Photos that make you think.

I think the more killing everyone is involved in though, the better your chances of people turning a blind eye or it being dealt with at unit level (not legal, poster out, bollocked whatever).
As the SS themselves discovered.

Not a route I'd ever like to see the British Army ever go down, though.
 
Great story, theatrically (and lucratively) recounted many times by Zimbardo, but the SPE remains controversial.
First, it only lasted six of the intended 14 days.
Second, with only 21 participants, the experiment was underpowered (McGreal (2013) estimates that 132 subjects would have been needed to achieve a statistically significant result).
Third, the findings were never published in a peer reviewed psychology journal (Reicher and Haslam, 2006).
Fourth, the design of the experiment made it ethically impossible to repeat (any experiment that cannot be repeated will suffer a credibility hit).
Fifth, by playing an active role Zimbardo failed to remain independent of the experiment, causing Krueger (2008) to dismiss it as not qualifying as an experiment at all.
Sixth, the participants were representative of neither the US prison staff/inmate population (or the US population in general) nor were they recruited in an unbiased way.
Seventh, Zimbardo has been accused by participants (John Mark) and external observers as going "out of his way to create tension" (Gray, 2013).
Finally, if the effect of deindividuation was as inescapable as Zimbardo implies, why is violence and brutality in prisons not being committed continually at an epidemic scale?

Reicher and Haslam repeated the experiment as closely as modern ethics allows and, whilst acknowledging that group-level effects do occur, they ended up by drawing far more conservative conclusions about group behaviour than Zimbardo.

SPE is best viewed for what it was: an early psychology experiment that could have been improved. Even Milgram's experiment was conducted many times and in many variations.

Just sayin', like...
Aye, great story, but what happened, happened.
 
back in the day, 25kg dry powder extinguishers were the Acme of dispersal fire fighting equipment for use on a helicopter containing 1200lb of Avtur. In this practice it fails dismally to deal with 5l of benz in a scrap car.
Me: *this is more fun than sweeping the hangar*
Aircrew(watching from a place where they won’t get their boots muddy):
*we’re f*cked*

To further enhance the day, the car ( not, as it turned out, scrap, but ‘in storage’ while the owner was on course) was parked in the old small arms range. This is the range where the bowser mongs dumped the fuel from the water/sediment checks... which leached into the drains... under the burning car... We realised this when the Greenie Tiffy (standing on the concrete drain cover to keep his boots clean) was launched into the air by the exploding drain.
Nowadays I think even Mythbusters couldn’t have made this work (all in a day’s work for the Emperor of course)...


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So, I was walking down the Rue Balguerie in Akaroa, NZ, as you do, past a house that I had walked past quite a few times in my many visits to Akaroa (not rich just lucky enough to have relatives there!) and for the first time ever I noticed the following plaque. The Shackleton Expedition has always fascinated me and I have read many books on the subject so to accidentally discover this, with much excitement on my part much to the amusement of wife/family, was absolutely fantastic no matter how trivial it seemed to them! They were then subjected to more than they could have ever of hoped for in terms of an expedition description which I thought was educational and I dutifully ignored their protestations to "talk about something else, it's not that exciting." Peasants the lot of them!

SR201892 Feb. 22 19.05.jpg


And whenever I see the death of an old warrior like Frank Worsley that is before the end of WW2 (using this as an example), I always think to myself that I wish they could have hung on to see the Germans et al defeated as I am sure they would have liked to have known the full time result. Funny how the mind works.
 

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Was watching something on TV and it reminded me of a question that I had heard once on Brain of Britain and prompted a touch of googling and stumbled across this which I found interesting about the Thankful or Blessed Villages (which are settlements in England and Wales from which all their members of the armed forces survived World War I because wikipedia says so):



From the Telegraph:

No surprise, then, that the most elaborate testament to the safe return of a village’s male population, at Catwick, in East Yorkshire, has never been on public display. Knowledge of its existence owes much to the research of Norman Thorpe, who, with his colleagues, has put together a website cataloguing the experiences of the Thankful Villages.

“When the men of the village joined up in 1914-18, the village blacksmith, John Hugill, nailed a coin for each man to the doorpost below a lucky horseshoe just inside his forge,” says Thorpe. “Thirty men joined, so there were 30 coins, and they all returned. One of the men did lose an arm, though, so John Hugill took one of the coins off, cut a piece out of it, and nailed it back again.”

