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Phantoms from the past.

Awol

LE
Oh they always land. Sometimes wheels down, in the right place, and the people aboard walk away.

Apparently.
I saw something on PBS (I think) last week that said that in the States, something like a half of all air crashes featured the USAF.

I think that’s a good thing (in a general sense, not in individual cases if there are fatalities or injuries, obviously), because it proves that Maverick and his mates are really pushing the envelope.

Very low level over Vegas, at ninety degrees to the ground, has got to be more worthwhile than just practicing interminable circuits at 500ft.
 

tiv

LE
Buccaneer crews would be on 100% oxygen and having nose bleeds if they flew that high.

Buccaneer Low.jpg
 
Oh they always land. Sometimes wheels down, in the right place, and the people aboard walk away.

Apparently.

A25 song

They say in the Air Force a landing's OK
If the pilot gets out and can still walk away,
But in the Fleet Air Arm the prospect is grim
If the landing's piss-poor and the pilot can't swim.
 
Had a bit of a wierd one today, where I was buying some drinks in a German “trinkmarkt” place, and the other customer (social distancing) a woman Made a hasty escape.
I went outside and she was stood at the boot of my car (with a mask on!) I honestly do not recognize her.
She had a bit of my front number plate holder in her hand, that she claimed had caught on her trousers (I am not CSI but unlikely)
I am my normal self and totally nonchalant, saying it an old car and really I do not give a ****, my good car is at home.
She is insistant that she gives me her phone number,(just in case I change my mind!) I say NO??

mistake or Vergangenheit?
Have you been cutting up words and into sticking them lines?
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
A25 song

They say in the Air Force a landing's OK
If the pilot gets out and can still walk away,
But in the Fleet Air Arm the prospect is grim
If the landing's piss-poor and the pilot can't swim.
Reminded of Hero With a Wing (Calvert):
I see myself a hero
While one wings falls away
And the dial approaches zero
In a spiralling display.
My past life flashes feverishly,
And lives I did not lead,
Like the time I was a hero
Of a weird, outlandish breed.
One arm of flesh and muscle
And one of feathered scale
I was hero with one wing
That was of no avail.
I could only fly in circles
Like a corkscrew in the sky,
My one wing flapping frantically
While birds just glided by.
I launched myself from mountains
And from the highest trees
And though I could get nowhere
Just landed on my knees.
But still I was a hero,
With one wing more than most.

Almost half an Angel;
A whirling holy ghost.
My father was an eagle
With two wings wide as sails
My mother was the west wind witch
With grasping finger nails.
She lured him from his aerie
With her twittering device.
She kept him in a golden cage
And fed him field mice.
Editing for mong quoting by the phone, and the phone Edit bar overlaying the Forum Quote icon.
 
Last edited:
Way back when I was a space cadet, dinosaurs ruled the earth and a fabric clad steed called the Chipmunk was the AEF/lead in trainer for the RAF an ex-spitfire pilot used to fly at one of the AEF’s.

He was said to have to occasionally increase altitude to clear the perimeter fence. Other than that I was told a quiet and retiring type.

I also had links with a Sea-Cadet unit - on its establishment was a former RN submarine officer. He shared his retiring nature. These days I wish I had the chance to chat with either of them and something of their experiences.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Bucc used to sit in the "ground effect" and so long as the pilot didn't sneeze it would stabilise.

From wiki 'cos I can't be bothered typing:

When an aircraft flies at or below approximately half the length of the aircraft's wingspan above the ground or water there occurs an often-noticeable ground effect. The result is lower induced drag on the aircraft. This is caused primarily by the ground or water obstructing the creation of wingtip vortices and interrupting downwash behind the wing.[5][6]

A wing generates lift by deflecting the oncoming airmass (relative wind) downward.[7] The deflected or "turned" flow of air creates a resultant force on the wing in the opposite direction (Newton's 3rd law). The resultant force is identified as lift. Flying close to a surface increases air pressure on the lower wing surface, nicknamed the "ram" or "cushion" effect, and thereby improves the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio. The lower/nearer the wing is with regards to the ground, the more pronounced the ground effect becomes. While in the ground effect, the wing requires a lower angle of attack to produce the same amount of lift. In wind tunnel tests in which the angle of attack and airspeed remain constant, an increase in the lift coefficient ensues,[8] which accounts for the "floating" effect. Ground effect also alters thrust versus velocity, where reduced induced drag requires less thrust in order to maintain the same velocity.[8]

Low winged aircraft are more affected by ground effect than high wing aircraft.[9] Due to the change in up-wash, down-wash, and wingtip vortices there may be errors in the airspeed system while in ground effect due to changes in the local pressure at the static source.[8]
 
Bucc used to sit in the "ground effect" and so long as the pilot didn't sneeze it would stabilise.

