• This is a stand-to for an incoming competition, one of our most expensive yet.
    Later this week we're going to be offering the opportunity to Win £270 Rab Neutrino Pro military down jacket
    Visit the thread at that link above and Watch it to be notified as soon as the competition goes live

Patriotism is back.

#1
The pendulum is starting to swing back. Despite the government's best efforts.

After the years of being embarrassed about our past, people want to sing Land of Hope and Glory
By Alice Thomson
(Filed: 27/07/2005)

This week, in a West London swimming pool, I watched as two large West African women plunged into the water topless in their knickers. No one commented until one woman said: "They look like they're having fun." It was only when they went into the cafe afterwards and one lit a cigarette in a no-smoking zone that someone complained.

This sums up the British. They are a tolerant nation who enjoy their diversity but like to stick to the rules. In the last few weeks, as the threat of bombs has escalated, this has become more apparent.

They have made it clear that they appreciate their multi-layered culture but are horrified that children born in Britain could violate their own country.

There is a rising sense that if you live in Britain, there are certain values by which you should abide. Where once patriotism was seen as more embarrassing than pornography, the British are now beginning to feel that the only way to hold this country together is to give everyone a motive to want to belong, and a reason to be proud of owning a British passport.

Continues here.... http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...ml&sSheet=/portal/2005/07/27/ixportaltop.html

© Copyright of Telegraph Group Limited 2005
Edited to highlight the bit I liked best. :D

Edited by PTP because we do not hold a re-publishing agreement with the Telegraph.
 
#3
It was on the local BBC radio this morning and I was mightily pleased to hear that "freedom to say what we think" was on the top of the list. :)
 
#4
Fantastic article.

This is why i subscribe to their website.

Inciteful, measured and thought provoking!

I especially liked the following...

Andrew Roberts, author of a biography of Lord Salisbury, says that Britishness is easy to define. "We have a profoundly different history to the rest of the world - partly because of our geographical insularity, partly because we are the most constitutionally mature. We were the first to have an industrial revolution and we don't lose wars. We once covered one quarter of the world. Of course, we are unique - we shouldn't be ashamed about our past."
 
#6
Camp Freddie said:
More please, much more.
Great stuff.
Okay..... :D

From the same site.

What is Britishness and what are fundamental British values? A YouGov survey for the Telegraph has found that Britons' sense of national identity depends far more on shared values and institutions than on nostalgia for warm beer and village cricket.
Kelly Holmes
Kelly Holmes, Britain's double gold medal winner at the Athens Olympic Games, polled 51% of the vote

YouGov asked respondents which of a wide variety of words and phrases were important to them in defining Britain and what it means to be British. The percentages saying each was "very important" are set out in the chart.

As the figures show, values such as people's right to say what they think, fairness and fair play, politeness and tolerance of other people and their ideas stand out, with political institutions alongside.

The nation's history is also a central theme. People attach special importance to Britain's defiance of Nazi Germany in 1940, with the emphasis almost certainly as much on "Nazi" as on "Germany". The Royal Navy ranks high as a national symbol, higher even than the monarchy. People also know how much they owe to the fact that Britain has not been invaded since 1066.

Ye Olde Britain, foreign tourists' Britain, clearly matters far less to the natives. Not only warm beer and cricket but also red telephone boxes and double-deck buses scarcely figure in Britons' sense of what their country means. Pubs and Shakespeare matter more.

YouGov poll graphic
Click to enlarge

Individual men and women can also embody a nation's values and character. YouGov asked respondents which of a number of well-known contemporary Britons they take pride in. The responses reflect this year's Britain rather than yesteryear's.

Immigrants from the Caribbean once complained that "there ain't no black in the Union Jack". YouGov says that there is now. Kelly Holmes, the Olympic double gold medallist, is in a virtual dead heat with the Queen. Sir Trevor McDonald comes joint third with Lord Coe. The boxer Amir Khan outranks Tim Henman as an object of pride.

Partly because it is rooted so deeply in the present as well as the past, Britons' sense of national identity seems secure. People never ask themselves the question, "What does it mean to be British?", they just go about the business of being British.

As the figures in the chart show, nearly 90 per cent of YouGov's respondents are not shy about saying that they are proud to be British and almost as many reckon that, taking everything into account, this country has been "a force for good in the world". The British like to moan, but they can afford to moan because they have got so little to moan about.

YouGov poll graphic
Click to enlarge

Since the London bombings, some commentators maintain that Britain and the British way of life are under threat, the implication being that the threat is so serious that it may ultimately destroy the nation and its values. Most Britons are unimpressed, says YouGov.

