Pension and Lung Cancer

#1
This is part of an email from an insurance info site I subscribe to.

The woman's husband, who was a retired army serviceman had spent his whole life serving his country and had a generous retirement pension.
But, because he was diagnosed with lung cancer, she was not entitled to his pension when he died.
She later found out that had he been diagnosed with throat cancer, she would have been entitled to his entire
pension.

Can anyone shed any light on the circumstances?
 
#2
Smoker by any chance? If so he was a self-harming mong and shouldn't get a penny.
 
#3
Sounds bollocks.
 
#4
How did he spend his whole life serving? You can't join the forces until at least 16 years of age.

I was under the impression that the widow was entitled to half the pension should her other half bail out.
 
#5
Smoker by any chance? If so he was a self-harming mong and shouldn't get a penny.
He was a smoker but smokers also get throat cancer. The Docs did say that it was proably throat cancer that went to the lungs but because no-one knew the implications no autopsy was done to prove this and the evidence was cremated.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#6
He was a smoker but smokers also get throat cancer. The Docs did say that it was proably throat cancer that went to the lungs but because no-one knew the implications no autopsy was done to prove this and the evidence was cremated.
There would have been a post mortem


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#9
That would mean only politicians would ever get a pension.
 
#10
Are we getting mixed up between pensions and life insurance policies? It seems a bit odd that the original enquiry about a 'pension' was on an 'insurance' website.

I do not believe that a 'cause of death' would have any effect on the full the payment of a widow's pension. However, a life insurance policy could well have such a clause, particularly if the premiums paid included a discount as a 'non-smoker'.
 
#11
Let's just forfeit everyone's pension unless they can prove without a shadow of a doubt that they do everything they possibly can to live to a ripe old age.

He's earn't his pension and paid his NI contributions.
I've lived to a ripe old age and I've smoked since I was 13, I'll be dead soon, so the tenner I owe you is in the post :)
 
#12
There would have been a post mortem
Yes, but it was the lung cancer that killed him and that's what went in the 'cause of death' tick-box. When the Army Pensions people became involved it was too late to go back and discover the primary cause 'cos he'd been smoked.

I understand where this is being called nonsense etc, I'm also sceptic. However, if and/or when it turns out to be true it needs to be made widespread knowledge to all pensioners and their kin that the cause of death, as noted in the tick-box, can have costly implications. Don't destroy the evidence!

I was hoping for some input from someone that knows the score.... keep the sarcasm and snide and puns coming, that's AARSE because in amongst it there is some very knowledgable information.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#13
Yes, but it was the lung cancer that killed him and that's what went in the 'cause of death' tick-box. When the Army Pensions people became involved it was too late to go back and discover the primary cause 'cos he'd been smoked.

I understand where this is being called nonsense etc, I'm also sceptic. However, if and/or when it turns out to be true it needs to be made widespread knowledge to all pensioners and their kin that the cause of death, as noted in the tick-box, can have costly implications. Don't destroy the evidence!

I was hoping for some input from someone that knows the score.... keep the sarcasm and snide and puns coming, that's AARSE because in amongst it there is some very knowledgable information.
Reckon he'd have had a post mortem to get a cause of death.


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oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#14
This is part of an email from an insurance info site I subscribe to.

The woman's husband, who was a retired army serviceman had spent his whole life serving his country and had a generous retirement pension.
But, because he was diagnosed with lung cancer, she was not entitled to his pension when he died.
She later found out that had he been diagnosed with throat cancer, she would have been entitled to his entire
pension.

Can anyone shed any light on the circumstances?
I agree with Dingerr.
Cause of death has no impact on whether she would receive a pension plus it wouldn't be his 'entire' pension it would be a half or a third of his pension.
or
Is she talking about a War Pension?
 
#15
Are we getting mixed up between pensions and life insurance policies? It seems a bit odd that the original enquiry about a 'pension' was on an 'insurance' website.

I do not believe that a 'cause of death' would have any effect on the full the payment of a widow's pension. However, a life insurance policy could well have such a clause, particularly if the premiums paid included a discount as a 'non-smoker'.
No mix up. it was his army pension.

The insurance info site is not trying to sell insurance but to inform on what is available and what you can insure for and why. If I knew that under certain circumstances her indoors wouldn't get half my pension, I would make other provision and I think a lot of other pensioners would also. We need to know from the hearses mouth, as t'wer.
 
L

lumpy2

Guest
#16
Following on from Jarrod's post - as I understand it, post mortems are not normally performed unless the cause of death is sudden and the deceased is not under the care of a doctor/consultant for any known illness. I should imagine in this case it was already known that the deceased was terminally ill with cancer.

When my grandfather died aged 96 a post mortem was performed and ascertained that he had died from pancreatic cancer. However, he had never had any symptoms until a couple of days before he died, and had not seen a doctor for over a decade!
 
#17
Reckon he'd have had a post mortem to get a cause of death.


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Don't think so. If the doctor attending the deceased was treating the patient was in a position to certificate the death as being as the result of the illness or associated symptoms for which his patient was being treated. A PM would not be necessary unless cause of death was not certain.

In any case, this is largely irrelevant. As far as I know, cause of death would not affect the payment of a widow's pension in any case. If you think about it, pension providers would happily see everyone smoke themselves to death or throw themselves off cliffs as early as possible, as this would proportionately reduce the lifetime pension liability. The widow's residual proportion is generally 50% of the full pension so would immediately represent a 50% reduction in liability.

The worst thing for any pension provider is a pensioner living to a great old age.
 
#18
Reckon he'd have had a post mortem to get a cause of death.
As it says in my quote that you posted, the cause of death was lung cancer. If it could have been proved that the cause of the lung cancer was initially throat cancer that had spread, the widow would be getting the pension.

Conjecture is no substitute for facts and someone must know. I'll bide a wee while....
 
#19
It's bollocks, the only differentiation the Army makes is if death is attributable or non-attributable. Even if non-attributable a widow still receives 50%.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#20
As it says in my quote that you posted, the cause of death was lung cancer. If it could have been proved that the cause of the lung cancer was initially throat cancer that had spread, the widow would be getting the pension.

Conjecture is no substitute for facts and someone must know. I'll bide a wee while....
If the cause was uncertain there would be a PM I'd have thought.


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