From wiki 'cos I can't be bothered typing:

When an aircraft flies at or below approximately half the length of the aircraft's wingspan above the ground or water there occurs an often-noticeable ground effect. The result is lower induced drag on the aircraft. This is caused primarily by the ground or water obstructing the creation of wingtip vortices and interrupting downwash behind the wing.[5][6]

A wing generates lift by deflecting the oncoming airmass (relative wind) downward.[7] The deflected or "turned" flow of air creates a resultant force on the wing in the opposite direction (Newton's 3rd law). The resultant force is identified as lift. Flying close to a surface increases air pressure on the lower wing surface, nicknamed the "ram" or "cushion" effect, and thereby improves the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio. The lower/nearer the wing is with regards to the ground, the more pronounced the ground effect becomes. While in the ground effect, the wing requires a lower angle of attack to produce the same amount of lift. In wind tunnel tests in which the angle of attack and airspeed remain constant, an increase in the lift coefficient ensues,[8] which accounts for the "floating" effect. Ground effect also alters thrust versus velocity, where reduced induced drag requires less thrust in order to maintain the same velocity.[8]

Low winged aircraft are more affected by ground effect than high wing aircraft.[9] Due to the change in up-wash, down-wash, and wingtip vortices there may be errors in the airspeed system while in ground effect due to changes in the local pressure at the static source.[8]
Bollocks. Everybody knows that lift is a result of thousands of microscopic things called Bernoullies. Like midges, they prefer to congregate near the ground. That’s what explains ‘ground effect’.
 
Bucc used to sit in the "ground effect" and so long as the pilot didn't sneeze it would stabilise.

From wiki 'cos I can't be bothered typing:

When an aircraft flies at or below approximately half the length of the aircraft's wingspan above the ground or water there occurs an often-noticeable ground effect. The result is lower induced drag on the aircraft. This is caused primarily by the ground or water obstructing the creation of wingtip vortices and interrupting downwash behind the wing.[5][6]

A wing generates lift by deflecting the oncoming airmass (relative wind) downward.[7] The deflected or "turned" flow of air creates a resultant force on the wing in the opposite direction (Newton's 3rd law). The resultant force is identified as lift. Flying close to a surface increases air pressure on the lower wing surface, nicknamed the "ram" or "cushion" effect, and thereby improves the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio. The lower/nearer the wing is with regards to the ground, the more pronounced the ground effect becomes. While in the ground effect, the wing requires a lower angle of attack to produce the same amount of lift. In wind tunnel tests in which the angle of attack and airspeed remain constant, an increase in the lift coefficient ensues,[8] which accounts for the "floating" effect. Ground effect also alters thrust versus velocity, where reduced induced drag requires less thrust in order to maintain the same velocity.[8]

Low winged aircraft are more affected by ground effect than high wing aircraft.[9] Due to the change in up-wash, down-wash, and wingtip vortices there may be errors in the airspeed system while in ground effect due to changes in the local pressure at the static source.[8]
Ground effect you say...

3BEB535A-13F3-4988-8E17-9701BB7F8AD2.jpeg
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I have no comment to make at this time
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Spitfire? What Spitfi...

 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
And those Bucc pilots would be looking down on Lightning jockeys:

1612517995553.png
 
1969 or 1970 I was an air cadet for a short time, so short a time, I never got a uniform.

One of the officers was my neighbour and he used to fly a Tiger Moth above our street some weekends.

One weekend he was taking a group of the senior cadets flying, he told me I had no chance of getting a flight, but if I wanted I could come, so off we went in his Austin Healey and we ended up at RNAS Yeovilton.

Had our lunch in a small cookhouse on the base, then the other cadets disappeared into their Chipmunks and into the sky.

With nothing else to do or look at I had a wander around, there was a hanger or workshop near and it seemed to be just across the road from the cookhouse.
Inside the open doors were three Phantoms, I was immediately struck by how small they actually were.
The place was deserted and I could have done anything but I had enough self-discipline not to fiddle with any big red buttons.

Up against one of the walls was a burst tyre, I could see from the damage that the brakes had been locked up and friction had worn completely through the tyre as it skidded down a runway.

Above the tyre was a notice reporting that the tyre had come off the Phantom used in the Transatlantic Air Race. (May 1969)

 

wildbill99

Swinger
On a visit to RAF Marham in the early 2000s, whilst being shown over a Tornado in one of the hangars, the CO of the squadron we were visiting dragged us outside to watch a last flight of a pilot from another squadron. Tornado goes pretty much right over us between the hangar we had just exited and the next nearest, about the altitude of the Phantom in post #4. Wow, says I, that's quite low. Nah, came the reply from the CO, if that had been one of my boys he'd have been at chest height.
 
Not in that case, it was Sqn Ldr Guy Pearse last flight......well, it was after he landed

No, it wasn't. It was the then Sqn Ldr, later ACM, William Wratten (God rest him, because I hope he is dead, the c**t) on a post-major servicing airframe recovery / transit back to Wattisham.

Doing a beat up of the airfield at St Athan was commonplace as a "TY" for the groundcrew back in the day.
 
No, it wasn't. It was the then Sqn Ldr, later ACM, William Wratten (God rest him, because I hope he is dead, the c**t) on a post-major servicing airframe recovery / transit back to Wattisham.

Doing a beat up of the airfield at St Athan was commonplace as a "TY" for the groundcrew back in the day.
Is that the gentleman affectionately known in commissioned quarters as "Bastard Bill"?
 

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