Photos that make you think.

Baglock

On ROPS
On ROPs
Also one of the main characters in The Pacific TV series, reading about him on Wiki has led me to purchase his book and both by Robert Leckie, Okinawa and Helmet for my Pillow. I've not read any of them as yet as due to getting a couple of books from @Sixty recently also led to my purchase of the Emperor and Conqueror series of books by Conn Iggulden which I'm wading through.
Both excellent memoirs written in very different styles.

The Sledge book is standout for me. Chilling stuff.

Eugene Sledge also wrote a follow up called China Marine. This covers the occupation of China in late 45 to early 46 while he was awaiting discharge and his adjustment to civilian life. Worth a read
 
I was still smoking in football grounds long after the Bradford tragedy
From memory, and I was policing grounds well after Bradford, modern stands were made of flameproof materials, Ie concrete and steel and smoking was permitted and continued. Older stands were wooden like the Bradford stand. Some of them 100years old and the Bradford fire led to a review and realisation of their fire risk. No smoking in those stands was enforced, as was a clean out of the flammable debris under the stands.
Many is the happy hour I spent in the toilets and internal vomitories of tynecastle old stand (a first world War era wooden stand only recently replaced) reminding uncooperative fans intent on smoking, not to.
 
**** sake. As I said earlier, I could see how you’d casually shoot the guards out of hand.
Watching the footage, you can see the raw hatred on the escorts' faces. I bet they were just praying for an excuse.
 
Also one of the main characters in The Pacific TV series, reading about him on Wiki has led me to purchase his book and both by Robert Leckie, Okinawa and Helmet for my Pillow. I've not read any of them as yet as due to getting a couple of books from @Sixty recently also led to my purchase of the Emperor and Conqueror series of books by Conn Iggulden which I'm wading through.
I did exactly the same after watching the pacific. Both good reads and each with their own style; my theory was this was due to one being written in the 50’s and the other the 80’s but my friends theory is that it was more down to training (journalist v scientist).

Well worth a read.

I found sledge to be a very engaging character and had to remember that this wasn’t fiction on occasion. I’m glad I was born when I was.
 
Also one of the main characters in The Pacific TV series, reading about him on Wiki has led me to purchase his book and both by Robert Leckie, Okinawa and Helmet for my Pillow. I've not read any of them as yet as due to getting a couple of books from @Sixty recently also led to my purchase of the Emperor and Conqueror series of books by Conn Iggulden which I'm wading through.
I can recommend the book written by Eugene Sledge about his time in the Pacific.
 
Following on from last nights excellent documentary about convoy PQ17.
How do you hide a battleship?
trying_to_hide_tirpitz_by_121199-da8jin3.jpg

Trying to hide the Tirpitz.
 
Five Chimneys by Olga Lengyel.

A truly disturbing read.
Yes, I have looked at parts of that and just shake my head.

@Stanchion if you follow this link: Ravensbrück: training center for SS female guards - AHRP and Google around some of the names, accounts, books, trial transcripts that you can find by using google, there you can piece together a lot of what went on.

One of the reports I read said that rape and the sexual abuse of women was never part of the trials - the reason being was that the women had been humiliated enough already and coupled with the stigma associated with it, they felt they already had enough to go on. That said the figures of how many female SS guards there were and how many were prosecuted, is rather low.
 
It is even more chilling to me when you see the video of the bulldozer in action. I remember coming across it when some pages back Josef Kramer was posted and it came up in one of the links about him and his lover Irme Grese. But, also in this video, seeing the way that the unbelievably emaciated bodies are treated doesn't even come close to imagining what suffering they must have endured to reach the pitiful state that they were in.

I believe that there was a form of poetic justice for the German Staff involved in the disposal of the bodies .... I am sure I read that many died of Typhus shortly afterwards .
 
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A friend just sent me this link as he knows I am interested in SOE, Bletchley Park, and all that "stuff":

First a picture of the White Rabbit, Edward Yeo-Thomas, (and it seems appropriate as we discussed the White Mouse (Nancy Wake) earlier) in a forged ID card:



And this is a link to the article in the Daily Mirror about a new book that is out:

World War II forgery factory that helped our spies fool Hitler revealed for first time

And by pure coincidence I was going to post this link to Violette Szabo and her George Cross recommendation that is a short video of a very nice chap reading out extracts from her personal record held by the National Archives (it doesn't appear to have been digitized). And all this before she reached the age of 24.

 
Eugene sledge, just after the battle of Okinawa June 1945.

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Perhaps due to his position slightly further back as a mortarman in K/3/5 1st Marine Division he was one of a few to make it through the battles of Pelielu and Okinawa unwounded. Some 450 men went through his company at Okinawa and another 235 at Pelielu. By his own admission he was amazed that he was only one of 7 men who made it through those campaigns without being killed, wounded or breaking down due to combat fatigue.

His combat memoir 'With the Old Breed at Pelielu and Okinawa' is the most haunting I've ever read, partly because of the scientific style of narrative honed by his post war career as a professor I think.

The following description of the battle for sugar loaf hill at Okinawa sounds like something out of Verdun

By twos and threes, the Company K men forming the front line eased onto a barren, muddy, shell-torn ridge named Half Moon Hill and into the foxholes of the company we were relieving….It was the most ghastly corner of hell I had ever witnessed…The place was choked with the putrefaction of death, decay and destruction. In a shallow defilade to our right…lay about twenty dead Marines, each on a stretcher and covered to his ankles with a poncho… but as I looked out I saw that other Marine dead couldn’t be tended properly. Every crater was half full of water, and many of them held a Marine corpse. The bodies lay pathetically just as they had been killed, half submerged in muck and water, rusting weapons still in hand. Everywhere lay Japanese corpses, killed in the fighting. Swarms of big flies hovered above them…For several feet around every corpse, maggots crawled about in the muck… I believed we had been flung into hell's own cesspool.
Also one of the main characters in The Pacific TV series, reading about him on Wiki has led me to purchase his book and both by Robert Leckie, Okinawa and Helmet for my Pillow. I've not read any of them as yet as due to getting a couple of books from @Sixty recently also led to my purchase of the Emperor and Conqueror series of books by Conn Iggulden which I'm wading through.
Both excellent reads


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I think this is probably the most shocking picture I have ever seen.

Human beings reduced to the status of rubble because someone thought they had all the answers and an utter belief in the righteousness of what they were doing.

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Repeat about a million times for full effect.

I can’t help but think that poor Sapper didn’t sleep well for many years.
Sad that this inhumanity has been repeated many times since e.g the Killing Fields, Rwanda etc

Lessons learnt - I don't think so.
 
Further to books on Okinawa, I've recently read a book which impressed me a great deal and I can highly recommend it.
It's about a son's quest to find out about his father's demons caused as a result of his experiences in Okinawa.

'Bringing Mulligan Home' by Dale Maharidge.
 
Further to books on Okinawa, I've recently read a book which impressed me a great deal and I can highly recommend it.
It's about a son's quest to find out about his father's demons caused as a result of his experiences in Okinawa.

'Bringing Mulligan Home' by Dale Maharidge.
Read it the other week, not a bad read and I found it quite interesting.
 
Sad that this inhumanity has been repeated many times since e.g the Killing Fields, Rwanda etc

Lessons learnt - I don't think so.
I’m not sure it’s a lesson we can learn. The nazis didn’t invent brutality, they just went about it in a very systematic way (how very German of them). History shows us that if you put people in an environment where there are opposed groups and few consequences for even the most horrific actions then you end up with babies on spikes pretty quickly.
 

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