persimmon homes yes or no?

#1
Am looking for any experiences good or bad with persimmon homes. We are about to spend a shed load on a new build, but have already seen many negative reviews.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#2
If you're are able to monitor the build, you can correct their errors as the build progresses. At least that way you'll have nobody else to blame for the shambles that they throw-up for the benefit of their customers.
 
#4
A few years ago they featured heavily on BBC Watchdog for poor build quality.
I brought my current house as new build 12 years ago. I visited site every week with friends in the building trade and picked up the site forman with any issues. He hated the sight of me but so far no problems have come up.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#5
I visited site every week with friends in the building trade and picked up the site forman with any issues.
As did my father, resulting in three rebuilds of the chimney stack, and the first-fix plumbing being done twice. The estate in Pickering is still standing so their foundation-work ought to be OK. Ish.
 
#6
I'd rather live in a melon than a ******* persimmon....... much more room.


The last time decent houses were built in this country was the 70's, buy one cheap, when the first time buyer has popped his clogs, insulate to modern standards and upgrade, you'll have a solid house with a garden you could swing a giraffe in, to leave to your great- grandchildren

Newbuilds are built from tofu and quinoa, are more suitable as housing for chickens or rabbits and are unlikely to be still standing when your 30 year mortgage is paid off.

5 years down the line, you'll also find that the house is equipped with shite the builders threw in that the builders merchants couldn't give away, but off-loaded to the builders on the cheap........
 
#7
It's not the Building Company per se, it's the quality of the sub contractors they employ. I bought a Taylor Wimpey house new, 2 years ago. The plumber was a cowboy, put his copper cuttings down the plug holes! Site Manager was told to get it sorted. The rest of the work was pretty good overall. The thing I hate about new builds is the back garden is one big mud pile. Landscaping it all from scratch. Not even finished yet as I had to take a Winter 'break' to desert climes in between.....
 
#8
My other halfs brother is living in one of there houses for about 7 months now and he has sod all good to say about them
Power tripping out for no apprent reason cracks in walls even non load bearing ones siting on his up stairs shiter the other day I could hear next door talking sod that for a laugh.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#9
Small gardens, paper-thin walls, poor finish (e.g. single coat of paint), insufficient parking, crammed in with identikit houses - pretty typical of new builds. Buy an older house and tart it up a bit.
 
#10
I've just bought a new build and whilst house hunting, looked at Persimmons, Bloor and Charles Church.

The latter two of the three were streets ahead in terms of build quality, finish and astonishingly, price.

Unfortunately, Persimmons have just bought out Charles Church, so expect any future developments to be of the same standard.
 
#11
Small gardens, paper-thin walls, poor finish (e.g. single coat of paint), insufficient parking, crammed in with identikit houses - pretty typical of new builds. Buy an older house and tart it up a bit.
I've got a new build townhouse over 4 floors (including a 30' long basement) and it's a fairly large, well built dwelling.

The only downside is having poor people entering my courtyard just to be nosey.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
I looked at one before I bought my current home. The walls were so thin they flexed when leant on, the gaps between the frames and the doors were uneven, the kitchen was shoddy.

I ended up buying a 1935 build that, although it needed work, was solid.
 
#13
Agree with all the comments re older houses made by smug twats like me that live in one (130 years old with 2ft 6 thick sandstone walls )
However- If your budget and location demand that you need to buy a new build then all you can do is get a good survey and make sure you get a good guarantee backed by one of the building trade standards so if the company go bust you still get work done.
Any building post 70's will be fairly crap quality wise .....
 
#15
Agree with all the comments re older houses made by smug twats like me that live in one (130 years old with 2ft 6 thick sandstone walls )
However- If your budget and location demand that you need to buy a new build then all you can do is get a good survey and make sure you get a good guarantee backed by one of the building trade standards so if the company go bust you still get work done.
Any building post 70's will be fairly crap quality wise .....

Don't talk to me about 2ft 6" sandstone walls...... our cathedral in Durham has always got scaffolding up somewhere, permanently.

And the sodding builders couldn't care less....... they went bust 900years ago.



Bloody cowboys.
 
#16
It's ten years since I was a subby in new build housing.

'Persimmon' who also have a number of well known names they can trade as, and are no different to most of their rivals. They are the overall Manager of the site, everything else from digging the foundations, to the last tile or carpet is subbed out.

There's a good chance most will have been screwed down to a minimal price to win the contract. It's the minimum they can get away with. The same goes for their rivals again.

Negotiate on the fact that they will attend to the faults initially, but will rapidly lose interest after about 3-6 months.
 
#17
Unless it was built by a family-member, as the show-house on an exclusive plot of executive homes, and you paid trade-price for it.
As much as anything it is the modern building regs and methods that are the problem -
Our house is old with a newer extension built 14 years ago ...... guess which part has cracks in the dry weather.
The old part is sandstone walls , lime cement , lath and plaster ceilings with horse hair and the walls again have a lime cement render again with a liberal dose of horse hair .... it all is flexible and can move with the building.
Newer part again built to a high spec by a very good builder has plaster board ceilings , sandstone and brick cavity walls, footings about 1.5 m deep etc ( old part footings less than 3ft and not concrete ) gets the usual cracks and hairline marks as the building expands and contracts with the seasons and moisture , our old farmhouse was 600+ years old and was built with the oak frame and walls on three courses of bricks and a heavy flagstone roof, not a bit of mastic or expanding foam was need to keep it together when they built it.....
 
#18
Persimmon have been around for a while. However, much like the Curate's egg, they're good in parts: that is, it depends where and who is actually building the houses.

Personally, I'd stay away from the bigger development sites: the original site and development plans never survive first contact with reality. Communal and recreational facilities never appear or are watered down to the extent that what appears is usually far too small to support the communities that they serve.

Build quality will vary considerably: contractors will be subbied down to the power of 10-always get an independent check of electricals, etc.

I would suggest that, if it must be a new build, go for a smaller and regional developer. The site will be much smaller and-hopefully-individual plots that little bit bigger. Build quality is invariably much better also.

I have 2 properties: 1 is 8 years old (the one I live in) and the other 13 years old, which is out to rent. The developments were 16 and 6 plots respectively. Can't really fault either, other than small niggles: each is a good, solid house fitted out to a reasonable standard with decent fixtures and fittings.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
99% of new builds are shit compared even to 80's houses. walls aren't plastered nor even walls in most cases, floors cant be taken up for access and all the timber is mdf. corners wont be, walls might be plumb of you're lucky and every room will be around two foot too small or the ceilings too low for proper wardrobes.

pull up the turf and the soil will be non existent as they strip the good soil and sell it leaving you with clay and rubble to try and turn into a garden.

it doesn't matter who builds them they all aim for a 60% profit margin. uk housing needs a downward adjustment of around 30% instead of the new bubble the chancellor is insisting on creating before the old one had finished deflating.
 

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