Photos from WWI: Christina Broom

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#3
Yes, very good find Dozy.
I find this one interesting.
Centre of picture, in front of third pile, tall ouen with eyes left.
This Doughboy looks like he's either black or Indian. (as in Injun.)



I didn't think the Septics mixed troops of 'other' colours until after the Second War.
Can anyone confirm or confute this ?
 
#4
President Harry Truman signed an executive order desegregating the Armed Forces in 1948. Prior to that time Blacks and whites did not serve together in the same unit.
I'm not sure what the deal was for American Indians (we don't like the perjorative term "Injuns") but they did serve in WW I.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#5
Ruckerwocman said:
President Harry Truman signed an executive order desegregating the Armed Forces in 1948. Prior to that time Blacks and whites did not serve together in the same unit.
I'm not sure what the deal was for American Indians (we don't like the perjorative term "Injuns") but they did serve in WW I.
Purely to differentiate, (for the Brits,) from people from Injah.

On the other hand, while speaking to a group of members of what the rabbit people now call "Native Americans," those same "Native Americans" said they preffered the term 'Indians.'

As the Septics say - go figure.
 

Pararegtom

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
If you look at Max Arthur,s Faces of WW1, you will see many of the photo,s by Cristina Bloom.
 
#10
Gremlin said:
Whiskybreath said:
Good snaps. I saw this one today from an even earlier period, which I rather liked:



They don't like it up 'em, you know.

(from http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cyberheritage/work/)
That pic gave me the giggles and like you my first thought was of 'Jonesy'.

Someone clearly did some research into pre-WWI 'accepted stance for weapons drill' when it came to Dad's Army!
I thought it was a pic taken after defence cuts had done away with their horses.
 
#11
Cutaway said:
Yes, very good find Dozy.
I find this one interesting.
Centre of picture, in front of third pile, tall ouen with eyes left.
This Doughboy looks like he's either black or Indian. (as in Injun.)



I didn't think the Septics mixed troops of 'other' colours until after the Second War.
Can anyone confirm or confute this ?
I suspect that if an octoroon was raised white, talked white, moved white and he was alright no one would ever treat him as anything other than white.
 
#12
Ruckerwocman said:
President Harry Truman signed an executive order desegregating the Armed Forces in 1948. Prior to that time Blacks and whites did not serve together in the same unit.
I'm not sure what the deal was for American Indians (we don't like the perjorative term "Injuns") but they did serve in WW I.
I cannot find a precise reference but I think that Native Americans were fairly well integrated into the US Army and were not segregated into seperate units like Black Americans although there were some specialized signal units using "Code Talkers" and Scout units in the area of the Mexican border.

I know Chinese were integrated into the Army. My dad served in Boston, billeted in a hotel taken over by the Army and his roomate and best friend in the service Jeff C*** was Chinese. This despite the fact that the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, in effect until 1943 restricted Chinese from immigration and citizenship. It was a product of labor unions pressure on Congress. Even when the law was repealed in '43 Chinese had to have a US citizen sign documents vouching for them when they applied for citizenship. Dad signed for all of Jeff's family and they used to refer to him as their "Godfather". A sad bit of US history that angered my dad until the day he died.
 
#13
eodmatt said:
Gremlin said:
Whiskybreath said:
Good snaps. I saw this one today from an even earlier period, which I rather liked:



They don't like it up 'em, you know.

(from http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cyberheritage/work/)
That pic gave me the giggles and like you my first thought was of 'Jonesy'.

Someone clearly did some research into pre-WWI 'accepted stance for weapons drill' when it came to Dad's Army!
I thought it was a pic taken after defence cuts had done away with their horses.
That's Tidworth, last week!
 
#14
If you notice they're nearly all wearing the SD or 'Crap Hat'. The term was coined because of their colour, laid on the floor they looked like a horse dollop. Some also wear them at a jaunty angle or low on the bridge of the nose, once a soldier!

Reference the swarthy soldier it's equally possible that he was Southern Italian or Spanish or even Galway Irish who tended to have black hair and swarthy complexions.

A good find Dozy, thanks for that.
 
#15
As an aside, reading Steven Graham's A private of the Guards, the British Army of 1917 included many US volunteers. A sizeable majority of them opted to serve in the Guards and many were killed or wounded in March and October 1918.
 
#16
There was a programme recently about a Red Indian (showing my age there) who was a sniper in the WW1 trenches, and extremely successful, with I think around thirty 'kills'. There were descriptions in the regimental diaries of his patience and lying out in no-man's land for hours. His life was ended by a German sniper unfortunately.

In the programme his granddaughter was taken to his grave, where she burnt feathers and did some rituals. It was extremely moving.

I have a feeling that Ian Hislop was involved in the programme, and stood a few feet away until the lady composed herself after the ritual. In the same programme he talked about an Indian from India who fought in WW1 and died in Brighton, and was allowed an outdoor cremation as per the rites of his religion, although it was illegal in the UK at the time.

A rambling post to say that I guess at that time anyone who had good shooting skills would have been extremely welcome.

And that Ian Hislop is a top bloke.
 
#17
Grownup_Rafbrat said:
There was a programme recently about a Red Indian (showing my age there) who was a sniper in the WW1 trenches, and extremely successful, with I think around thirty 'kills'. There were descriptions in the regimental diaries of his patience and lying out in no-man's land for hours. His life was ended by a German sniper unfortunately.

In the programme his granddaughter was taken to his grave, where she burnt feathers and did some rituals. It was extremely moving.

I have a feeling that Ian Hislop was involved in the programme, and stood a few feet away until the lady composed herself after the ritual. In the same programme he talked about an Indian from India who fought in WW1 and died in Brighton, and was allowed an outdoor cremation as per the rites of his religion, although it was illegal in the UK at the time.

A rambling post to say that I guess at that time anyone who had good shooting skills would have been extremely welcome.

And that Ian Hislop is a top bloke.
It was a programme called 'Not Forgotten' and was part of a series by Ian. He also visited Hull where we have a 'Street Monument' which was roll of honour for the lads from that street who were killed. This is a picture of it.

 
#18
I think one of these officers (I think the 3rd from the right with the 'tache) is John Kipling, son of Rudyard. John went missing in the Battle of Loos and his remains were not identified in Kipling senior's life. See "My boy Jack".
 

Attachments

#19
Whiskybreath said:
Good snaps. I saw this one today from an even earlier period, which I rather liked:



They don't like it up 'em, you know.

(from http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cyberheritage/work/)
I wonder if the strange stance is because fixed bayonets were a defensive stance in those days where the enemy would advance on the 'square'? No insider knowledge so would be interested if any infantiers or military historians can shed some light on this.
 
#20
Looks like "prepare to receive cavalry/fuzzy-wuzzies". I've no doubt that it is something like that - they're using same "feet at right angles" stance as you do in Taekwondo and other martial arts where you have to brace for impact.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top