Parking ticket for dead relative

cam net

Old-Salt
I am after some advice from the wise, my mum in law got a letter through the door for a parking offence.
It is for a van she sold for her husband who died two months ago.
She sold it to some dodgy Eastern European types but she forgot to keep the tear off strip before handing the log book over.
I informed DVLA by letter, e mail and phone and was told not to worry as they now know and it will be sorted out.
The father in laws name must still be on the van, so can these parking people extract money from a dead man who hasnt seen his van for a couple of months?
 

Jammy66

War Hero
Firstly, is it a parking fine (from a local Authority) or a parking charge from one of those private parking enforcement companies?

In any case, to start with I would send a letter with a copy of the letter you sent to the DVLA explaining the van was sold prior to the date of the parking fine, and also that the registered owner is now deceased.

That little slip does state something along the lines of being liable for fines if you fail to inform DVLA of the sale of the vehicle but as the owner is deceased they will need to ascertain who the legal owner is to go after. I would expect some commonsense to prevail, but private enforcement co's are just like loan shark debt collectors and will keep hassling you hoping you'll give in.
 

cam net

Old-Salt
Firstly, is it a parking fine (from a local Authority) or a parking charge from one of those private parking enforcement companies?

In any case, to start with I would send a letter with a copy of the letter you sent to the DVLA explaining the van was sold prior to the date of the parking fine, and also that the registered owner is now deceased.

That little slip does state something along the lines of being liable for fines if you fail to inform DVLA of the sale of the vehicle but as the owner is deceased they will need to ascertain who the legal owner is to go after. I would expect some commonsense to prevail, but private enforcement co's are just like loan shark debt collectors and will keep hassling you hoping you'll give in.
I believe its a local authority fine, i haven't seen the letter yet, just talked to her on the phone. Like i said, it may be a big job for them to extract a fine from a dead man !!!
 
Don't let them try and bully her into paying, what can effectively be considered, his debt.

Theoretically you can just ignore the letter as it was sent to your deceased FiL. However, for every toerag there are many nice people like your mum in law who want to do the right thing. Write a covering letter explaining that the FiL is deceased, make a copy of the death certificate (write COPY on it in big red letters) and also send a letter to DVLA with a copy of the death cert. saying that the van was sold off as part of the estate and the slip went in the post, though your MiL may have forgotten with the stress of losing her husband and the situation at the time.

They ain't monsters, they deal with bereavement situations regularly. DVLA may need a form filled out in lieu of the slip and proof that the executor of your FiL's estate was responsible for the sale.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Is this what people mean by 'Stiff penalty'?
 
Did the offence occur before or after his death?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
The problem is so common that the DVLA have a bereavement section. Usually it is for reregistering a vehicle in the spouse's name. They are helpful.
 

cam net

Old-Salt
Don't let them try and bully her into paying, what can effectively be considered, his debt.

Theoretically you can just ignore the letter as it was sent to your deceased FiL. However, for every toerag there are many nice people like your mum in law who want to do the right thing. Write a covering letter explaining that the FiL is deceased, make a copy of the death certificate (write COPY on it in big red letters) and also send a letter to DVLA with a copy of the death cert. saying that the van was sold off as part of the estate and the slip went in the post, though your MiL may have forgotten with the stress of losing her husband and the situation at the time.

They ain't monsters, they deal with bereavement situations regularly. DVLA may need a form filled out in lieu of the slip and proof that the executor of your FiL's estate was responsible for the sale.
Forgot to mention that, he left no estate as far as i know.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I believe its a local authority fine, i haven't seen the letter yet, just talked to her on the phone. Like i said, it may be a big job for them to extract a fine from a dead man !!!
they can act like the heavy mob, with scary letters with lots of red ink and threats
the trouble is most are private and on commission
I am dealing with one at the moment and they are trying it on

about 16 years ago when my sister was ill she parked in a safeway car park and collapsed, it was some time until she came around and was able to drive home ( chemo)
she got a parking ticket for staying over 2 hours
I rang the manager explained the problem and sent a letter
he said no problem I will sort it out ( she bought all her shopping there for years)
after she died three more letter arrived each one more threatening, I visited the manager of the store and showed him the letters and her funeral arrangements, he was most upset, and rang them from his office
they said that would be the end of it
it wasnt
this time I visited their office first thing on a Monday morning and sat in the reception until some one came and spoke with me, got the usual rubbish about the person involved is not here etc
I was very polite but they could see I was upset, and I said if I have to come back again I will make sure the local paper are here to record it
I stayed until they wrote me a letter of apology and confirming no further action would be taken
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer

Troy

LE
As you have told these money grabbers that your Father in law has died, they can hardly take him to court. But if they want to rack up expensive court costs trying then perhaps you should let them. It might teach them a lesson.
 
The problem is so common that the DVLA have a bereavement section. Usually it is for reregistering a vehicle in the spouse's name. They are helpful.
They were very helpful when my old man 'answered the final reveille' - helped me get rid of his cars and transfer his cherished plate to my vehicle.
 
The problem is so common that the DVLA have a bereavement section. Usually it is for reregistering a vehicle in the spouse's name. They are helpful.
They were a bit shit when a mate of mine was killed by the (now convicted) drink driver Donna Hackett. In the end it was easier for Wayne to sell his van and bikes after he had died, nobody checked his signature at DVLA. (Technically one wasn't his it was mine on long term loan with him as the registered keeper)
 
It happened after he died, what Effendi said seems logical, the mum in law's head could have been away with the fairies.
Nothing they can do. Obviously he didn’t commit the offence and once you die you have no legal identity. There’s no one to take to court.

You’ve got the confirmatory proof from DVLA, I suggest you inform the charging company of the situation, don’t get into an argument. Once you’ve done this, you will have dispensed any reasonable duty you may have.

Any letters you received addressed to him, just mark deceased (with date), return to sender,
 

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