Well over 80 per cent are either willing to accept that such a threat exists but maintain that extremists have "no realistic chance" of destroying the nation's way of life or else go further and deny that a threat exists at all. Only one individual in eight assents to the proposition that "extremists are threatening the British way of life and British values and may succeed in destroying both".

Perhaps because a large proportion of non-Muslim Britons have peaceful Muslim friends and neighbours, a majority also rejects the idea that this country is in the front line of a "clash of civilisations".

As the figures show, more than half of those questioned insist that "there is no fundamental contradiction between the beliefs of western liberal democracy and the beliefs of Islam, only between liberal democracy and the beliefs of a minority of Islamic extremists and fanatics".

That said, roughly a quarter of people believe that the values of liberal democracy and those of Islam are indeed "fundamentally contradictory" and another quarter remain agnostic on the point.

Just as YouGov's recent survey of British Muslims revealed the existence of a minority of Muslims alienated from mainstream Britain, so this new survey suggests that large numbers of Britons are now suspicious of Islamic ideas, more suspicious than they are of Muslims themselves.

YouGov elicited the opinions of 3,505 adults across Britain online between July 20 and 22. The data have been weighted to conform to the demographic profile of British adults.
# Anthony King is professor of government at Essex University.
 
#7
Ow Joy awol. I can feel a visit to the Bowling club comming on. Full of like minded tw@t's like me.

'Damn this bitter, cigar old chap...'
 
#8
I can never understand people talking about the British drinking 'warm' beer - we just drink it at a cool temperature (kept in cool cellar) rather than chilled until you taste no flavour. For septic beer chilling is important as it conceals the fact that beer has no flavour and little alcohol.
 
#10
But this is Fungus the Bogeyman's new heirarchy of rights:

'Just let us put in place our hierarchy of rights. The right to live. The right to go to work on the underground. The right to have an ID card. The right not to have data abused.'

- Charles Clarke to MEPs before the second bombing, talking up data retention.
WTF?
 
#11
I'll always fly the flag for britain, from my retirement home in New Zealand that is. Good old Blighty. Nice to visit, wouldn't want to live there though.
 
#12
stoatman said:
But this is Fungus the Bogeyman's new heirarchy of rights:

'Just let us put in place our hierarchy of rights. The right to live. The right to go to work on the underground. The right to have an ID card. The right not to have data abused.'

- Charles Clarke to MEPs before the second bombing, talking up data retention.
WTF?
The right to have an ID card? S'cuse me, but isn't that rather a duty? Is that politicians wrapping bitter pills in cotton candy? Naught against ID cards, have had a piccie one all my life, but DNA, iris scan, fingerprints and other Orwellian "Big Brother" shite that leaves the possibility of governmental abuse wide open? Uhm... can't see that as a right. Weird.

However, being proud of one's country & origins is a good thing.
 
#13
Fraulein said:
The right to have an ID card? S'cuse me, but isn't that rather a duty? .
In my book it isn't a duty either - it's an unnecessary, ineffective and intrusive obligation being foisted upon us by a power mad govt which was voted in by a minority of the electorate. :evil:
 
#14
Anyway, back to patriotism. Does the front page of today's Daily Express (27th July 2005) reflect the new patriotic feeling sweeping through the nation? I won't repeat it here, but check it out - and if this doesn't smack of stirring up anti-Muslim intolerance and hatred, then I'm a Dutchman.

I suppose when you're the owner of a patriotic newspaper like this and you 'earned' £1 million a week last year, you feel above considerations such as 'will publishing this shite cause murderous lunatics to set fire to mosques?'
 
#15
frenchperson said:
Anyway, back to patriotism. Does the front page of today's Daily Express (27th July 2005) reflect the new patriotic feeling sweeping through the nation? I won't repeat it here, but check it out - and if this doesn't smack of stirring up anti-Muslim intolerance and hatred, then I'm a Dutchman.

I suppose when you're the owner of a patriotic newspaper like this and you 'earned' £1 million a week last year, you feel above considerations such as 'will publishing this shite cause murderous lunatics to set fire to mosques?'
Tw@t.
 
#16
frenchperson said:
Anyway, back to patriotism. Does the front page of today's Daily Express (27th July 2005) reflect the new patriotic feeling sweeping through the nation? I won't repeat it here, but check it out - and if this doesn't smack of stirring up anti-Muslim intolerance and hatred, then I'm a Dutchman.

I suppose when you're the owner of a patriotic newspaper like this and you 'earned' £1 million a week last year, you feel above considerations such as 'will publishing this shite cause murderous lunatics to set fire to mosques?'
Still France at least is the only nation to have successfully managed to ban a piece of clothing in their exhaustive 'WoT'! Hurrah!

Legionniares getting a bit thin on the ground?
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top