Peaky Blinders; blinding show but get the military stuff right

Great TV show but I wish they'd researched the military background better as it's the key backstory of the film.

Warwickshire Yeomen deployed as tunnellers?

Knocking off a field marshal?

Chief Inspector commissioned as a Major?

Chief Inspectors confused with Chief Constables?

Saluting Sarn't Majors?

RA man singing "Boys of Old Brigade" (not written until the 70s by same bloke who wrote "Men behind the Wire")

Anybody pick anything else up?

I have really enjoyed watching the show and it parallels a bit with my own family history as my great grand father ran pubs close to Haydock Park race track during the same period and he was a bit of a scallywag and a real hard case by all accounts.

However, how difficult would it have been for them to get the back story of the Great War correct?


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Yeah, loads of research needed. Like, how to spell the name of the programme correctly, perhaps?
 
Well done that man.
Now, back to the programme.
Nope, never watched it.
 
Yes. Mainly that it's a drama series loosely based on a true story about some Brummie gangsters in the late 19-teens/early 1920s, not an episode of the World at War.

I'm afraid 'loosely' is the word. The Peaky Blinders were extant during the latter part of the 19th century and perhaps the very early part of the 20th. They were not so much a single gang as a criminal youth sub-culture that was present in Birmingham at the time - in the same way that Teddy Boys in a later period were not a particular gang. They had disappeared from the scene by the time that the television version portrays.

As far as I am aware no such person as Tommy Shelby ever existed.

In the first series, a 'cockney' gangster called Billy Kimber was dispatched by the Peaky Blinders. In reality, Billy Kimber was a Birmingham lad and the head of the Brummagem Boys, a local racecourse gang who operated in the West Midlands and also the north of England as well as the south of England, where they formed alliances with local gangs such as the Elephant and Castle Boys (a much later manifestation of which included the young Richardson brothers, Frankie Fraser etc.) in opposition to the Sabinis and the Jewish gangs.

Billy Kimber was eventually badly beaten and shot (not fatally) by the Anglo-Italian Sabini gang from Clerkenwell in an arranged meet in London.

I think he later went to the States where he was a minder for local mobs. As I recall, he just disappeared from the scene and it is uncertain what happened to him.

I'm all for dramatic licence, but why completely turn fact upside down when the factual version is even more interesting?
 
Not military, but one of the female characters referring to, "...the elephant in the room". Yeah, very 1920s.

The researcher/script adviser must have been a fifteen year old on work experience.
Yea, just remembered that they included prohibition in Canada, which never happened.it would be easy to get things right without buggering up artistic license.


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It's like a very silly version of When The Boat Comes In.

I enjoyed that as well but I was always waiting for Terry and Thelma to make an appearance.

It just strikes me as a shame that they couldn't get the easy bits of research right as I've always found that period of history fascinating.

There was a fascinating story/ family legend that a group of Irish Lancashire publicans took over a Fleetwood Trawler business with the intent of smuggling guns into Ireland.

Apparently they rv'd a German UBoat in the Irish Sea and it was sinking so they landed the guns and towed the sub into Fleetwood Harbour and were awarded medals for "capturing" the sub.

I've never been able to find newspaper verification of this incident but have been told it as "fact" by two or three credible sources.

However, that would make a great screenplay.


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S2 is good...I paticularly like the way 'Brum bruv Arfer' is developing...skinny/wiry/psycotic fighting machine..getting hooked on columbian marching powder and doing all the bints from behind..'Fooking' what's not to like...shame he missed out on being a Para..ideal material
 
Yea, just remembered that they included prohibition in Canada, which never happened.it would be easy to get things right without buggering up artistic license.


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Actually it did. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prohibition_in_Canada
We did figure out that it wasn't going to work a bit quicker than the Yanks did though, and happily supplied them for the next decade or so, the Red Duster being something that the USCG didn't really care to disdain out side of their territorial waters.
 
Never seen the program but Sadlers brewery in Lye make a very nice dark ale called Peaky Blinder, 4.7% ABV in the style of a black IPA.
 
Actually it did. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prohibition_in_Canada
We did figure out that it wasn't going to work a bit quicker than the Yanks did though, and happily supplied them for the next decade or so, the Red Duster being something that the USCG didn't really care to disdain out side of their territorial waters.

Every day's a school day.

Interesting that Quebec repealed the legislation almost at once.



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