Peugeot 208 Allure 1.2l 82HP "Engine Fault - Repair Needed."

NSP

LE
I used to repair them after coming off the docks at Bristol.
Time is of the essence and the minimum wage drivers that they employ don't hang about.
I cannot blame them, as the quicker they get the delivery done the more they get paid.
Don't be fooled into thinking that the new car you just shelled out for has been lovingly treated.
My 2009 Clio had 156 on the clock when I collected it but I'd been told it was coming on a red plate (I'd ordered a basic with options and then the salesman called me to say he'd had a buyer pull out post-build, pre-delivery and he had a mid-range Clio in my colour with all my options as standard and few extras I could have for the same money - not surprising as, post-build, the deposit was forfeit so they probably made a bigger profit than they would've on my original buy) so wasn't surprised. The salesman assured me that the delivery driver would observe the run-in speed.

I doubted it.

However, it seems modern engines don't really need the running-in like old ones did...
 

NSP

LE
You do know that 'delivery mileage' can be reset up to ten times (max 50 miles per reset) don't you? Most don't bother as it's usually less than 50 miles but where a stock order car has to be shifted on trade plates, it's not unknown for the route to be via brand dealers for the delivery mileage to be reset several times. Not all mfr's allow this, most Euro ones do though.
Would be a bit odd to collect a car from the dealer and it have next to zero on it, having watched the QA guy put each one off the line on the rolling road in various car factories in my time. If it's got less than 6-8miles on it when you collect a from-factory new car, raise an eyebrow.
 

NSP

LE
Called it in reply #8.

Do I win anything?
Nothing more than smugly knowing you contributed meaningfully to thread that was blissfully devoid of crayoning and idiocy and chock-full of useful information for the not-so-familiar-with-modern-engines sort.

Or something...
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
Not saying it was but dealer transfers are a thing - sometimes on trade plates, sometimes on transporters, sometimes a mix of both. All i'm saying is that delivery mileage is only since the last reset (if any). Anyway, get those spark plug ports dewatered, get the plugs out and check (or send photo's) of where the ceramic enters the metal base, any corrosion or tracking there means new plugs needed, whether due on age/mileage or not.
 

NSP

LE
Not sure how he'd know they are fine if they're still fitted though.
I would presume he fetched them out and had a look - I spun off a page of notes and pics detailing the symptoms experienced and the messing about that I'd done, mentioning/showing the wet in the pockets and dirt deposits and stuff (it wasn't an immersion or pooling, but more of a film and droplets, really) - however, I suspect he might not have bothered with them as girly on the desk pulled up the workfile when I asked if they'd worked it out yet and should I stay or call a taxi, and, reading the techies notes off her monitor, said, "Did you know that packs 1 and 3 had changed places?"

"Yeah, I did - it's in the notes I passed over with the service book that I swapped them out to do the code change test. Last entry: NB! The coil that was on the drivers side of the engine is now on the passenger side and vice versa."

"Oh., yeah - so it does..."

I should have waited until the Polish lass got off the 'phone and asked her instead of dealing with the bloody carrot-cruncher, really. Polish lass actually knew what I was talking about when I checked the thing in at lunchtime.
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
Would be a bit odd to collect a car from the dealer and it have next to zero on it, having watched the QA guy put each one off the line on the rolling road in various car factories in my time. If it's got less than 6-8miles on it when you collect a from-factory new car, raise an eyebrow.
Volvo, all the way from China have <4 miles on them (even though the PDI calls for 5 miles driving as a minimum), JLR often have 1 or 2 miles, even the ones shipped overseas, Ford pre-2018 are resettable, Audi are reset as part of the PDI but VW & SEAT are not, generally quite often they are not reset if pre-registered so it seems as if it's been a demonstrator or used in some way to justify the cut price - just last week I was in a yard full of various marques (inc a LOT of small Toyotas) where the PDI tech's were wandering round with a torque wrench, tyre pressure gauge, laptop & notepad doing the PDI registrations on the ground - i.e. no under vehicle checks or test drive. It shouldn't be done like that but as a contractor, I have no influence to correct it.
 

NSP

LE
£450?!?! ARE YOU ON CRACK?
No, Bostik.

