PFT time cutting

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by JestersDead, Jan 23, 2009.

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  1. Hi

    At the risk of the inevitable fat boy just man up and run comments i need to knock a minute of my pft time in eight weeks and was hoping for some constructive training advice from people.

    Many Thanks
     
  2. this is what i would suggest

    slowly build up your distance, but you need to give 110% on each run. Don't start doin 1 mile and saying your knackered after 1/2 mile you MUST carry on, after a while you get use to it.

    Then try 3 mile, 5 mile and so on.....

    The main thing you need is determination to succeed
     
  3. 8 weeks ahead? Respect for actually giving yourself a chance my friend. To many guys just give themselves 5days to cut that time haha.
     
  4. Tabata sprints. Google it
     
  5. hill sprints and interval training.

    beast it on the hills and do some hard intervals and it will reap wonders.
     
  6. Loads of mileage.Get out and pound the concrete.Look at Runnersworld.co.uk for training programmes and advice from the forums.
     
  7. Whilse out running today I worked out I do 70 to 80 miles a month.
    One or two short runs each week at 3 mile each, in the gym or 'on the road'
    Two longer runs each week at 10 mile each, one 'on the road' and one 'off the road' on the weekend.

    It's workin too i've taken 2 min off my 1.5 mile time in under 6 months :lol:
     
  8. Improve you fitness as above and:

    Learn to pace. Too many people blow themselves to pieces in the first 1/2 mile and spend the remaining mile recovering and getting slower. Get on a running track and run a few laps. A 10:30 PFT time equates to 1:45 per 400m lap of a standard running track (for perspective compare that to Michael Johnson whose 1999 WR stands at 43.16).

    Some/much/all of the PFT is phychological (depending on how your head works and how fit you actually are). Find out where your PFT will be held and run it a few times at your own pace. I find the PFT easier when I know the route well and, as they say; time spent on recce is seldom wasted.

    Make sure you lay off the phys in the couple days before (athletes call this 'tapering') and don't pig out but make sure you have taken on adequate fuel in the form of quality carbs beforehand (try pasta, bread, potatoes the day before, Weetabix a few hours before and a banana with your water about an hour before). Also make sure you are well hydrated at all times in the week before (lay off the booze).

    Conserve your energy. If you're good at press-ups and sit-ups, don't do any more than you need to pass those parts of the test.

    When the time comes, just keep going!
     
  9. 2 X 10 miles per week = 20 miles a week.

    2 X 3 miles per week = 6 miles a week.

    Total - 26 miles a week. (Or 23 miles, if you only do 1 short run that week.)

    Were you being too modest when you said you did 80 miles a month? :)
     
  10. 70 to 80 should be a minimum, plus it allows me to scive off at least one or two runs per month! Whilse my maths may be shocking, my runnings improving :wink:
     
  11. My personal experience has been 1-2 hard 3 milers a week and a interval session (usually 200m sprint, 200m jog, although I have started doing some 400m sprints now and have played with 800m runs).

    I have heard of running at your desired pace for say 800m, resting as much time as needed (to begin with) and then running it again for 3-4 repetitions. Then as time goes by, you reduce the rest until you are running it constantly. It makes sense as you're keeping your pace where it is required and setting your pace to the speed.
     
  12. 8 weeks gives you enough time to lose up to a stone in fat! That'll sure as hell shave a minute off your PFT time.
     
  13. cut every corner you can and have a hidden bike
     
  14. Man up and lose weight fat boy !!

    Well, someone had to say it .....

    No actual advice to give other than well done and keep at it...fatty :twisted:
     
  15. You should find this useful. This was taken from a booklet on fitness preparation for Sandhurst





    Improve from 8 min 30sec to 8 min
    Set 1 1 x 800 metres
    in 2:40
    800 metre jog
    recovery in 5:20
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres
    in 1:20
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 2:40
    Set 3 4 x 200 metres
    in 40
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:20
    Improve from 9 min to 8 min 30 sec
    Set 1 2 x 600 metres in
    2:08
    600 metre jog
    recovery in 4:15
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres in
    1:25
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 2:50
    Set 3 2 x 200 metres
    in 43
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:25
    Improve from 9 min 30 sec to 9 min
    Set 1 3 x 400 metres
    in 1:30
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:00
    Set 2 4 x 200 metres
    in 45
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:30
    Set 3 4 x 100 meters
    in 23
    100 metre jog
    recovery in 45
    Improve from 10 min to 9 min 30 sec
    Set 1 1 x 600 metres
    in 2:23
    600 metre jog
    recovery in 4:45
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres
    in 1:35
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:10
    Set 3 3 x 200 metres
    in 48
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:35
    Set 4 4 x 100 metres
    in 24
    100 metre jog
    recovery in 48
    Improve from 10 min 30 sec to 10 min
    Set 1 1 x 600 metres
    in 2:30
    600 metre jog
    recovery in 4:55
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres
    in 1:40
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:20
    Set 3 2 x 200 metres
    in 50
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:40
    Set 4 3 x 100 metres
    in 25
    100 metre jog
    recovery in 50
    Improve from 11 min to 10 min 30 sec
    Set 1 1 x 600 metres
    in 2:35
    600 metre jog
    recovery in 5:00
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres
    in 1:45
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:30
    Set 3 2 x 200 metres
    in 53
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:45
    Set 4 2 x 100 metres
    in 26
    100 metre jog
    recovery in 53
    Improve from 12 min to 11 min
    Set 1 1x 600 metres
    in 2:50
    600 metre jog
    recovery in 5:30
    Set 2 3 x 400
    metres in 1:53
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:46
    Set 3 2 x 200 metres
    in 1 min
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 2 min
    Set 4 2 x 100 metres
    in 30
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 1 min
    Improve from 13 min to 12 min
    Set 1 4 x 400 metres
    in 2:05
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 4:10
    Set 2 4 x 200 metres
    in 1:03
    200 metre jog
    recovery in 2:06
    Improve from 14 min to 13 min
    Set 1 5 x 400 metres in
    2:10
    400 metre jog
    recovery in 4:20
    Set 2 4 x 100 metres
    in 32
    100 metre jog
    recovery


    INTERVAL TRAINING
    SESSION
    Specific interval training sessions are on page 11 of this booklet. Interval training involves running set distances in specific times, with the running pace dictated by your 1.5 mile run time. It is important that during these sessions you adhere to the time and distance stated during the recovery
    period – do not be tempted to shorten these periods. To decide which interval session is appropriate for you, use your last 1.5 mile run time. For example, if your last run time was 9:50 then the session to improve from
    10 min to 9 min 30 sec is appropriate.
    HOW DO I PERFORM THE SESSION?
    Using the 10 min to 9 min 30sec
    session as an example, you start
    all the sessions with a gentle warm up as per all training. Set one
    involves a run of 600m in 2:23 at
    an even pace, followed immediately by a 600m jog recovery at an even
    pace in 4:45. Set two follows on directly and consists of running
    400m in 1:35 – 400m jog recovery in 3:10 – 400m in 1:35 – 400m jog recovery before moving straight into set three. Again 3 x 200m are performed in 48 seconds, with these efforts being interspersed with 1:35 jog recoveries, before completing set 4 in a similar fashion.

    Do this twice a week and if you wish complement with two 40 min runs at 60-80 % your max heart rate, on different days from the intervals with a one day gap between both.