Parents

#1
I'm not sure if this is the right thread, sorry if it's wrong!

So I'm 17, soon to be 18. I'm hoping to get into college and then join the army but I'm going to see a recruiter just in case college doesn't work out.

My mum is taking it really well and thinks it will be good for me but my dad isn't taking it well at all.
I want to join the infantry, but because of this my dad thinks I'm pretty much going to die or something.
I know he's just worried but I was wondering how I can try and re-assure him that this is a good choice.
I also know I'm turning 18 soon and he'll have no say but I don't want to leave on bad terms with him.

Should I take him up to the careers office with me to talk to someone up there?
Or did can anyone else give me some advice from experience?

Thanks!!
 
#2
Just try to keep him on-side as best you can. I suspect for my mum it was the last thing she wanted for me, but eventually she realised it was what I really wanted and learned to live with it.

By the way, my youngest grandchild is older than you, so feel free to either take this post as the ramblings of an old geezer or as someone who has been there and done it - although my recruiter talked me out of infantry based on my test scores.
 
#3
I can't help with the right advice, but I'm curious about one aspect. Does your dad have first hand experience of military service, or knows someone who has?

Just curious about why he has the particular opinion of the Army - I'm not trying to start an argument.
 
#4
See your inbox.
 
#5
If you are that determined to join up, follow it through. your father has your best interests at heart, as does your mother, its a hard thing for parents to admit that their lad is all grown up, and making decisions that were their prerogative. As in all jobs there are dangers, the military has the most, as in that you have more than a fair chance at being shot at, it goes with the job. My generation of soldiers ( Cold War) had Ireland, FI. Belize & West Germany to contend with. Todays soldiers have all the middle east and Afghanistan, a far greater chance of getting hurt. You will not regret being a soldier, you will see and do things that any civvie would envy. go for it.
 
#7
Do what you think is best,listen to your Dad. Ask him why he is against you enlisting,then explain your reason if you do enlist. I cant say of todays recruiters but in my day young lads ( mainly Junior potential Soldiers) had their parent/s at the ACIO with them.
Then like me and plenty of others had no one with them or had anyone who objected to them enlisting because they came from the care system. Your lucky you have a parent/s who are worried,but at the end of the day its your choice and a choice only you make.
My advice for what it is worth..... Do it as it could be the best decision you ever make. If you do enlist remember basic training is exactly that 'Basic Training' what comes after could be again another fantastic experience you will never regret or forget. All I know is that it was for me and even today I am greatful to the British Army and I still meet up with mates from wayback when I was a scared,underweight kid.

Good luck in whatever 'you' decide
 
#8
I can't help with the right advice, but I'm curious about one aspect. Does your dad have first hand experience of military service, or knows someone who has?

Just curious about why he has the particular opinion of the Army - I'm not trying to start an argument.
No, not him or anyone in my family were in the army. Perhaps if he was he'd be more supportive.
I think his opinion if the army comes about from watching documentaries like the two by Chris terrill as well as young soldiers from BBC
 
#9
No, not him or anyone in my family were in the army. Perhaps if he was he'd be more supportive.
I think his opinion if the army comes about from watching documentaries like the two by Chris terrill as well as young soldiers from BBC
That's a fair reply. Thank you.

I think the advice above regarding your Dad attending a recruiting office with you is sound. The recruiters are probably very different to the ones I encountered in the 70's, and may now be better trained and equipped to explain what Army life is like to both yourself and your parents.

Best of luck!
 
#10
I actually prefer it when Teenagers do come in with their parents so we can answer all the awkward questions, having been on both sides as a Recruiter and having a son who served I do know what parents want to ask. I even don't mind if parents or spouses come in with older applicants either...remember you will always be your parents little son/daughter even when your in your fifties...it is a parents RIGHT to want the best and worry about you through your life. Come into the ACC with your parents.
 

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