Patrick O’Brian - Aubrey/Maturin

Mr_Relaxed

War Hero
Waterstone’s had Master and Commander on a table so I bought just before Christmas. Finally started reading it and now find myself on book 11!

But that’s not my question. O’Brian seems to be using a lot of sources and Aubrey’s based on a composite of naval officers of the period. This has got me curious and considering some wider reading of officers of the time and ARRSE being what it is, I figured I’d get a better recommendation than what is being offered up by Amazon.

Any suggestions?
 

Mr_Relaxed

War Hero
And this is why I both love and hate ARRSE :) 60 minutes from flash to bang and Amazon are about to make yet more money from me and the wife is about to roll her eyes at another stack of ARRSE inspired books.
 
And this is why I both love and hate ARRSE :) 60 minutes from flash to bang and Amazon are about to make yet more money from me and the wife is about to roll her eyes at another stack of ARRSE inspired books.
Cochrane.
It all you really need.
While Amazon defeats the bookshop appeal its does allow small companies to offload older books in various states of sale
 
Waterstone’s had Master and Commander on a table so I bought just before Christmas. Finally started reading it and now find myself on book 11!
I would suggest that you read the series, or as many of the novels as you like before reading "The Sea Wolf: The Life of Admiral Cochrane". That is because the best of O'Brian's ideas for stories are lifted quite shamelessly from events in Cochrane's naval career.

 

endure

GCM
And when you've had your fill of Jack Aubrey you can move on to the novels of Richard Woodman which are about Nathaniel Drinkwater, another Napoleonic era Royal Navy officer.

Captain Richard Woodman LVO spent 37 years at sea, most of them with Trinity House and, apart from the Drinkwater novels, has written a considerable number of both fictional and historical books about the sea.

My personal opinion is that the Drinkwater novels are a match for O'Brian's and well worth reading.

 
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I have just started re-reading the Aubrey / Maturin books, 25 years after first having read Master & Commander. First time around it was usually only during holiday so I read, probably, 3 a year. This time I am now on HMS Surprise (3rd of the series) without any gaps between books and thoroughly enjoying them again.

As mentioned above, any books on Cochrane will give you an excellent idea as to where POB's inspiration must have come from. I have a couple at home I think and will try and dig them out later and post the titles.
 

Mr_Relaxed

War Hero
I would suggest that you read the series, or as many of the novels as you like before reading "The Sea Wolf: The Life of Admiral Cochrane". That is because the best of O'Brian's ideas for stories are lifted quite shamelessly from events in Cochrane's naval career.

That's the plan, because at the rate of knots I'm getting through the series, I'll be looking for a refill and a biography or two of some of the chaps that Aubrey is modelled on seemed like a good idea.

And I can always rely upon this forum to help me spend money on books. :)
 

ches

LE
Def recommend the Cochrane book after the JA/SM series is done. Sort of ties everything together nicely in a way. They were so well written it piqued my interest in the era to a point i also bought Empire of the Deep to increase my knowledge of the origins of the Navy through to its hey day in the Napoleonic wars.

I first read the series prob 25 years ago & not afraid to say I shed a tear reading the final unfinished novel. Those two characters & their various co-stars, Bonden, Killick, Padeen, Pullings, Diana, Sophie et al were superbly created by O'Brian & I've always got a soft spot for the books. I'm not a fan the novel par se, but this series is one that would never be out of my own library.
 
Over and above Nelson the RN produced any number of outstanding admirals and captains, and the odd rogue.

Collingwood has been mentioned but also consider: Cornwallis (aka billy Blue), Saumarez, Duncan, Hoste, Cochrane (hero and villain), Pellew and so on. And Piggot to show how not to do it. For seamanship, Bligh.
 

endure

GCM
For those familiar with the Z Woodman is to be found there...
 
Sorry for the delayed reply. This is one of the books that I had in mind (there is another, fiction that I am still trying to dig out), very definitely worth reading.

Amazon product
 
And when you've had your fill of Jack Aubrey you can move on to the novels of Richard Woodman which are about Nathaniel Drinkwater, another Napoleonic era Royal Navy officer.

Captain Richard Woodman LVO spent 37 years at sea, most of them with Trinity House and, apart from the Drinkwater novels, has written a considerable number of both fictional and historical books about the sea.

My personal opinion is that the Drinkwater novels are a match for O'Brian's and well worth reading.

Thanks for that I am now on book 4 “The Bomb Vessel” in the series, my only complaint is that some of the more technical terms are completely baffling too me, a minor problem
 
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