Seriously, despite the extensive valuable information fellow ArRSers have been kind enough to donate to this thread I find myself out of my depth with these modern, gizmo-packed engines. Yesterday, thanks to this thread, the OBD2 reader and a bit of Googling I was fairly confident it was a coil pack issue. However, fairly is not certainly. I'd already booked it in for a check plus service, as the service is up in a couple of weeks anyway, and I have to have it dealer serviced until its seventh year to preserve the corrosion warranty (which I might be needing soon, after recent adventures!) - which is another scam to watch out for; always read the small print! Thus, find out for sure what's fucked up, fix it, service it, stamp the book, see you next year and by then I'll have probably traded it in for a new one anyway, if I keep my SED claim going until April 6th.

£179 of the bill is the service, which I'd have been down for anyway. £99.95 is for them to determine what I already knew but they weren't going to take my word for it (quelle surprise). Looking at the aftermarket parts dealer sites they offer "OEM equivalent" coil packs, which sounds like it's the stuff the manufacturer uses - but isn't. It's "equivalent." The dealer orders up actual OEM stuff (as in, the same parts they put in in the factory). Doesn't mean they're better quality but it doesn't void the warranty.

In my experience the stuff they build the things with is pretty good*, the after-market copies not so much unless you know your way around the brands - which I don't.

I'm okay with paying their over-inflated parts charges this time just to get the thing running again - with a warranty behind the parts and work, just to get me up the learning curve.

I have to say, boys and possibly girls, a big leg-up up that curve has come from the contributors on this thread so if I could take a moment to thank you all, I'd appreciate the indulgence. Thank you!

Now go and pissed; it's Friday!



* Unless you were buying a Luton-built Frontera...
 

NSP

LE
Volvo, all the way from China have <4 miles on them (even though the PDI calls for 5 miles driving as a minimum), JLR often have 1 or 2 miles, even the ones shipped overseas, Ford pre-2018 are resettable, Audi are reset as part of the PDI but VW & SEAT are not, generally quite often they are not reset if pre-registered so it seems as if it's been a demonstrator or used in some way to justify the cut price - just last week I was in a yard full of various marques (inc a LOT of small Toyotas) where the PDI tech's were wandering round with a torque wrench, tyre pressure gauge, laptop & notepad doing the PDI registrations on the ground - i.e. no under vehicle checks or test drive. It shouldn't be done like that but as a contractor, I have no influence to correct it.
I've only ever been in Vauxhall, Nissan and Honda plants - all in the UK - and I stopped doing that in 1998. Do we really trust the Chinese? They were keeping a lid on COVID19 until that doctor of theirs blew the whistle - and he's apparently "disappeared."
 

OneTenner

Old-Salt
Not your engine, but an aftermarket PSA group mod I came across which stopped the inlet duct vibrating at tickover, apparently it got changed everytime the driver smelled woodsmoke....

WP_20180102_001.jpg
 
The dealer that I use is Suzuki and Peugeot and has recently added Kia and MG. But when I bought my Suzuki two and a half years ago I had a look at the Peugeots and a had couple of test runs on each marque .
The clincher for buying the Suzuki was when I asked the manager what was the most reliable he showed me two folders one with a few pages in it and the other about ten times the pages The thin one was the Suzuki faults and recalls the other the Peugeot one
 

NSP

LE
I have to say I've been pretty impressed with my Pug - it's a tidy little unit under the bonnet, seriously goes like hot snot for a 1.2l small hatch, sips at the tank if you drive it properly, nice cockpit, good viz', well laid-out dash - and it got me home on that flooded night I put dashcam pics up on the self-taken thread of after I beasted the hell out of it. I guess I'm just paying for it now - literally! Apart from the fiddly little ventilation controls and the 11m turning circle, I can't say I'd want to shack it off and have my 2009 Clio back - which in the first six months I was doing - "What have I done? I want the Clio back!" Mainly because I was used to th Clio and not the Pug.

Lesson learned: stay on the motorway and cut back through town; don't try to be a shortcutting smart-arse.
 
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NSP

LE
Oh, and on nice new smooth tarmac on the M5 past Gloucester it reports 96mpg for mile after mile after.....shit; it ran out and we're back on the shitty old rough tarmac and we're back to 63mpg.

At a boringly tediously 60mph cruise-control, I hasten to add. Boring until you think about how you're jacking off in the Chancellor's eye, mind. :D
 
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