Pheasant breasts

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
OK, I've treated myself to a couple of these from the local farm shop. I'm thinking of casseroling them with some red wine, chicken stock, mushrooms and carrots, and scoffing with roast potatoes, sprouts and cauliflower. Starting with onions and garlic as a base for the casserole, of course.

Any have any better suggestions for them, and any idea whether adding a few raisins to the casserole will improve the dish?

Eyethangyew.
 
#2
Yes just sit and stare at them and give them the occasional cheeky fondle
 
#3
Sorry I thought they were pleasant breasts
 

mysteron

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
I suggest that rather than boil the beejezus out of them, slice thinly, fry with some garlic and fresh thyme and then use the juices while the meat is resting to make a jus using a healthy dose of red wine to deglaze the pan.

Serve with posh chips (wedges done in the oven with a light sprinkling of chilli flakes and generoulsy seasoned) and oven roasted veg.

Quicker, more tasty and you get the benefit of being able to eat the meat without chewing for half an hour each time you take a bite.

Edited: Indeed - my shout is a refined version of this: Click me, Click me, oooooooooo just there baby.

Edited second time for mong typing.
 

Fronty

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#5
You _could_ casserole them, or you could obtain some roquefort and walnuts, stuff the breasts with a mix of the two and crushed garlic, then wrap with proscuto/parma ham and grill until lovely and tender, but with crispy ham on top.

Of course, you would need to serve this with al dente sugar snap peas, asparagus and a baked sweet potato fr the full effect, and might I suggest robust and full bodied red to accompany? Maybe something from the New World?
 
#6
Jeeze my mouth is watering. Whats for breakfast in the morning? Oh, rice again. Bugger.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
Fronty said:
You _could_ casserole them, or you could obtain some roquefort and walnuts, stuff the breasts with a mix of the two and crushed garlic, then wrap with proscuto/parma ham and grill until lovely and tender, but with crispy ham on top.

Of course, you would need to serve this with al dente sugar snap peas, asparagus and a baked sweet potato fr the full effect, and might I suggest robust and full bodied red to accompany? Maybe something from the New World?
They sound nice, but I don't have those things in my cupboard. And have you seen the price of asparagus and sugar snap peas at this time of year!

Nice ideas from everyone though, and thank you. I feel peckish already.
 
#8
Personally I would lightly fry off in butter, put to one side and rest, deglaze with red wine and add some recurrant jelly, a splash of red wine vinegar add a knob of butter too add a gloss to create your sauce.

Serve with a mustard potato mash, Parsnip chips and seasonal veggies such as carrots, leeks and purple sprouting or calabrese.

Have a cheeky light red wine for drinking
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
Yum, thank you.

Decisions, decisions!
 
#11
Cabana said:
I prefer lady breasts covered in chocolate sauce.
Not in season and a bugger to cook correctly I find
 
#12
re-stilly said:
Cabana said:
I prefer lady breasts covered in chocolate sauce.
Not in season and a bugger to cook correctly I find

You jest surely...they are always in season...just sometimes not once a month. Cooking is your mistake, they should just be nibbled raw...like sushi and that cold soup that you don't cook for some reason.
 
#13
Cabana said:
re-stilly said:
Cabana said:
I prefer lady breasts covered in chocolate sauce.
Not in season and a bugger to cook correctly I find

You jest surely...they are always in season...just sometimes not once a month. Cooking is your mistake, they should just be nibbled raw...like sushi and that cold soup that you don't cook for some reason.
it is that time in my house, and I will put the candles away and try them raw next time, cheers for the tip
 
#14
Well now I hear that some like hot candle wax dribbled on the breasts...which enhance their taste...especially if they are those flavoured candles.

It is a terrible thing when it is that time. I fear for you I do.
 
#15
Gently shallow fry in butter with mushrooms, pepper and a pinch or so of paprika then, when they are nearly done, horse in some cream and let it all bubble away for a bit.

Last time I did it (mon) I had it with rice. Lovely.

If you like the breasts try a whole bird but see if you can get someone to bone the whole thing out. The trouble with pheasant I find is that is has exactly the same anatomy as a chicken regarding bones and the number of tendons, etc, but all crammed into a much smaller space.

If you get it boned you can simply wrap the meat around some stuffing, tie it off, and roast the beauty.
 
#16
http://www.game-to-eat.co.uk/recipes

Ingredients

1 large tub of double cream

4 - 6 Pheasent / Partridge breasts

1 Very large glass of brandy

Salt & Pepper

Butter

Notes


Lightly fry the breasts in butter. Then add the cream to the pan. Add the brandy to taste with the salt and pepper. Let simmer for a few minuets and then serve.

As you add the brandy this will thin the cream, if it gets too thin for your liking add corn flower.

Serving Suggestion
Serve with roasted mushrooms and steamed carrots. The sauce is rich so dont make the veg.
or

ngredients

4 x pheasant breasts (young hen breasts if possible as they won t be so tough)
4 large rashers, lightly smoked bacon
500ml/17fl oz dry cider
5 shallots
butter
1 tsp caster sugar
30g/1oz plain flour
100ml/7tbsp full fat crème fraîche
Method

1. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
2. Butter the pheasant breasts and then wrap in the bacon. Place in an ovenproof dish (so that they aren t too cramped together) and then pop in the oven for 25 minutes.
3. After 25 minutes reduce the oven temperature to 170C/325F/Gas 3, pour 250ml/8 fl oz of the cider over the pheasant breasts, cover with a lid or tin foil, and return to the oven for another 60 minutes.
4. Towards the ending of the cooking time for the pheasants, pour the remaining cider into a saucepan and reduce by about half.
5. Thinly slice the shallots and cook very slowly in a little butter until soft. Then add the caster sugar and continue to cook until lightly caramelised. Remove off the heat until ready to finish the sauce.
6. Check the pheasant breasts during the cooking time to ensure that they do not dry out and add more cider if necessary.
7. To finish the sauce, add the flour to the shallots back on a gentle heat and mix together. You may need to add a little more butter at this stage if the shallots are very dry, but they shouldn t be. Now add the cider reduction and the crème fraîche and cook together over a low heat until the sauce starts to thicken.
8. Once ready to serve, slice each breast into about five slices and place on the plate still in the shape of the whole breast. Pour the sauce over the meat and accompany with rvsti potatoes - see separate recipe and baby leeks.

This recipe also works well with whole pheasant. Cover the breasts of the bird with bacon and add the cider half way through the roasting, covering in the same way and it will help keep the bird moist. You can then make the sauce from the cooking juices in the roasting pan along the same lines as above.
or....

http://www.cottagesmallholder.com/?p=186
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
Ooooh you timely buggers you!

Customer's just popped in with a gun over his shoulder and two pheasants. I'll be deboobing them the moment I get home, after I've been to a shop to get some bits - it's seems that the red wine is top of the list.

Thanks!
 
#20
Sausage meat is the thing to put between a pair of pheasant breasts

Anything else is a criminal waste :D

PoGs

www.pocketcomms.com
 
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