Army Rumour Service

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

PCS Thermal Jacket “Softie”

Just out of interest, does anyone recall in the 1970's you couldn't really find really warm coats in regular shops? When I was at school, everyone was wearing knockoffs of the USAF green/orange parka with the revolting fur trim on the hood. The first really warm jacket I got was an IDF "Dubon" that I bought there on a visit.
It was always a Jack Hawkins North Atlantic Convoy knock-off Duffle Coat with the wooden peg buttons and matching bank robber syle balaclava, plus the 'don't tell him Pike scarf, in the sixties when I was a lad. All that was missing was the the cup of cocoa. What let the ensemble down in terms of warmth though was the frozen knee caps due to having to wear shorts until we started at secondary school.
 
Last edited:

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Just out of interest, does anyone recall in the 1970's you couldn't really find really warm coats in regular shops? When I was at school, everyone was wearing knockoffs of the USAF green/orange parka with the revolting fur trim on the hood. The first really warm jacket I got was an IDF "Dubon" that I bought there on a visit.
Never had one - hated them though, I much preferred my surplus Bundeswehr parka with the button-in winter lining..... even if it wasn't completely waterproof.
I think even then I had an aversion to all things American (except the space programme)
And no, I wasn't a Mod!
 
It was always a Jack Hawkins North Atlantic Convoy knock-off Duffle Coat with the wooden peg buttons and matching bank rober syle balaclava, plus the 'don't tell him Pike scarf, in the sixties when I was a lad. All that was missing was the the cup of cocoa. What let the ensemble down in terms of warmth though was the frozen knee caps due to having to shorts until we started at secondary school.

I suppose the insistence on having inadequate winter clothing stemmed from some perceived need for a stiff upper lip attitude. In the meantime the septics had down vests and jackets. The Septics issued quilted liners and jackets while Brits had woolly-pullies.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
What let the ensemble down in terms of warmth though was the frozen knee caps due to having to wear shorts until we started at secondary school.
Clearly a southern softie! had the same with the shorts-to-longs except most kids wanted to wear shorts - it was the Kingdom of Yorkshire where the weather was to be enjoyed, not tolerated ;)
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I suppose the insistence on having inadequate winter clothing stemmed from some perceived need for a stiff upper lip attitude. In the meantime the septics had down vests and jackets. The Septics issued quilted liners and jackets while Brits had woolly-pullies.
Odd really given their (the yanks) clothing Inadequacies in the winter of 1944 - maybe that's what drove it?

ETA- Wool is a better material when wet, the Lanolin stops the moisture from soaking in to the fibres, down on the other hand, is useless when wet. It's heavy, holds water and a right bugger to dry out. On balance, although down sounds better, i'd prefer a woolly pully.
 
Last edited:
I much preferred my surplus Bundeswehr parka with the button-in winter lining..... even if it wasn't completely waterpro
Beloved of left wing demonstraters everywhere on their marches and demos. Ban the bomb, swampy and his mates, anti Maggi marches, free Nelson Mandela, the surplus Bundeswehr parka seemed to be worn by lefties everywhere. In fact far more than the actual Bundeswehr itself. I often wondered what the attraction was as a chic leftie item considering that until the end of the seventies there were a number of former Wehrmacht and Waffen SS soldiers serving in the Bundeswehr. Five hundred former Waffen SS soldiers joined it when it was first formed in 1956.
 
Odd really given their (the yanks) clothing Inadequacies in the winter of 1944 - maybe that's what drove it?

Officially their kit was pretty good in 1944, as their M1943 combat jackets, liners and boots had recently been introduced. By no means all their troops had actually been issued these by the winter of 1944/45 though, and some troops hadn't even been issued them by the end of the war in Europe.
 
Odd really given their (the yanks) clothing Inadequacies in the winter of 1944 - maybe that's what drove it?

