Pet dogs

Stickface1

Swinger
Is it a realistic possibility to own dogs and also be in the forces, assuming that you were single?

To elaborate, as far as I understand, officers can live anywhere they can afford so I'm not asking about rules on owning dogs in the army provided accommodation, but more about how long you may have to be away for at once during an average week based at home?
As well as that, does anyone know of solutions to provide long term care for dogs while on deployment, for example, temporary foster schemes or even cases of dogs being allowed along, or would they simply have to be given up?
Finally, are there cases of very well trained dogs being allowed in work? As hopefull at this may seem, I can recall seeing non-military dogs in the background of army documentaries who seem to be allowed to sit in an office for the day and I know this is not uncommon in some civvy jobs.
 
Is it a realistic possibility to own dogs and also be in the forces, assuming that you were single?

To elaborate, as far as I understand, officers can live anywhere they can afford so I'm not asking about rules on owning dogs in the army provided accommodation, but more about how long you may have to be away for at once during an average week based at home?
As well as that, does anyone know of solutions to provide long term care for dogs while on deployment, for example, temporary foster schemes or even cases of dogs being allowed along, or would they simply have to be given up?
Finally, are there cases of very well trained dogs being allowed in work? As hopefull at this may seem, I can recall seeing non-military dogs in the background of army documentaries who seem to be allowed to sit in an office for the day and I know this is not uncommon in some civvy jobs.
I've lived in the officers' mess where other officers had dogs. Some were allowed them in the office, some weren't.

You may have to go away, at very short notice for days / weeks / months at a time. I've seen other officers look after the dog, or it goes to kennels.

You can't deploy and take your dog with you.
 
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A commissioned friend of mine is in Warminster. There are so many bloody dogs in the offices that they’ve put up child gates between the rooms to keep them apart .
 
....Finally, are there cases of very well trained dogs being allowed in work? As hopefull at this may seem, I can recall seeing non-military dogs in the background of army documentaries who seem to be allowed to sit in an office for the day and I know this is not uncommon in some civvy jobs.
Depends on the location, garrison policy etc. imx, but I’ve worked in locations which have health and safety statements completed and as long as the dogs are in date on insurance and vaccinations, they’re allowed in many work spaces. They have Registers with cards as well.

As above, many offices have ‘baby gates’ that prevent the dogs leaving the office and is a reminder to those entering, there are dogs in there.

Dogs also allowed in the Messes, albeit not dining areas imx.
 
A commissioned friend of mine is in Warminster. There are so many bloody dogs in the offices that they’ve put up child gates between the rooms to keep them apart .
Whilst at IDB many moons ago we had oodles of them in the Mess. The senior living in Officer a Guards major allowed his (black lab) in the dining room as long as it sat by the door.
However the novelty wore off at the Depot for some of my pals who bought puppies (Labs and a Gordon Highlander bought a Basset Hound which was a strange choice!) the early starts and taking the dogs out for poo stops during training ended up with some nasty accidents.
Great to have, but a real bind if you want to move fast!
 
No problem with dogs on office,however having a python loose in 92 sqn RLC office meant i never went upstairs on fire inspectipns!
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The Gunners approach was simple ,during the BCs course you were issued with a golden retriever and a lumpy shaped wife !
 

Ned_Seagoon

War Hero
As others have said, the decision might not be yours to make depending on your unit/location/role. In my own experience, it was just not practical as a younger, single officer simply because I needed to be able to jump when told to and seldom had the time to find a dog minding solution that (then) could have lasted anything from a few days to six months. Later in life, as a pad with support of an animal loving wife, dog ownership became more feasible but still not without its challenges.
 
A search net result:

 
A mess isn't a decent mess without at least a couple of dogs in it.

Having said that, our Ac/Adjt's barely trained GSD was a real pain in the arse.
 
I've known of a few units where dogs ( read officer's pets ) were more or less on strength as mascots, and tolerated in barracks. Not something that would happen with the lower ranks of course.
 

Stickface1

Swinger
Thanks for all the replies, very helpful and surprising as it doesn't seem as uncommon as I thought. In terms of long term care options, I have many dog-loving family and friends and intend to have well obedient and behaving dogs so this shouldn't be an issue!
PS This will only apply to me on occasions anyhow as I will be a Medical Officer and usually work in hospitals on usual civvy shifts, however, it is good to know that if/ when I am posted to a base or required to be away for long periods of time there are options.
 
A search net result:

I dont think an American site will help him much
 
Quite a few of the young officers at my last unit had dogs, they used to palm them off to other mess members if they got spammed with a short notice tasking.
Im was not a fan of them in the workplace, the dog shit that turned up around the work areas wasnt put there by the junior ranks. Some bark, shed fur and are generally a pain in the arse. You often got officers who were delayed somewhere phoning up asking for their dog to be walked/fed.
If one person makes a complaint about the dog, the dog is generally banned from work.
 

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