Phone location

Apologies if this has been covered before and/or if this is posted in the wrong place. Normal arrangement - feel free to transfer if required!

Inspired by the 999 thread https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/why-still-999-for-the-police-fire-service-or-medical-assistance.297825/ I'd like to ask about the following:

We were out with friends last night and they 'knew of' an arrangement or App, whereby if you are involved in an accident, or lost or whatever, you call up and your mobile phone gives you 3(?) words (dog, banana yacht? ( and from this the emergency services can find your location to within a few metres. Seemingly it is at least Europe wide.

Can anyone confirm, elucidate etc?
 

tgo

Old-Salt
Yes it exists, if you're on Android here is the app.


And what it does:

The what3words app helps you find, share and navigate to any precise location.

We’ve given every 3m x 3m in the world a unique 3 word address. This simple and accurate way to talk about location makes it easier to meet up with friends, discover and tell others about amazing places, and explore the world without getting lost.

You’ll see 3 word addresses displayed by hotels, restaurants, travel guides and websites. They can be used in 40 languages and are much simpler to remember, use and communicate than regular addresses. They’re also far more accurate and reliable.

Use the app to:
- Find your way to anywhere in the world, even where street addresses don’t exist
- Tell your friends precisely where your picnic is
- Always find your tent at festivals
- Tell your taxi exactly where you want to go
- Plan and share your off-roading or hiking waypoints
- Know exactly where you parked your car
- Get deliveries to a specific entrance
 
What three words Google it
 

BaldBaBoon

War Hero
Apparently works quite well.

I tried putting this forward as a thing that could be used with us in the emergency services to better locate an incident, either from the public using it to report or officers using it to direct extra resources.....but apparently the concept was just too mind blowing and was recieved rather like warm.
 
Apparently works quite well.

I tried putting this forward as a thing that could be used with us in the emergency services to better locate an incident, either from the public using it to report or officers using it to direct extra resources.....but apparently the concept was just too mind blowing and was recieved rather like warm.
It already is by fire and ambo.
 
Apparently works quite well.

I tried putting this forward as a thing that could be used with us in the emergency services to better locate an incident, either from the public using it to report or officers using it to direct extra resources.....but apparently the concept was just too mind blowing and was recieved rather like warm.
Could well be coming to a (smart) storm near you in the future.
 
Apparently works quite well.

I tried putting this forward as a thing that could be used with us in the emergency services to better locate an incident, either from the public using it to report or officers using it to direct extra resources.....but apparently the concept was just too mind blowing and was recieved rather like warm.
We were looking at it in my line of work. I have two main concerns with it.

Firstly, it’s elective. It’s only really available if you’ve (a) got the phone (b) have downloaded the app (c) have practiced with it and (d) have the nous to use it in emergency. In the particular circumstance I was looking at, the users also needed to be able to use it in a foreign language.

Secondly, it’s commercial. It’s only around as long as the developers are willing to maintain it and update it.
 
We were looking at it in my line of work. I have two main concerns with it.

Firstly, it’s elective. It’s only really available if you’ve (a) got the phone (b) have downloaded the app (c) have practiced with it and (d) have the nous to use it in emergency. In the particular circumstance I was looking at, the users also needed to be able to use it in a foreign language.

Secondly, it’s commercial. It’s only around as long as the developers are willing to maintain it and update it.
And thirdly, I went online and typed in my home adress to see what 3 words they had given it and it showed a grid square 60m away down the street! I then typed in my sisters old London address and it didn't even recognise it but gave me somewhere in Boise, Idaho!
 
And thirdly, I went online and typed in my home adress to see what 3 words they had given it and it showed a grid square 60m away down the street! I then typed in my sisters old London address and it didn't even recognise it but gave me somewhere in Boise, Idaho!
Obviously developed by a gunner then :)
 
I just put the app on our two phones and stepped outside to test it. With the location 'High Degree of Accuracy' turned on it not only gave me the right address it also showed I was in the back garden shed.

So if you are on the lam from the po-po and get a call asking for your three words have a back up list ready.

Do not ever give your 3 words to a Septic caller or you might find a drone missile bouncing off your noggin.
 

JJWRacing

Swinger
Well it wouldn't work in the all or the Forest of Dean, Most of Cornwall and everywhere else that companies say you have total 4G coverage but lied, ask Airwave/EE who were doing the ESN project total bollocks.
 

Toppet

War Hero
Apparently works quite well.

I tried putting this forward as a thing that could be used with us in the emergency services to better locate an incident, either from the public using it to report or officers using it to direct extra resources.....but apparently the concept was just too mind blowing and was recieved rather like warm.
I believe it is recognised by the emergency services in some areas.
 
I used it last week to report a pothole to the council's highways people. The following day, a council employee drives up to the pothole, has a look at their mobile phone then looks at the pothole and today the pothole was filled in. The app seems to work.
 

Unremarkable

Old-Salt
There is or was a nursing home in Gwent that kept its six figure OS map reference by the phone, essential for the Emergency Services given the remote location.

That's how it's done, if one can, of course.
 

NSP

LE
Yes it exists, if you're on Android here is the app.


And what it does:

The what3words app helps you find, share and navigate to any precise location.

We’ve given every 3m x 3m in the world a unique 3 word address. This simple and accurate way to talk about location makes it easier to meet up with friends, discover and tell others about amazing places, and explore the world without getting lost.

You’ll see 3 word addresses displayed by hotels, restaurants, travel guides and websites. They can be used in 40 languages and are much simpler to remember, use and communicate than regular addresses. They’re also far more accurate and reliable.

Use the app to:
- Find your way to anywhere in the world, even where street addresses don’t exist
- Tell your friends precisely where your picnic is
- Always find your tent at festivals
- Tell your taxi exactly where you want to go
- Plan and share your off-roading or hiking waypoints
- Know exactly where you parked your car
- Get deliveries to a specific entrance
Er, yeah - does this not rely on you knowing where you are in the three-word code? Clue: haven't a Scooby where I am on that system. Surely it's easier to switch your 'phone GPS on and when the alert "The emergency services want you to share your location. Yes/No?" comes up, tap yes...?

Or switch GPS on and say, "Google Maps/OpenStreetMap says I'm here" to the operator or say, "I'm at this lat/long or OSGB grid ref....?"

I'm given to understand that if you are registered for the text-to-999 service and your device has a GPS position this is tagged onto your text to 999, if you send one. Job done...
 

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