Even more surprisingly, the same thing happened in the Second World War, with 30 men going off to fight and 30 men returning. This makes Catwick one of the dozen or so Doubly Thankful villages, never to lose a man in either war.

Far from being displayed in pride of place in the village, though, the luck-bringing relic is kept in a safe place by the blacksmith’s grandson, a local engineer who also goes by the name of John Hugill.

“It’s a family heirloom, we keep it safe at home, and it only sees the light of day occasionally,” says Mr Hugill Jnr. “The thing is, people don’t readily talk about these things. I remember finding out one day, to my great surprise, that the old village postmaster had been at the D-Day landings. He never ever spoke about it, as far as I knew.
No Thankful villages in Scotland or Ireland.
 
First a picture of the White Rabbit, Edward Yeo-Thomas, (and it seems appropriate as we discussed the White Mouse (Nancy Wake) earlier) in a forged ID card:

Read about the USAAF in WW2.
Apparently the RAF had told them to issue all their aircrew with Identity pics of them in civvie clothing, in case they got shot down, so they could be used to make ID cards etc by the local resistance, who had little access to photographic supplies.
Lo and behold, many of the yanks were nicked very quickly - all the pics had them wearing the same jacket and tie!
 
Last edited:
So, I was walking down the Rue Balguerie in Akaroa, NZ, as you do, past a house that I had walked past quite a few times in my many visits to Akaroa (not rich just lucky enough to have relatives there!) and for the first time ever I noticed the following plaque. The Shackleton Expedition has always fascinated me and I have read many books on the subject so to accidentally discover this, with much excitement on my part much to the amusement of wife/family, was absolutely fantastic no matter how trivial it seemed to them! They were then subjected to more than they could have ever of hoped for in terms of an expedition description which I thought was educational and I dutifully ignored their protestations to "talk about something else, it's not that exciting." Peasants the lot of them!

View attachment 323300

And whenever I see the death of an old warrior like Frank Worsley that is before the end of WW2 (using this as an example), I always think to myself that I wish they could have hung on to see the Germans et al defeated as I am sure they would have liked to have known the full time result. Funny how the mind works.
Might he be related to the late Henry Worsley, who died early in 2016 on a polar expedition?
 
No harm to the animals, so why the tank tape..... SF donkey....?



CFB
They may be related to some of the readers of the Daily Post or may have had a relationship with them. You can't be too careful in Wales.
 
I saw this in a Berlin Museum recently, it's the engine from a British Bomber shot down over Berlin late in the War. On close examination I noticed that every individual piece of metal on the engine had been worked on by hand, there were file marks over most of it. It had been dug up from a few metres under the soil.
British Bomber Engine.jpg
 
Might he be related to the late Henry Worsley, who died early in 2016 on a polar expedition?
Well spotted and good question! I never put 2+2 together on the names. Off I went to ask Google and this is what I found:

This is what wikipedia says "It has been stated, without clear evidence, that he was distantly related to Frank Worsley, the captain of explorer Ernest Shackleton's ship, the Endurance."

This is what his obituary says in the Telegraph: "A special forces veteran who had served in Bosnia and Afghanistan, Worsley was a descendant of Frank Worsley, Sir Ernest Shackleton’s skipper on Endurance, and confessed to being a Shackleton obsessive."

This is what the New Yorker says: "He was delighted to discover that Frank Worsley, a trusted member of one of Shackleton’s expeditions, was a distant relative of his, and had written his own thrilling memoir, in which he described braving an “unending series of blizzards, gales and blinding snowstorms.”

And there are a lot of other articles that repeat this. I don't think they seem the sort that would fabricate a link to Frank Worsley so I am going to believe he was.
 
I saw this in a Berlin Museum recently, it's the engine from a British Bomber shot down over Berlin late in the War. On close examination I noticed that every individual piece of metal on the engine had been worked on by hand, there were file marks over most of it. It had been dug up from a few metres under the soil.
View attachment 323401
Just out of interest, which museum - the Luftwaffe Museum at Gatow?
 
