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Partners to get say in licences?

#1
BBC News - UK firearms: Licence applicants may need partners' approval

I presume this is response to the couple firearms that have been used in domestic violence recently.

It's seems like a bit of a slegehammer to crack a nut. I would suggest that if the perpetrators didn't have access to firearms, they would have used something else to do the job.

I'm not saying for one moment, that we shouldn't care, but I would certainly suggest that anyone with a record of any form of domestic violence should be out of the loop for a ticket anyway.
 
#4
If the applicant is violent and the partner hasn't left them, what chances are there that the partner will sign out of fear or 'because he loves me really' or 'he only does it when he's had a drink/I upset him'?
 
#6
Why put the onus on the wives/girlfriends/boyfriends/exes. Surely it would be simpler for the Plebs to check to see if someone has any allegations of any sort made against them, and refuse a permit (subject to appeal) if there are.
 
#7
Granting and renewal time.
Here they can come and check when they want, with they initially asked for photographic and receipt evidence of the safe, showing its installation, serial number plate, security class and location.

The only people I know have been checked have been wealthy types and known friends, family, customers and associates of a local gun trader, who is now behind "Swedish curtains".
 
#8
I'm of the camp that reckons there's no need for a firearm unless you use it as part of your job, or if it's as a sport that it's kept at a club.
I think there are enough threads going at the moment where you've made that point repeatedly, so perhaps this one could be saved for discussion of the matter at hand?
 
#13
I am sure you can tell the difference between a firearm in the house that someone is not happy with, maybe to do with children being present and a DL or TV Licence.
The only time a spouse will say 'no' is when the relationship has already broken down, and then it would probably make matters worse. However, 'something must be done - this is something so we must do it.'
 
#14
If the partner really didn't want his/her SO to have SC or FAC then they should simply contact the relivant authority and make thier objections known. As PF said above this is a be seen to do something BS.
 
#16
It just appears to make sense to ask a householder if they are happy with firearms or shotguns being kept in their house.
Why does that make sense? If a wife doesn't like her husband's shooting hobby, it's of no concern to the law unless there's evidence that his possessing them constitutes a danger to public safety or the peace. And if there is such evidence, then he ought not to have one anyway.

I don't think 'Ooh, I don't really like guns' is much by way of evidence.
 
#18
I'm of the camp that reckons there's no need for a firearm unless you use it as part of your job, or if it's as a sport that it's kept at a club.
The problem is that people don't just shoot at a single range, as part of a single club. Our club is inside another facility that has restricted opening hours; so (quite apart from the extra 40 minutes each way as part of any journey) if I need to start early to get to a competition / go to a coaching session at another range (or come back late), I'm stuffed.

There are plenty of people who don't have home storage; they're quite happy. But getting the safe installed, and having the Police check it, can make life a lot simpler once you start to competing outside your own club.

A better question would be "how do you ensure that your partner doesn't have access to firearms / ammunition that they are not licensed to hold"? Easy for me, the wife's got a FAC too, but how do would someone else keep the cabinet keys secure? There was the occasional tale of the licensing officer coming round for a visit, asking the partner for access to the firearms, and then being understandably miffed when said partner demonstrated access...

One particularly picky licensing officer*, who was firmly of the opinion that you only ever needed one rifle of a type, actually insisted that two married members of the GB Squad install locks inside their cabinet, so that husband couldn't use wife's rifle and vice versa. Our local force's solution was to put all four of our rifles on both certificates.

* He was very strict in his interpretation of the Home Office guidelines, but then he was Central Region, and had allegedly had to deal with one T. Hamilton...
 
#19
So what you are saying is that a person should have no say about whether firearms are stored in their house if their spouse decides to go ahead anyway?
Like whether or not to have a puppy/plasma TV/new motor car, that is for a discussion between the couple, and not the business of the police unless there is a danger to the public.
 

Travelgall

MIA
Kit Reviewer
#20
Like whether or not to have a puppy/plasma TV/new motor car, that is for a discussion between the couple, and not the business of the police unless there is a danger to the public.
Exactly. The Zero Alpha is hardly going to be chuffed if Hubby in question says "Darling, you'll never guess what I've replaced your collection of shoes with. I'll give you a clue, it's tall, grey and made of Metal". This conversation will have gone on before - except in cases where the spouse in question is the sort that says "Sign this or you'll get a beating" in which case I'm certain they are unsuitable for Gun ownership. More pointless Box Ticking from Nanny.
 

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