Well yes. In the same way the IDF Dubon was introduced after the Yom Kippur war, which was fought in the winter on the Syrian front. It was a great piece of kit in the day and saved my life while I was in but would be totally amateur nowadays. The hood had special apertures that were supposed to allow hearing while the hood was being worn. No storm collar though and not waterproof. Judging from photographs from the Falklands, the Argies procured them or copied them for issue to their squaddies.
 
Clearly a southern softie! had the same with the shorts-to-longs except most kids wanted to wear shorts - it was the Kingdom of Yorkshire where the weather was to be enjoyed, not tolerated ;)
It was in Stoke-On-Trent but you are all a bit strange in Yorkshire. Probably too tight to pay for the extra material needed for long trousers.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
Impressed by this one, simple, war,. packs small.

The chest pocket & rainhood on the PCS look handy though
 
Never had one - hated them though, I much preferred my surplus Bundeswehr parka with the button-in winter lining..... even if it wasn't completely waterproof.
I think even then I had an aversion to all things American (except the space programme)
And no, I wasn't a Mod!

I remember my troop commander telling me that he didn't mind what we wore, as long as it had a NATO stock number. Curiously, he didn't think I should wear my Bundeswehr parka on the next exercise though.....
 
Officially their kit was pretty good in 1944, as their M1943 combat jackets, liners and boots had recently been introduced. By no means all their troops had actually been issued these by the winter of 1944/45 though, and some troops hadn't even been issued them by the end of the war in Europe.
These chaps had no complaints over the quality and warmth of US Army combat clothing. They quite liked their rations and cigarettes too.

7df670842f15b51471b592f5dcbc982f.jpg
 
Last edited:
Odd really given their (the yanks) clothing Inadequacies in the winter of 1944 - maybe that's what drove it?

ETA- Wool is a better material when wet, the Lanolin stops the moisture from soaking in to the fibres, down on the other hand, is useless when wet. It's heavy, holds water and a right bugger to dry out. On balance, although down sounds better, i'd prefer a woolly pully.

I've tried both. Wools and knits just don't do it for me, also because I find them itchy.
Nowadays they make synthetic down which doesn't lose all its insulating properties when wet.
When my son was in I got him merino baselayers, because of the flammability/melting risk with synthetic materials. He found the merino vests amazingly warm and comfortable as well as handy in the field because they take quite a while before they become smelly.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Odd really given their (the yanks) clothing Inadequacies in the winter of 1944 - maybe that's what drove it?
Impressed by this one, simple, war,. packs small.

The chest pocket & rainhood on the PCS look handy though
I've got a Keela Coat, very good bit of kit. not a drop of water has got through it in twelve years.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I've tried both. Wools and knits just don't do it for me, also because I find them itchy.
Nowadays they make synthetic down which doesn't lose all its insulating properties when wet.
When my son was in I got him merino baselayers, because of the flammability/melting risk with synthetic materials. He found the merino vests amazingly warm and comfortable as well as handy in the field because they take quite a while before they become smelly.
Agree with the Merino stuff, great for when there isn't the opportunity for 'personal admin' and warm without being clammy - even in high temperature variation environments.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I've tried both. Wools and knits just don't do it for me, also because I find them itchy.
I've got a couple of wool outer shirts similar to this
1601149213237.png

They're fire resistant, warm -and reasonably water repellant. I would want an intermediate layer or two though, even though the fibres are less harsh than the issue woolly pully
 
Agree with the Merino stuff, great for when there isn't the opportunity for 'personal admin' and warm without being clammy - even in high temperature variation environments.
Spot on, Aldi do merino tops a couple of times a year and they're top notch.
Half zip long sleeved for about £20- that was last years price but I doubt they'll have changed much.
 
I find the best thing for keeping warm and dry is not going out when it is cold and wet. But then again I have been retired for the last five years so if it is howling or chucking it down, I can just stay in bed, or just sit there banging the mong buttons on arrse with the central heating on and a hot brew at my side.
 

Latest Threads

Top