Test Pilot George Aird ejects from his Lightning Fighter after his flight controls failed at 100 feet on final approach.
Aird landed on a greenhouse and went through the roof breaking both legs
Initially dismissed as a fake the photo was confirmed to be true.

Firstly, possibly the most interesting thread ever. Interesting photo but it’s your avatar that also has a back story.

It’s the USAF display team pairs lead making a bollocks of it bottoming out of a loop. He’d mis set the altimeter.

Oops. There’s also a selfie video of the event somewhere.
 
Just out of interest, which museum - the Luftwaffe Museum at Gatow?
No, it was up the Unter den Linden, maybe 2km from the Brandenburg Gate on the left of the road, It is a fine Museum, you will need half a day in there.
Incidentally I was very impressed with how the Public Building in East Berlin have been renovated to the very highest of standards, there was no 'cuffing it' and some are 17th Century. It is far better done than West Berlin, just my opinion. Thanks for the info on the Luftwaffe Museum, that will be for next time.
 
Was watching something on TV and it reminded me of a question that I had heard once on Brain of Britain and prompted a touch of googling and stumbled across this which I found interesting about the Thankful or Blessed Villages (which are settlements in England and Wales from which all their members of the armed forces survived World War I because wikipedia says so):



From the Telegraph:

No surprise, then, that the most elaborate testament to the safe return of a village’s male population, at Catwick, in East Yorkshire, has never been on public display. Knowledge of its existence owes much to the research of Norman Thorpe, who, with his colleagues, has put together a website cataloguing the experiences of the Thankful Villages.

“When the men of the village joined up in 1914-18, the village blacksmith, John Hugill, nailed a coin for each man to the doorpost below a lucky horseshoe just inside his forge,” says Thorpe. “Thirty men joined, so there were 30 coins, and they all returned. One of the men did lose an arm, though, so John Hugill took one of the coins off, cut a piece out of it, and nailed it back again.”

Even more surprisingly, the same thing happened in the Second World War, with 30 men going off to fight and 30 men returning. This makes Catwick one of the dozen or so Doubly Thankful villages, never to lose a man in either war.

Far from being displayed in pride of place in the village, though, the luck-bringing relic is kept in a safe place by the blacksmith’s grandson, a local engineer who also goes by the name of John Hugill.

“It’s a family heirloom, we keep it safe at home, and it only sees the light of day occasionally,” says Mr Hugill Jnr. “The thing is, people don’t readily talk about these things. I remember finding out one day, to my great surprise, that the old village postmaster had been at the D-Day landings. He never ever spoke about it, as far as I knew.
I wonder if there is such a thing as a cursed village? There is a little village just outside Poole called Lytchet Matravers. A lovely place with a war memorial in the centre of the village. It has the usual WWI and WWII names, plus a member of the RAF (pilot, perhap) killed in the village during WWII and a name for both Iraq and Afghanistan.
 
Read about the USAAF in WW2.
Apparently the RAF had told them to issue all their aircrew with Identity pics of them in civvie clothing, in case they got shot down, so they could be used to make ID cards etc by the local resistance, who had little access to photographic supplies.
Lo and behold, many of the yanks were nicked very quickly - all the pics had them wearing the same jacket and tie!
I have my father's photo that was taken for just this purpose, it has a degree poignancy that is relieved by the knowledge that he never heeded to use it.
 
I wonder if there is such a thing as a cursed village?
Sorry for the link but it highlights what I thought. Obviously the big cities lost the most in numbers, but as a percentage of the population it was the northern towns and Scotland who suffered, probably due to the pals battalions. I'm sure there are mining communities in Wales and indusrial areas of Ireland with similar tales.
Map shows British towns and cities where WWI wiped out tens of thousands of people | Daily Mail Online

But it was the northern and Scottish towns that saw their populations hardest hit. In Durham 6,300 men lost their lives. This was equivalent to almost two in ten men in the city and nearly eight per cent of the total population.

Another Country Durham town, Bishop Auckland, was also it hard losing more than six per cent of just 13,600 people, all of them men between 18 and 50-years-old.
Derby lost almost six per cent of its population and Dumfries five per cent, according to genealogy company Ancestry.

Nine of the 10 towns and cities that lost the highest proportion of their population are in Northern England and Scotland.


As for the unluckiest villages I would look for a village in a mining area, although it's not a record anyone would want.
 
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