PFT/PFT Interval Training

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by smff73, Feb 15, 2009.

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  1. Folks,

    I saw a link on a post here a wee while ago that had interval routines to reduce PFT/PFA ( or whatever it is now ) times, with a routine to bring your time below 1030, a separate one for below 0930 and a separate one for below 0803 ( if I can recall correctly ).

    Now I've been searching on here for a while without success, anybody any ideas of where it may be? It may have been Sandhurst related

    Ta
     
  2. Just work out what pace you need to run to make the time, run that pace for (say) a sixth of the distance. Stop, take ten breaths, go again, repeat. Reduce and eliminate the rests. A mile and a half is just over six laps of a track.

    10 minutes 30 seconds is 630 seconds. So (say) 105 seconds a lap. (A mile and a half is just over 2400 so call it 103 seconds).

    To save a minute overall save 10 seconds a lap - 95 second laps equals 930.

    I think. I'd get it right with a calculator :?
     
  3. Cheers Gobby,

    Will get the calculator out!
     
  4. So to get a time to 9.10 what should i be running a lap in?
     
  5. The best pft training advise i've been given was from a pti a few years back. Set yourself a two week period. On day one do the route at jogging pace, warm up and cool down properly of course. Do something else next day, day after do the pft route again but increase your pace, then day off then do it again - and just progress like this until day 11, then have 2 days off and on the last day do the pft route at maximum effort. The theory behind it is muscle memory, and will get your body used to running full pelt for that distance. Useful just before the start of any course you may attend. It should get well over a minute off your current time - at least.
     
  6. 10:30 is 1:45 per lap. Knock 10 secs off per minute of PFT target time (eg, 9:30 is 1:35 per lap etc).

    In case anyone is in need of perspective; Michael Johnson's record is just over 43 secs.

    Pacing is absolutely key. Go and watch a PFT held on a track and time the runners. Most do the first lap far faster than they should and spend the rest of the mile and a half recovering. For example, in a recent PFT pacing trial that I did in training I ran the first lap in 1:30 but only managed an 10:28 overall (my final laps were IRO 1:50); if I'd paced at a precise 1:45 per lap I would have finished in a better condition or, perhaps more importantly, could have finished earlier.
     
  7. On a 400m running track - a pft being a mile and a half which is 2400 meters - you would have to run 6 laps. So for a 9min 10 sec pft each lap would have to be (9.16/6) at a speed of 1 minute and 53 seconds (roughly)
     
  8. Thats like telling a hand grenade to get some perspective on a fecking nuke...
     
  9. About 90 second laps, or just over. Once you know what your absolute best time is pacing yourself at the start makes it so much easier it feels like cheating :) Your best time over such a short distance is going to mean a very high level of effort, though.

    I could never go that much under a minute for 400 - say 55s on a decent track and 58 on cinders, but if you do something like that it makes the pain of slower pace seem much less, and it makes a slower pace seem really manageable. Running an absolute 400 is like opening a door in your head, and once you've got a proper time you can have a realistic go at working out what you should be capable of for 6 laps. There's no real reason why you should be slowing down more than 10 seconds a lap, so my just under 8 minute best effort for a mile and a half was a product of (as Dragstrip says) not being able to ration the effort properly.
     
  10. Improve from 8 min 30sec to 8 min
    Set 1 1 x 800 metres
    in 2:40 800 metre jog
    recovery in 5:20
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres
    in 1:20 400 metre jog
    recovery in 2:40
    Set 3 4 x 200 metres
    in 40 200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:20

    Improve from 9 min to 8 min 30 sec
    Set 1 2 x 600 metres in
    2:08 600 metre jog
    recovery in 4:15
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres in
    1:25 400 metre jog
    recovery in 2:50
    Set 3 2 x 200 metres
    in 43 200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:25

    Improve from 9 min 30 sec to 9 min
    Set 1 3 x 400 metres
    in 1:30 400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:00
    Set 2 4 x 200 metres
    in 45 200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:30
    Set 3 4 x 100 meters
    in 23 100 metre jog
    recovery in 45

    Improve from 10 min to 9 min 30 sec
    Set 1 1 x 600 metres
    in 2:23 600 metre jog
    recovery in 4:45
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres
    in 1:35 400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:10
    Set 3 3 x 200 metres
    in 48 200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:35
    Set 4 4 x 100 metres
    in 24 100 metre jog
    recovery in 48

    Improve from 10 min 30 sec to 10 min
    Set 1 1 x 600 metres
    in 2:30 600 metre jog
    recovery in 4:55
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres
    in 1:40 400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:20
    Set 3 2 x 200 metres
    in 50 200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:40
    Set 4 3 x 100 metres
    in 25 100 metre jog
    recovery in 50

    Improve from 11 min to 10 min 30 sec
    Set 1 1 x 600 metres
    in 2:35 600 metre jog
    recovery in 5:00
    Set 2 2 x 400 metres
    in 1:45 400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:30
    Set 3 2 x 200 metres
    in 53 200 metre jog
    recovery in 1:45
    Set 4 2 x 100 metres
    in 26 100 metre jog
    recovery in 53

    Improve from 12 min to 11 min
    Set 1 1x 600 metres
    in 2:50 600 metre jog
    recovery in 5:30
    Set 2 3 x 400
    metres in 1:53 400 metre jog
    recovery in 3:46
    Set 3 2 x 200 metres
    in 1 min 200 metre jog
    recovery in 2 min
    Set 4 2 x 100 metres
    in 30 200 metre jog
    recovery in 1 min

    Improve from 13 min to 12 min
    Set 1 4 x 400 metres
    in 2:05 400 metre jog
    recovery in 4:10
    Set 2 4 x 200 metres
    in 1:03 200 metre jog
    recovery in 2:06

    Improve from 14 min to 13 min
    Set 1 5 x 400 metres in
    2:10 400 metre jog
    recovery in 4:20
    Set 2 4 x 100 metres
    in 32 100 metre jog
    recovery in 1:05
     
  11. That's the badger FinalRV!

    Where the hell did you find it?
     
  12. Uum, no. 1:53 per lap would give you a PFT of 11:20.

    113x6/60=11.3

    9 mins is 1:30 or 90 secs per lap.

    The answer to the question posed (time per lap for a 9:10 pft) is 1:31.666 secs per lap.
     
  13. Ha, yeah I know. I do find it useful to know what a human is capable of when I'm plodding around at 1 min slower per lap.
     
  14. Absolutely right. In theory, because any fast PFT will by definition be almost entirely aerobic (less the final stretch (which is where short/non-sprint and middle-distance events are won)), if you can do 1 lap at a given pace, you should be able to bang them out over and over as long as your body can continue to cope with fueling your muscles, purging the waste products and you don't get injured; if you can't it's because you've slipped over the anaerobic threshold, probably at the start (ie you've failed to pace properly) or because, young Padawan, in you the Jedi force is weak.

    Note, pacing is very hard; in over a decade of competitive racing, I still stuff it up every time. Mortals like the majority of us are left either blowing up and hanging in there or simply making sure we are fit enough to cruise around without having to.
     
  15. Here you go :)