in one of the neighbouring pit villages. However to me it seemed usual that a small Dorset village could lose someone in both Iraq and Afghanistan.
 
Continuing the WW1 casualty theme the map below certainly gave me cause to think .... for a while I went to school in Tynemouth ...

WW1 Casualties in North Shields.jpg


... every yellow dot is a residence with a casualty .
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Sorry for the link but it highlights what I thought. Obviously the big cities lost the most in numbers, but as a percentage of the population it was the northern towns and Scotland who suffered, probably due to the pals battalions. I'm sure there are mining communities in Wales and indusrial areas of Ireland with similar tales.
Map shows British towns and cities where WWI wiped out tens of thousands of people | Daily Mail Online

But it was the northern and Scottish towns that saw their populations hardest hit. In Durham 6,300 men lost their lives. This was equivalent to almost two in ten men in the city and nearly eight per cent of the total population.

Another Country Durham town, Bishop Auckland, was also it hard losing more than six per cent of just 13,600 people, all of them men between 18 and 50-years-old.
Derby lost almost six per cent of its population and Dumfries five per cent, according to genealogy company Ancestry.


Nine of the 10 towns and cities that lost the highest proportion of their population are in Northern England and Scotland.

As for the unluckiest villages I would look for a village in a mining area, although it's not a record anyone would want.

Mining was a reserved occupation so not conscripted so should have been safer.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Thanks for that. I live in Dorset but was born in Bishop Auckland and grew up in one of the neighbouring pit villages. However to me it seemed usual that a small Dorset village could lose someone in both Iraq and Afghanistan.

Brora, near me, has an entire family of 3 brothers and a sister who died in ww1 as well as a GW1 death on it.
 
Mining was a reserved occupation so not conscripted so should have been safer.
Good point, well presented.
Maybe mining villages is not a good example. However the villages around industrial centres probably have the highest percentage of losses, specially in WWI, Of course the mining communities also provided the majority of tunnellers, although not in vast numbers.
 
Sorry for the link but it highlights what I thought. Obviously the big cities lost the most in numbers, but as a percentage of the population it was the northern towns and Scotland who suffered, probably due to the pals battalions. I'm sure there are mining communities in Wales and indusrial areas of Ireland with similar tales.
Map shows British towns and cities where WWI wiped out tens of thousands of people | Daily Mail Online

But it was the northern and Scottish towns that saw their populations hardest hit. In Durham 6,300 men lost their lives. This was equivalent to almost two in ten men in the city and nearly eight per cent of the total population.

Another Country Durham town, Bishop Auckland, was also it hard losing more than six per cent of just 13,600 people, all of them men between 18 and 50-years-old.
Derby lost almost six per cent of its population and Dumfries five per cent, according to genealogy company Ancestry.


Nine of the 10 towns and cities that lost the highest proportion of their population are in Northern England and Scotland.

As for the unluckiest villages I would look for a village in a mining area, although it's not a record anyone would want.
The village of 'Slaughterford' in Glos is one of the WW1 'Thankful Villages' There were quite a few of them about the UK. But to go to the other side of the scale the village of 'Cwm'* in the Ebbw Valley Monmouthshire, lost a big percentage of it's menfolk. * Pronounced Combe' and means Valley.
 
My old home village of Neilston (a few miles outside of Glasgow) only got its own War Memorial in 2015. Prior to that the hundreds of men we lost in WW1 and WW2 had to be commemorated in the nearby town of Barrhead on Remembrance Sunday.

For the size of the village, Neilston got hammered, yet not once when I was at school there did any teacher bother telling us about it.
 
Mining was a reserved occupation so not conscripted so should have been safer.
Mining was a reserved occupation in WWII but I'm not sure about WWI. Because it was so unpleasant and dangerous a lot of miners joined up to get away from the pits. The famous RE tunnelling companies were never short of volunteers because the money was good and the army actually cared about the miners safety more than peacetime employers did.
 
