Parkour, does it have any relevance to military training?

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by Jorrocks, Feb 13, 2009.

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  1. A fun way to train and relevant to the military

    53.3%
  2. Training ground for chavs running from the law

    46.7%

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  1. Does anyone use parkour as a training model when preparing for basic training? It looks quite fun, but with a few pseudo martial arts overtones. Being and old fart, I would never try it now, but remember doing similar stuff as a kid climbing on our roof at home, sliding down fire escapes etc. Any views?
     
  2. The RM's apprently did some evaluation of Parkour over the last few years to aid with movement in built up areas and various Yank "them" are supposed to be trained in elements of it....
     
  3. Check out the site at Urban Freeflow for some awesome trg tips on injury prevention, fitness & loads of info on the subject.

    Our trg team have certainly looked at aspects of "free running/parkour" & there is a definate crossover with military agility trg especially when trg potential Army commandos.

    I imagine most units do not do regular indoor or combat agility trg & parkour may be the medium to make it popular. Free runners or tracers would breeze an obstacle course.........no challenge, mind we could soon slow them down with 21lbs plus weapon/helmet etc.

    The RM have done some good work on this, not sure if the Army has embraced it yet...........

    Regards,

    "Sore knees!"
     
  4. Parkour certainly seems attractive, however, practitioners will rehearse a course in much the same way a F1 driver will. I am not seeking to denigrate them, merely pointing out that what you see is the qualifying lap, and not the first practice session. The tricks and techniques are useful, but can you do them with a weapon on your chest and a Bergen on your back?
     
  5. I agree that breezing through an urban environment would be a different matter in fighting order. However, on the plus side, and purely as a training tool, it has to be a great confidence builder and is physically challenging. It is possibly more attractive to the "yoof" of today and lacks the formality of the way we used to tackle assault courses.