People buy new build housing shock: No local facilities!

MrBane

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#1
Living on a new-build - stranded without a car

An article talking about the plight of people in new build houses who struggle to get a pint of milk or a bus because there's no nearby amenities.

Now, first of all I can see that:

1. Maybe they bought the new build as the developer said there would be local shops and facilities further down the line which never materialised

2. Local facilities and shops should be part of a new build and guaranteed but that's hard to do when you're talking about private business.

But... The question for me is where's the Do Your Own Research?

When buying a house, did these people look at a map and do the maths? Did they try a journey from their soon to be Point A to whatever Point B is?

It's like people who inadvertently buy into a shithole. Did they used any government tools available online which would have given steps for a hint that it was a dive, such as the Index for Multiple Deprivations?

It just gets to me that people seem to complain about something they should have (lies and planning blocks not permitting) calculated into their purchase.

Thoughts? Should new builds over 'x' properties be forced to have at the very least a community centre for example? As the builds push further into our greenbelt and further away from our central hubs, what will the outcome be?
 
#2
As a Customs investigator, I did shed loads of surveillance all around our glorious metropolis. Together with colleagues "helpful advice", I had a pretty comprehensive knowledge of where I didn't want to move to and a microscopic list of where I wanted and what I could afford. Didn't do too badly in the end-the mantra has to be location, location, location!
 
#3
Looking at the new builds a mile down the road from me. Smaller houses, lesser build quality, smaller land footprint, no local shops and £66,000 more than my house built in the 30's. A bargain they are.
 
#4
Thoughts? Should new builds over 'x' properties be forced to have at the very least a community centre for example? As the builds push further into our greenbelt and further away from our central hubs, what will the outcome be?
Nope because they will only add it to the price of the houses.

The people interviewed sound like a right incapable spastics.

From the article
Their nearest bus stop is a 15 to 20-minute walk away and the nearest shop is at least a mile away.

First world problems and all that.
 

MrBane

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#5
As a Customs investigator, I did shed loads of surveillance all around our glorious metropolis. Together with colleagues "helpful advice", I had a pretty comprehensive knowledge of where I didn't want to move to and a microscopic list of where I wanted and what I could afford. Didn't do too badly in the end-the mantra has to be location, location, location!
Yip, I just feel people are so desperate to buy that they rush into things without really looking. Like for example, has the developer included the mandatory quota of social housing in your particular part of the development or is it at the end of the build which could be a year or more away? Because if it is, beware - your expensive new house will drop a quarter of its value once they're up.

I just wonder where they will draw the line in terms of expansion of housing and no mandatory requirement for the basics such as a GP, dentist, community centre, a shop, etc.
 

MrBane

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#6
Nope because they will only add it to the price of the houses.

The people interviewed sound like a right incapable spastics.

From the article
Their nearest bus stop is a 15 to 20-minute walk away and the nearest shop is at least a mile away.

First world problems and all that.
This, this, ******* this. I used to walk a mile a day to get the bus, now there are stops in built up areas every couple of hundred metres which slows the journey down and clogs the roads. Get these cnuts walking for public transport and it'll simultaneously combat some of the obesity issues we've got.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#7
Nope because they will only add it to the price of the houses.

The people interviewed sound like a right incapable spastics.

From the article
Their nearest bus stop is a 15 to 20-minute walk away and the nearest shop is at least a mile away.

First world problems and all that.
My nearest shop is a Sainsbury superstore, less than a mile away, but in order to get exercise, I walk the long way, about three miles round.
 
#8
Many gullible people buy off plan. This works well until you find the list of issues with the property:

'My £325,000 home is uninhabitable after less than a year'
Homeowner finds 140 problems with his new £580,000 Taylor Wimpey home | Daily Mail Online
'Our new Bovis home is falling apart and our warranty is worthless'

Apologies for the Daily Wail link but it's relevant to the story.

And this:

Why are Britain’s new homes built so badly?

Our local town has seen over 700 houses thrown (and I mean thrown) up by Barratt, Taylor Wimpey, David Wilson Homes and Morris Homes. Having watched them built, they are utterly sh!te. They are cheap nasty timber frame with a single brick skin and in some cases just a layer of tiles over the top floor.

And yet there is a seemingly endless supply of gullible people queueing up to buy at inflated prices.
 
#9
This type of thing has been happening here in Canada for over 30 years. Public transit does not catch up to development until at least 5-10 years after subdivisions are built. It is a given that you have to drive to survive in the new outer rim housing divisions. It’s not up to local government or developers to provide shops and services, they appear as long as the community can make them financially viable. Over here people have enough common sense to know not to sink all their savings into a new property if they have no means to get about, and they don’t complain because they are happy to not be stuck in some flat in cities that are getting ever more populated.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
New builds are almost always shite.

Having made an offer on one recently, I had a lucky escape, having been in touch with a few people behind the scenes.

I do have a certain amount of sympathy with young people who are looking to get onto the property ladder, but unless they have an overriding reason to move far away from their local area, they would be much better advised to start off with a well maintained older property.

(I'm currently going through an unpleasant house move so I may be biased ....)
 
