Paras without planes: RAF running out of Hercules

bigeye said:
Auld-Yin said:
I can see this lasting as long as the word association then :cry:
The weather hasn't helped the situation. I can't remember what the the safety margins are for mil training jumps but for sports jumping and Paragliding it's been pretty dire of late.

A run of clagged skies/rain won't help.
Nor can I, but I do remember that the wind speed max+min are different for different chutes. Basically low wind is good for rounds and some decent wind for squares.
 
10 to 13's for students Day
8 to 10 Night

SLS 18's to 20 day.......I think.

Trained chaps a tad more and even more iat the COs discretion. Just keep feet n knees tight and accept the landing :D
 
StickyEnd said:
bigeye said:
Auld-Yin said:
I can see this lasting as long as the word association then :cry:
The weather hasn't helped the situation. I can't remember what the the safety margins are for mil training jumps but for sports jumping and Paragliding it's been pretty dire of late.

A run of clagged skies/rain won't help.
Nor can I, but I do remember that the wind speed max+min are different for different chutes. Basically low wind is good for rounds and some decent wind for squares.
On the basis that a 'round' simply falls and a RAM penetrates - you could argue that point both ways.

The wind will carry the canopy at the downwind leg at windspeed + airspeed which equals ground speed. Thus 13knts + 10knts equals a bloody downwind sprint on landing or a very twisted up PLF. A ram-air can land into wind (and the greater the aspect:ratio of the canopy the greater the penetration) and therefore the increased flair chucked in by the occupant will negate the descent speed.

However if the windspeed is too great then the thing will not penetrate and will fly backwards resulting in 'spanish landing' (grassy arrse) gracias - oh never mind. Not to mention possible spinal injuries.
 
bigeye said:
StickyEnd said:
bigeye said:
Auld-Yin said:
I can see this lasting as long as the word association then :cry:
The weather hasn't helped the situation. I can't remember what the the safety margins are for mil training jumps but for sports jumping and Paragliding it's been pretty dire of late.

A run of clagged skies/rain won't help.
Nor can I, but I do remember that the wind speed max+min are different for different chutes. Basically low wind is good for rounds and some decent wind for squares.
On the basis that a 'round' simply falls and a RAM penetrates - you could argue that point both ways.

The wind will carry the canopy at the downwind leg at windspeed + airspeed which equals ground speed. Thus 13knts + 10knts equals a bloody downwind sprint on landing or a very twisted up PLF. A ram-air can land into wind (and the greater the aspect:ratio of the canopy the greater the penetration) and therefore the increased flair chucked in by the occupant will negate the descent speed.

However if the windspeed is too great then the thing will not penetrate and will fly backwards resulting in 'spanish landing' (grassy arrse) gracias - oh never mind. Not to mention possible spinal injuries.
Yes. They like a bit of wind for wing parachutes. How much depends on its penetration rate as you say. Enough wind to turn into at the landing for a slow ground speed on impact. Rounds of course are not too good in strong wind as they tend to just get blown about. HAHO jumps are a gamble. They can be in the air long enough for the wind to change between exit and landing.

It is also different between sports/CT jumps and military ones.
 
StickyEnd said:
bigeye said:
StickyEnd said:
bigeye said:
Auld-Yin said:
I can see this lasting as long as the word association then :cry:
The weather hasn't helped the situation. I can't remember what the the safety margins are for mil training jumps but for sports jumping and Paragliding it's been pretty dire of late.

A run of clagged skies/rain won't help.
Nor can I, but I do remember that the wind speed max+min are different for different chutes. Basically low wind is good for rounds and some decent wind for squares.
On the basis that a 'round' simply falls and a RAM penetrates - you could argue that point both ways.

The wind will carry the canopy at the downwind leg at windspeed + airspeed which equals ground speed. Thus 13knts + 10knts equals a bloody downwind sprint on landing or a very twisted up PLF. A ram-air can land into wind (and the greater the aspect:ratio of the canopy the greater the penetration) and therefore the increased flair chucked in by the occupant will negate the descent speed.