Good point, well presented.
Maybe mining villages is not a good example. However the villages around industrial centres probably have the highest percentage of losses, specially in WWI, Of course the mining communities also provided the majority of tunnellers, although not in vast numbers.
Agreed: Even though Mining became a Reserved occupation later, some Bns were made up almost entirely of miners.The Durhams for example. The 3rd Bn of The Monmouthshire Regiment was made up almost entirely of Miners. Some members of these Bns were posted to Tunneling Companies early in the war, while other Bns were formed as .Pioneer Battalions.
 
The village of 'Slaughterford' in Glos is one of the WW1 'Thankful Villages' There were quite a few of them about the UK. But to go to the other side of the scale the village of 'Cwm'* in the Ebbw Valley Monmouthshire, lost a big percentage of it's menfolk. * Pronounced Combe' and means Valley.
Cwm is the next village up from mine.

It's a weird word for someone who's not Welsh or who hasn't spent a lot of time in the valleys to pronounce. Try saying " Come" with a Mancunian accent and your fairly close.
 
interesting to me that as I was born and bred in the next village and wasn't aware of that fact.
I do know that some o the Cwm boys went on to fight up at Archangel in 1919 my Granddad was one.
 
interesting to me that as I was born and bred in the next village and wasn't aware of that fact.
I do know that some o the Cwm boys went on to fight up at Archangel in 1919 my Granddad was one.
I have the Cwm casualty list for one Bn that the Cwm men were part of, I will dig it out. It all happened on the 8th of May 1915, when the silly practice of placing 3 Bns of one Regiment in the line side by side. But as it was once said to me "They were the Prussian Guard and we stopped them in their bloody tracks" then a pause "Who the hell did they think they were?" That was a 75 year old ex Miner talking!
 
Mining was a reserved occupation so not conscripted so should have been safer.
My understanding was that Britain didn't really do reserved occupations during the first world war until mid way in. With the general belief it would last a campaign season at best and the general rush of enlistment at the start, I don't think the concept was considered until it was suddenly an issue.

I seem to recall chatting with a royal west kent reenactor who was saying farmers and other people with important skills had to be released.

No figures or quotes to back this up, and it may not have been an rwk reenactor but it makes sense. On one side of my family were all kentish farmers and various brothers and they all enlisted.
 
No Thankful villages in Scotland or Ireland.
Scotland: That's a fact and I've seen the village war memorials up there, lists of the same names are many, and pitiful to read. Most of the thankful villages; I assume, just like in the Cotswold were rural and men were posted to Cavalry units which Gen Haig hardly used throughout the war, They were used to plug gaps at Ypres early on, but then withdrawn. Just an assumption.
 
That's either Aberbeeg or Waunllywd then mush. The river is really healthy these days , Salmon and Sewin running up it.
I remember the river jet black. The Howey River in the Sirhowey Valley is almost drinking water now. As a boy I watched men drag coal sludge into buckets out of the Howey, mix a trowel of cement into it, place in tins and let it dry to make 'coal Briquettes' cheap and effective it was. Now the trout saunter in and out of the 'shallows' Great! But little money in the valley now.
 
Read about the USAAF in WW2.
Apparently the RAF had told them to issue all their aircrew with Identity pics of them in civvie clothing, in case they got shot down, so they could be used to make ID cards etc by the local resistance, who had little access to photographic supplies.
Lo and behold, many of the yanks were nicked very quickly - all the pics had them wearing the same jacket and tie!

The initials G.I. originally come from Galvanized Iron which was stamped on US Army kit such as bins.
Post 1942 the initials were used to man Government or General Issue the words Government Issue was printed on I.D. cards.
So many men rushed to join up after Pearl that the word Issue was spelt with only one s on I.D. cards
Because so many where issued it was left as was rather than try and correct it.

During the Battle of the Bulge the Germans infiltrated the American Army miss-directing traffic etc
Once word was out the Americans started asking questions such as who was third baseman for the Yankees.
This was a good quiz for fresh troops but some such as the Airborne had been gone for over 2 years so didn't know the answers.
It was found that you could detect the German Commandoes by simply asking for their I.D. cards.
The German forgers had corrected the spelling of Issue
 
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