#11
My gripe with these new build 'villages' is the lack of infrastructure expansion to cope with the rise in local population.

Thousands of shoeboxes thrown up in short order, but no extra schools, doctors or dental surgeries.

No reservoirs built to store water to meet increased demand, nor sewage treatment plants to deal with the turds.

There's no profit in all that dull stuff, though.
 
#12
Yup.
My mortgage bill is now under £400 a month. House built in 1870 ,solid stone.
New build further up the valley going for a minimum of 180K for a 2 bedroom.
I have a shitload of equity in my gaff.
 
#13
I work in a lot of new builds and they just do not seem as solid as old prewar houses. They seem to be getting smaller and smaller and have no storage space. When I see a company has used copper coated steel for telecomms wiring I know you are onto a loser.
 
#14
Some people are just plain stupid and/or ignorant. I can cite the example of at least one new development which is on land next to a river which during the last serious bout of flooding was doing a remarkably good impression of a lake. Stand by for tales of woe and footage of a ground floor decorated in hint of sludge during the next bout of winter storms.
Better yet are the complete knobbers who bought a brand new house which had been built next to a long existing house that just happened to have a large tree in the garden. The new occupants then had the gall to ask the neighbours if they could cut the tree down as it was affecting the amount of daylight they got. I’m guessing that a thirty foot high oak tree overshadowing the garden wasn’t apparent during the viewing.
 

rampant

LE
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#15
Familiar topic

https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/t...ers-building-the-wrong-type-of-houses.241706/

UK New builds are the smallest in Europe, shockingly so, we build matchboxes for hippos basically. The majority of new housing is also balloon-framing - hollow frame builds from prefab panels - its cheap and quick and that's why they like it. The mark up on a 4-5 bed is much greater than a 2-3, and for not much more square footage.

There you have it, it's about developers trying to coin it.

Having done recent work for several large firms in this area - I would not touch a new build with yours. Coming from my boat background, I would reject 70% of the wood used straight off, it's not fit for purpose. I would only consider a new build from a company like Huff Haus, or one of their Scandinavian equivalents. Alternatively I would build my own.

My recommendation if you want something new - buy a plot of land and phone Germany:

http://www.huf-haus.com/en/home.html

They have a UK team now:

http://www.huf-haus.com/en/england/london/welcome.html

Alternatively - prewar or proper Oak Framed
Also from the above thread

Why are houses in Britain so small?

A life lived in tiny flats
 
Last edited:

MrBane

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#16
Familiar topic

https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/t...ers-building-the-wrong-type-of-houses.241706/

QUOTE="rampant, post: 6622713, member: 45353"]UK New builds are the smallest in Europe, shockingly so, we build matchboxes for hippos basically. The majority of new housing is also balloon-framing - hollow frame builds from prefab panels - its cheap and quick and that's why they like it. The mark up on a 4-5 bed is much greater than a 2-3, and for not much more square footage.

There you have it, it's about developers trying to coin it.

Having done recent work for several large firms in this area - I would not touch a new build with yours. Coming from my boat background, I would reject 70% of the wood used straight off, it's not fit for purpose. I would only consider a new build from a company like Huff Haus, or one of their Scandinavian equivalents. Alternatively I would build my own.

My recommendation if you want something new - buy a plot of land and phone Germany:

http://www.huf-haus.com/en/home.html

They have a UK team now:

http://www.huf-haus.com/en/england/london/welcome.html

Alternatively - prewar or proper Oak Framed
Also from the above thread

Why are houses in Britain so small?

A life lived in tiny flats[/QUOTE]

I've seen Huf Haus before, they look great but as I mentioned in another thread, the issue is trying to find land to buy. A lot of the time, the only options available do not in any way shape or form, suit a family; often it's even further out from the central hub of facilities and amenities than a new build estate. With that, comes isolation for the children - regardless how much time the parents are willing to spend on taxing them around.

We definitely need minimum standards for sizes, and it needs to be relevant to the current day. The standards mention, the Parker Morris standard is obviously not fit for purpose anymore. I recently visited a friend in their new Cala home, around £625 for a five bedroom. First thing I noticed was a complete lack of cupboards. None in the kitchen-come-diner, one small one in the hall, none upstairs. WTF.

Add to that the fact you could shake your neighbours hand from the stair window to their stair window.

This is why I wish I'd bought shares in companies like Cala, etc, rather than going for oil because **** me - it just keeps going up and up!
 
#17
We definitely need minimum standards for sizes, and it needs to be relevant to the current day.
No we don't, all that will do is make the price go up, if people want to live in a rabbit hutch, let them.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#18
No we don't, all that will do is make the price go up, if people want to live in a rabbit hutch, let them.
The main driver of costs is land, not the build. Planning laws severely restrict build locations, driving up the price. Hence the recent calls to allow building in the greenbelt
 
#19
The main driver of costs is land, not the build. Planning laws severely restrict build locations, driving up the price. Hence the recent calls to allow building in the greenbelt
The main driver of price is people throwing money around because they are to lazy and/or stupid to look for cheaper.
 

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