However if the windspeed is too great then the thing will not penetrate and will fly backwards resulting in 'spanish landing' (grassy arrse) gracias - oh never mind. Not to mention possible spinal injuries.
Yes. They like a bit of wind for wing parachutes. How much depends on its penetration rate as you say. Enough wind to turn into at the landing for a slow ground speed on impact. Rounds of course are not too good in strong wind as they tend to just get blown about. HAHO jumps are a gamble. They can be in the air long enough for the wind to change between exit and landing.

It is also different between sports/CT jumps and military ones.
I would take issue here. Whilst it's entirely possible for a strong NW (for example) to change to SW it's a fairly significant meteorological event.

If you are talking about veering or backing winds then that's another matter of course. Veering and Backing are changes in wind direction (clock and counterclock respectively) related to cold and warm fronts and changes at height/pressure and er...what not.

An experienced parachutist who has spent time dangling below a canopy will realize from his drift that the wind direction has changed and alter his landing approach accordingly . Furthermore a strong wind will give more obvious indicators - smoke direction, tree bend etc.

Variable winds tend to be lighter and therefore less significant.

In other words, what is happening above is generally what you'll encounter below.

HOWEVER: Jumping into a valley can present some specific dangers. Apart from the fact that there are always hundreds of power lines - the valley wind will inevitably be stronger (faster) than the prevailing winds above the valley floor due to the venturi effect (thumb over hosepipe = faster water flow). Wind flow on the slope itself will also differ: during the day the airflow is generally up the slope in the late afternoon it flows down towars the valley floor.

Off topic, but when I'm grounded I tend to spout (about these type of sports).

Edited for drivelling.
 
bigeye said:
StickyEnd said:
...
HAHO jumps are a gamble. They can be in the air long enough for the wind to change between exit and landing....
I would take issue here. Whilst it's entirely possible for a strong NW (for example) to change to SW it's a fairly significant meteorological event...
I was thinking more of wind speed at ground level rather than a massive change in direction.
 
StickyEnd said:
bigeye said:
StickyEnd said:
...
HAHO jumps are a gamble. They can be in the air long enough for the wind to change between exit and landing....
I would take issue here. Whilst it's entirely possible for a strong NW (for example) to change to SW it's a fairly significant meteorological event...
I was thinking more of wind speed at ground level rather than a massive change in direction.
Fair enough and a good point. Even on light wind days a thermic gust can increase the wind speed to scary levels. If the wind picks up and you are caught downwind on a ram-air then your PLF is replaced by a RLF landing
(Run Like F uck).

Flying though strong thermals can be a 'interesting' : once in Porterville in S.Africa I watched a canopy go up and start soaring.
And as for landing on a dusty....
 
bigeye said:
...
Flying though strong thermal can be a 'interesting' once in Porterville in S.Africa I watched a canopy go up and start soaring.
And as for landing on a dusty....
TBH I wouldn't know. My experience is entirely from the drop zone safety end, not the retarded falling bit.
 
StickyEnd said:
bigeye said:
...
Flying though strong thermal can be a 'interesting' once in Porterville in S.Africa I watched a canopy go up and start soaring.
And as for landing on a dusty....
TBH I wouldn't know. My experience is entirely from the drop zone safety end, not the retarded falling bit.
The meatbomb part is less interesting to me nowadays, than the flying element. It was, however, parachuting that got me hang gliding and then finally a swap to paragliding... a parachute that not only goes up it stays up and can carry you, your lunch and some good music (via small speakers), for many kms! A much more sedate experience.
 
bigeye said:
StickyEnd said:
bigeye said:
...
Flying though strong thermal can be a 'interesting' once in Porterville in S.Africa I watched a canopy go up and start soaring.
And as for landing on a dusty....
TBH I wouldn't know. My experience is entirely from the drop zone safety end, not the retarded falling bit.
The meatbomb part is less interesting to me nowadays, than the flying element. It was, however, parachuting that got me hang gliding and then finally a swap to paragliding... a parachute that not only goes up it stays up and can carry you, your lunch and some good music (via small speakers), for many kms! A much more sedate experience.
It sounds like fun I must admit. It looked like it too. I just could not afford it when I got interested.
 

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